CollectionsFlare Gun
IN THE NEWS

Flare Gun

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Florida businessman convicted of taking a gym bag containing a loaded flare gun, marine flares and an eight-inch knife aboard a jet at Philadelphia International Airport was sentenced yesterday to eight months in prison and fined $10,000. John "Jack" Kieser reacted glumly to the sentence from U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. Kieser's head sank and his face froze into a deep frown. It was a sharp contrast to his almost jovial attitude at trial in January, when he showed the jury a home video in which he shot himself repeatedly with a flare gun to prove it was harmless.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John "Jack" Kieser, the Florida businessman who parlayed his arrest for taking a loaded flare gun on a U.S. Airways jet into more than 15 minutes of fame that included a TV appearance in which he shot himself with a flare gun, was convicted yesterday by a federal jury. The U.S. District Court jury deliberated just 25 minutes before finding Kieser, 45, of Jacksonville Beach, guilty of possession of concealed dangerous weapons on an aircraft - a loaded flare gun, seven 12-gauge signal flares, and an eight-inch fishing knife - in an Aug. 11 incident at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
November 22, 1997 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday declared a mistrial after the jury said it was deadlocked in the case of the Florida businessman charged with taking a concealed knife and a loaded flare gun onto a passenger airplane. The hung jury in the trial of John "Jack" Kieser came after about 12 hours of deliberations since Wednesday. Jurors interviewed as they left the courthouse said the panel was stalemated by a single juror who wanted to acquit. "He was coming from outer space," said juror Stanley Lelinski, a 69-year-old retiree from Bristol, Bucks County, of the unnamed holdout.
NEWS
August 13, 1997 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A Florida man somehow got through security at Philadelphia International Airport and onto a US Airways jet Monday night with a flare gun, 21 signal flares and an eight-inch knife packed in a duffel bag, federal officials said yesterday. A Philadelphia police bomb squad officer who examined the items told FBI agents that the flares, if fired while the plane was in flight, could have killed someone or caused a crash, according to an FBI affidavit. John Thomas Kieser, 45, described by authorities as a real estate broker and investor from Jacksonville Beach, Fla., was removed from the plane before takeoff, arrested and charged with possession of concealed dangerous weapons on an aircraft.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two days after a security lapse that allowed a man to board a US Airways jet carrying a knife, flares and a flare gun, the head of Philadelphia International Airport yesterday called on federal aviation authorities to let airports, rather than airlines, take charge of security screening. "I'm in the minority on that . . . but my feeling is, let's take it on," said Dennis P. Bouey, the city's aviation director since Jan. 1. "I think we can do a better job. " In the 1970s, the Federal Aviation Administration gave airlines responsibility for security arrangements in airport terminals.
NEWS
November 18, 1997 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a story that strikes a chord with anyone who has ever worried about airline security or fumed at being delayed by an airport security check. It's the story of John "Jack" Kieser, 45, a wealthy Florida businessman who on Aug. 11, despairing of ever getting through a long baggage check-in line at Philadelphia International Airport before his flight to Orlando left the gate, decided to take his Jacksonville Jaguars gym bag on the plane with him. Though the bag went through the metal detector at Gate C-29 without a hitch, Kieser's casual conversation with a woman caught the ear of a wary flight attendant.
NEWS
November 22, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Holding a flare gun at arms' length, Jack Kieser shot himself in the chest three times to prove his contention that a 12-gauge flare launcher isn't a "dangerous weapon. " A nephew videotaped Kieser's bizarre gunplay outside a Chester County barn, and the next day a jury in a federal courtroom in Philadelphia viewed the outcome - three flares bounced off Kieser's leather jacket without harming the wealthy landlord or burning down the barn. Much to Kieser's distress, 11 of 12 jurors who saw the tape wanted to convict him of a federal felony, "carrying dangerous weapons" - a loaded flare gun and 21 signal flares - aboard an aircraft, last August, at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Defendants on trial have been known to do desperate things. Some, against their lawyers' advice, take the witness stand and testify in their own defense. Some panic and flee. But rarely if ever has a man done what Jack Kieser did: He fired a marine flare gun into his chest three times and videotaped the act. His aim was to show that the gun was not a dangerous weapon and that he should not have been arrested for taking it aboard a commercial airliner in Philadelphia three months ago. "I had to prove my point, that this was not a dangerous weapon," Kieser, 45, said yesterday as he left the U.S. Courthouse in Center City, after an hour of testifying in his trial on a charge of carrying dangerous weapons aboard an airliner.
