CollectionsFlat Fee
IN THE NEWS

Flat Fee

FEATURED ARTICLES
REAL_ESTATE
February 14, 1988 | By Gene Austin, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Real estate agencies that help sell houses for a flat fee instead of a commission are gaining an increasing foothold in the area, and one flat-rate broker attributes the rise to "a definite change in the real estate market. " As houses get more expensive, a 6 percent commission represents a greater sum of money than before. Some sellers are finding that the services provided by conventional real estate agents are not worth that expense. "With the recent rapid appreciation (in price)
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | By Marlene A. Prost, Special to The Inquirer
Last summer, Newtown Township officials adopted an ordinance that required persons seeking residential subdivisions or land development approval to contribute either land or money for the creation of open space. But when the first applicant under the new law, John Stauffer, was ordered in September to pay $3,000 to build two houses, township officials had second thoughts about the fairness of the law. After months of discussion, the Board of Supervisors voted, 4-1, Monday to change the method by which the contribution - known as the "fee-in-lieu" - is calculated to lower the cost for smaller subdivisions.
REAL_ESTATE
March 8, 1987 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, the small brick building with the red-and-white Help-U-Sell sign on the Ellisburg Circle in Cherry Hill has been somewhat of an outpost on the South Jersey real estate frontier. Inside, its owners, Dale and Arlene Strack, offer homeowners the option of selling their houses for a flat fee, instead of the usually more expensive 6 percent or 7 percent sales commissions charged by most real estate agents. Although the idea is not new, it remains on the periphery of the industry.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1994 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Four years ago, officials in Kansas City, Mo., began charging a flat maximum fare for taxicabs driving into downtown from Kansas City International Airport. It's not working. "In our operation, it has not been successful," Joe Heidi, Kansas City's administrator of commercial vehicles, said yesterday. Cabdrivers found other ways to cheat customers, he said. They sometimes charged customers $2 per piece of luggage or a $5 airport fee. The maximum fare to the downtown "zone" is $40. Passengers can opt to pay what's on the meter, if it's lower.
NEWS
June 28, 1995 | By Rachel E. Stassen-Berger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If the Borough Council accepts the advice of the Utilities, Health and Sanitation Committee, Phoenixville would keep collecting a flat fee for trash pickup. The committee had discussed giving households a per-bag trash fee option but voted Monday to recommend that the full council not include that option in the next sanitation contract. Although it is unpopular, the current trash collection system, in which each household pays a yearly fee of $94, is one of the few working options for Phoenixville's municipal garbage collection.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A successful campaign to lower operating costs has enabled the Bucks County Water and Sewer Authority to announce a proposed decrease in its 1996 rates. The flat fee for quarterly sewer services in the communities served by the authority will drop from $115 to $110, a 4.3 percent decrease, said authority executive director Benjamin W. Jones. The authority provides sewer service to 12,000 households in New Hope, New Britain Township, Doylestown Township, Plumstead, Richland and portions of Buckingham and Solebury.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Shaun Stanert, Special to The Inquirer
Susan Decker, the newly elected tax collector in Morrisville, told the Borough Council on Tuesday that she would do "90 percent" of her work at home, using the telephone and a computer. Decker, 30, a homemaker with a computer-business background, was asked by the board to outline her planned hours of operation and methods of collection. She will succeed John C. Whalen next month. She said she hoped to receive most of the payments for borough, county and school taxes through the mail.