NEWS
August 13, 1997 | by Julie Knipe Brown and Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writer James Thomas contributed to this report
It wasn't the eight-inch knife, or the flares, or the electronic device with dangling wires, or even the flare gun that looked like a 12-gauge shotgun, that got Jack Kieser into trouble at Philadelphia International Airport. After all, he managed to sail right through US Airways security Monday night with the weapons stuffed into his carry-on duffle bag. What did get him into hot water, authorities said yesterday, was using the word "hijack" while chatting with a woman just before boarding an Orlando-bound plane about 7 p.m. Airport officials blamed human error for the mistake that allowed Kieser to smuggle the items onto the aircraft with 139 passengers on board.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert M. Perry tried to be a hero when robbers entered the bar where he was drinking, the prosecutor said. It cost him his life. The 67-year-old patron of the 447 Lounge on Allegheny Avenue was shot and killed when he reached for a flare gun as two robbers entered the place on Feb. 22, 1994. "What are you going to do, old man?" one of the robbers shouted at Perry before shooting him. "Come on, old man. " Yesterday, Ruben Vargas Pinto, 20, of Somerset Street near Rosehill, identified as the gunman, was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison by Common Pleas Judge Jane Cutler Greenspan.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Airline passengers are not getting smarter. This week's attempts by two men to board airplanes at Philadelphia International Airport with fireworks and firearms were not unusual events. In fact, they're getting more common all the time. Last year 1,310 guns - about 3.5 a day - were seized by airport screeners across the nation. That's up from 1,123 in 2010 and 851 in 2005. "Despite our best efforts, the numbers are going up every year," said Ann Davis, a Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
SPORTS
December 16, 2010
THEY GATHERED at Citizens Bank Park for the final time in 2010 - club executives, rows of media, Cliff Lee and his family. The ostensible purpose was the announcement of Lee's return to the Phillies and the assembly of the greatest pitching rotation in the history of the franchise, and one of the greatest in the recent history of the game. It was an organizational celebration, their pride and their anticipation simulcast on all manner of television and Internet outlets. But it was more than that, for anyone who has lived here for any period of time.
NEWS
November 9, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A brief inquiry by investigators in the Washington-area sniper case may have helped Cumberland County authorities apprehend a long-sought murder suspect. William C. Severs Jr., 40, was arraigned in Bridgeton yesterday after being taken into custody early Monday in Ocean City, Md. He is accused of shooting and killing his ex-girlfriend, Tina Labriola, 35, in January with a high-powered rifle as she was leaving a friend's house in Vineland. Severs was featured on the television show America's Most Wanted three times, most recently on Oct. 17. That was shortly after police had turned over information on Severs - who earlier had been traced to the Washington area - to the sniper task force in Maryland.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It looks as if "Flare Man" won't be doing any mischief for about eight months. Jack Kieser, 45, a wealthy Jacksonville Beach, Fla., landlord with a history of erratic behavior, also must pay a $10,000 fine and cannot possess even a flare gun or any other dangerous weapons after his release from prison. This was the punishment imposed yesterday by U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr., who scolded Kieser for trying to board a Florida-bound jet in Philadelphia last summer with a bag full of signal flares, a loaded flare gun and a sheathed fishing knife.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Florida businessman convicted of taking a gym bag containing a loaded flare gun, marine flares and an eight-inch knife aboard a jet at Philadelphia International Airport was sentenced yesterday to eight months in prison and fined $10,000. John "Jack" Kieser reacted glumly to the sentence from U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. Kieser's head sank and his face froze into a deep frown. It was a sharp contrast to his almost jovial attitude at trial in January, when he showed the jury a home video in which he shot himself repeatedly with a flare gun to prove it was harmless.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John "Jack" Kieser, the Florida businessman who parlayed his arrest for taking a loaded flare gun on a U.S. Airways jet into more than 15 minutes of fame that included a TV appearance in which he shot himself with a flare gun, was convicted yesterday by a federal jury. The U.S. District Court jury deliberated just 25 minutes before finding Kieser, 45, of Jacksonville Beach, guilty of possession of concealed dangerous weapons on an aircraft - a loaded flare gun, seven 12-gauge signal flares, and an eight-inch fishing knife - in an Aug. 11 incident at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
"Flare Man" is now a felon. Jack Kieser, 45, a Jacksonville Beach, Fla., landlord, was arrested last August at Philadelphia International Airport for carrying a bag of signal flares, a loaded flare gun and a sheathed knife aboard a Florida-bound jet at Philadelphia International Airport. No one contended that Kieser, who was born and raised in the Philadelphia area, meant anyone harm, but prosecutors insisted his conduct had been reckless. Kieser testified he'd been visiting in this area and purchased the equipment at a local Wal-Mart for canoeing on the ocean outside his beachfront home.
LIVING
November 26, 1997 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They'll never be mistaken for shrinking violets, those sometimes unruly, outspoken Philadelphia Eagles fans. But lest anyone happens to be wondering what those die-hard fans are thinking, they can check out the message in the big, black lettering on that 32-foot-long sign that hangs from the 300 Level at the Vet during every Eagles home game: BUDDYBALL HAS ARRIVED. Or NORM YOU MAKE ME SICK. Or YOU'RE WORSE THAN KOTITE. Direct. Succinct. Brutally honest, just like the fans.
NEWS
November 22, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Holding a flare gun at arms' length, Jack Kieser shot himself in the chest three times to prove his contention that a 12-gauge flare launcher isn't a "dangerous weapon. " A nephew videotaped Kieser's bizarre gunplay outside a Chester County barn, and the next day a jury in a federal courtroom in Philadelphia viewed the outcome - three flares bounced off Kieser's leather jacket without harming the wealthy landlord or burning down the barn. Much to Kieser's distress, 11 of 12 jurors who saw the tape wanted to convict him of a federal felony, "carrying dangerous weapons" - a loaded flare gun and 21 signal flares - aboard an aircraft, last August, at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
November 22, 1997 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge yesterday declared a mistrial after the jury said it was deadlocked in the case of the Florida businessman charged with taking a concealed knife and a loaded flare gun onto a passenger airplane. The hung jury in the trial of John "Jack" Kieser came after about 12 hours of deliberations since Wednesday. Jurors interviewed as they left the courthouse said the panel was stalemated by a single juror who wanted to acquit. "He was coming from outer space," said juror Stanley Lelinski, a 69-year-old retiree from Bristol, Bucks County, of the unnamed holdout.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|