REAL_ESTATE
April 2, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Billy Clouser decided to sell his home in Langhorne last May, he first listed it with a full-service brokerage. But 10 months and three agencies later, he still had no sale. Clouser, a retired carpenter, said he thinks the house was overpriced. But each agent he hired convinced him that the three-bedroom, one-bath rancher should sell for about $145,000, maybe even more. Finally, with the help of a flat-fee broker, Clouser cut his own deal: He slashed the asking price by $20,000 but recouped part of the loss by paying a smaller sales commission.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is the billable hour, long a staple of the legal industry, going the way of the passenger pigeon, the woolly mammoth and the Pyrenean ibex, extinct species all? Under intense client pressure to justify charges following the stock market crash of 2008, law firms took the first steps during the recession toward moving away from hourly charges by offering clients flat fees or by billing based on case outcomes. Now, the flat-fee movement is gaining momentum, with many big firms employing staffs of MBAs, actuaries and other finance experts to price legal engagements and then to make sure lawyers assigned to these matters stay on budget.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2012
4-week bills , Dec. 26; 3-month and 6-month bills , Dec. 24; 1-year bills , Jan. 8; 2-year notes , Jan. 28; 3-year notes , Jan. 8; 5-year notes , Dec. 29; 7-year notes , Dec. 19; 10-year notes , Jan. 9; 30-year notes , Jan. 10; 5-year TIPS , Dec. 20; 10-year TIPS, Jan. 24 ; 30-year TIPS , Feb. 21. Business Referral Luncheon , presented by BNI, King of Prussia chapter. Peppers Italian Restaurant, 236 Town Center Rd., King of Prussia;610-792-2105. Reservations required. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. recurring Networking Meeting , presented by BNI, Fort Washington chapter.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 8, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
We naturally assume that our money managers, our financial advisers, our brokers have our best interests at heart, what's known as a "fiduciary" duty. If not ours, whose best interests are they representing? Well, by law, many of them weren't required to give our interests top priority - until now. The U.S. Department of Labor issued final rules Wednesday that hold financial advisers to a fiduciary standard if they work with retirement savings. That means they must work on their clients' behalf and generally avoid conflicts of interest.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is the billable hour, long a staple of the legal industry, going the way of the passenger pigeon, the woolly mammoth and the Pyrenean ibex, extinct species all? Under intense client pressure to justify charges following the stock market crash of 2008, law firms took the first steps during the recession toward moving away from hourly charges by offering clients flat fees or by billing based on case outcomes. Now, the flat-fee movement is gaining momentum, with many big firms employing staffs of MBAs, actuaries and other finance experts to price legal engagements and then to make sure lawyers assigned to these matters stay on budget.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992 "N
NIGHTCRAWLER" is a horror movie for anyone who's survived layoffs and pay cuts and been told to "work smarter. " Which at this point in America includes just about everybody. The movie's title character is a goblin of management-trainee gobbledygook named Lou Bloom (gaunt Jake Gyllenhaal), a sociopath who at the movie's outset is roaming the midnight byways of Los Angeles looking for what he will later term a "skill" that will put him "on a track toward growth. " He finds it: Bloom stumbles upon a car accident, watches EMTs arrive to help victims, then sees freelance photographers show up to film the carnage.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
DEAR HARRY: I'm in a bind. I prepared my 1040 early, as I usually do to get a refund sooner, but found that I owe Uncle [Sam] a little more than $12,000. I don't have the money, and I want to hold the return until the last minute. The extra tax resulted from a rollover of a regular IRA to a Roth IRA. Today, a friend told me that there was some way I could get the IRS to let me pay in installments. Is this so? How do I go about it? WHAT HARRY SAYS: The IRS recently eased up on the requirements.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2013
4-week bills , Jan. 8; 3-month and 6-month bills , Jan. 7; 1-year bills , Jan. 8; 2-year notes , Jan. 28; 3-year notes , Jan. 8; 5-year notes , Jan. 29; 7-year notes , Jan. 30; 10-year notes , Jan. 9; 30-year notes , Jan. 10; 5-year TIPS , Apr. 18; 10-year TIPS, Jan. 24 ; 30-year TIPS , Feb. 21. Business Referral Luncheon , presented by BNI, King of Prussia chapter. Peppers Italian Restaurant, 236 Town Center Rd., King of Prussia; 610-792-2105. Reservations required. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Networking Meeting , presented by BNI, Fort Washington chapter.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
briThere's no shortage of people who want to manage your money, so how do you check them out? Guard against becoming the victim of the next Bernard Madoff with the help of these sites. BrightScope.com , which describes its mission as being an independent service to "increase the retirement security of America's workforce by bringing transparency and efficiency to the 401(k) plan market," provides a search page for finding a financial planner or firm. You may search by location, specialty, compensation arrangements, total assets under management and other criteria.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Citing the "serious nature of his conduct," a Philadelphia judge denied a request Monday by lawyers for Msgr. William J. Lynn to free the 61-year-old former archdiocesan official on bail while he appeals his child-endangerment conviction. Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina rejected the motion by defense lawyers Jeffrey M. Lindy and Alan J. Tauber after an often-acrimonious 15-minute hearing. On July 24, Sarmina sentenced Lynn to three to six years in prison after a jury found him guilty of child endangerment in the landmark Catholic clergy sex-abuse trial.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|