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Flat Rate

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NEWS
February 9, 1988 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County residents will continue to pay a flat rate for sewer service, although officials of the county sewerage authority conceded last night that the method is flawed and that some smaller customers pay significantly higher bills than heavy users. Despite inequities in charges, the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority is unlikely to revise its method of calculating bills because the system was imposed as part of a court settlement last year, CCMUA attorney Thomas S. Higgins told a group of angry business owners and county residents last night.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
The Valley Forge Sewer Authority, already enmeshed in battles to control odors and win local approval of a planned $2.5 million upgrading, now must defend itself in federal court. Olan B. Lowrey, a Temple University law school professor and the owner of an East Pikeland apartment building, filed suit Monday against the authority, claiming that its flat rate of $280 per unit for residential customers is unreasonable. He is joined in the suit by James Steil, a tenant in the five-unit apartment building.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
The Winslow Township Committee, facing a projected shortfall, last week approved a 43 percent increase in the local water bill, the first increase since 1979. The increase in the 15,000-gallon flat rate, from $26.37 to $37.60 per quarter, is to make up for an anticipated deficit of $399,610 the township would have incurred over the next year. The committee also increased, from $1.21 to $1.85, the rate for each 1,000 gallons used over the 15,000-gallon limit. The new rate will be included in local water and sewer bills beginning Oct. 1. Auditor Rob Scharle said the township had been able to put off a rate increase for 11 years by appropriating money from capital investments.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1997 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
America Online, putting the best face possible on its troubles, last week announced "additional measures" it was taking to satisfy its 8 million subscribers "during this period of unprecedented demand for its network. " It was no secret, however, that those measures, including cash refunds and a moratorium on aggressive marketing of the computer online service, followed threats of legal action by dozens of states whose residents were complaining of constant busy signals instead of AOL's promised "unlimited" access to e-mail, chat rooms and the World Wide Web. And at week's end, AOL's closest competitor, 5-million-member CompuServe, was reporting a four-to-five-fold increase in orders for its software.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Eddystone Borough Council has overturned its October decision to switch its sewer billing next year from a flat rate per household to a rate based on water use. At its meeting Monday, the council voted, 3-2 with two abstentions, to keep the annual sewer fee at $125 per housing unit. The October decision to change to a per-gallon fee based on water use, with billing to be done by DELCORA, was reversed after Councilman Paul Sides 3d noted that some residents' sewer bills would increase dramatically as a result.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
More than 25 Tredyffrin residents attended the board of supervisors meeting Monday night to discuss the sewer rental rates. The supervisors are considering a rate based on water consumption. Township residents currently pay a flat rate of $250 annually. Most municipalities in Montgomery and Delaware Counties bill a flat rate. Last year the supervisors approved a 66 percent increase for sewer rates. A protest over the increase was led by residents in Chesterbrook, a community of townhouses and condominiums, who felt the rate was inequitable.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | by Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer
"It's a dry cleaner's dream come true," says fashion-industry analyst Alan Millstein. "They've been praying for this. " He's talking about beige, the easiest to soil color since white. If you've invested in a fashionable beige linen wardrobe and don't want to go broke keeping it clean, consider using an economy dry-cleaning service that charges by the pound. The establishments listed below will clean your fine unwashables for about a third of the usual price. The catch is, they won't press them.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | By Mary K. Schottmiller, Special to The Inquirer
Tredyffrin Township residents crowded into Monday's Board of Supervisors meeting to support the Chesterbrook Civic Association's proposal to base sewer bills on water consumption instead of a flat rate. The association proposes a rate structure that would charge each household $150 per year for up to 40,000 gallons of water, plus $3.47 per thousand gallons more. The existing flat-rate structure charges each household $250 per year, regardless of water consumption. "Our proposed . . . rate structure is based on the theory that the more a customer uses, the more the customer pays," said Shirley E. Connolly, president of the civic association.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia taxi drivers yesterday put on hold plans for a citywide strike after Mayor Rendell agreed to postpone implementation of a $1.50 fee that cabs would pay each time they left Philadelphia International Airport. City officials said collection of the fee won't start until after the state Public Utility Commission has considered a proposal to let cabs charge a flat rate - probably $17 to $22 - for trips between the airport and Center City. That's about the same fee a passenger pays now to most Center City destinations.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1994 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A passenger hailed a Keystone Cab last week for a routine trip down Market Street, from 18th to Second Street. Before the cab had gone four blocks the meter read $4.20 - and the passenger knew she was being "bopped" by a fast meter. Unfortunately for the cabbie, his customer was Karen Butler, executive director of the Mayor's Action Council for Visitors and a point person the last year in efforts to clean up the taxi business. Butler got the number posted on the side of the cab and blew the whistle.
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NEWS
February 26, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A private university in New Hampshire is offering students a "no-frills" option: more than a 50 percent cut in tuition if they take courses at a satellite campus and forgo many amenities. In New Jersey, Richard Stockton College will allow students to take from 12 to 20 credits for a flat rate. And elsewhere, some colleges are running three-year degree programs, so students can get through school more quickly and save money, using a model common in Europe. The idea of less costly or "no-frills" universities - as proposed by Pennsylvania last month - is under discussion and in some cases is playing out in other communities around the country, as the economy worsens and the price tag for higher education continues to rise.
NEWS
January 16, 2008 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing the increased cost of gasoline, the Philadelphia Parking Authority is proposing raising taxicab fares from $2.10 to $2.30 per mile. If the Parking Authority's board approves, a typical fare will rise from $9.15 to $9.87, officials said. The initial, "flag drop" charge would remain $2.70, but the waiting time would jump from $20 per hour to $22, and the flat rate between Center City and Philadelphia International Airport would go from $25 plus a $1.25 fuel surcharge to $28.50 and no surcharge, the authority said.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2005 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The chairmen of President Bush's special tax-advisory panel outlined a controversial plan yesterday to overhaul the nation's tax code by cutting popular tax breaks. The committee would reduce mortgage-interest deductions, treat some health-care benefits as taxable income, and eliminate the federal deduction of state and local taxes from taxable income. However, with Bush's poll numbers plunging, some GOP congressional leaders indicted or under investigation, and midterm congressional elections next year, it is unclear whether lawmakers will want to risk a public backlash by trimming popular tax breaks.
NEWS
December 2, 2004 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Unionized toll-takers on the Pennsylvania Turnpike returned to their booths yesterday after a weeklong strike that was settled late Tuesday with a tentative three-year contract. "It's fantastic" to be back to work, toll collector John Myers at the Lansdale exit on the turnpike's Northeast Extension said. Myers and other union members said they were waiting for stewards to fill them in on terms of the proposed contract, which were not made public. For thousands of drivers, the end of the strike means the end of flat-rate tolls on the 531-mile highway system.
NEWS
November 27, 2004 | By Jere Downs INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Black Friday shoppers crammed into the King of Prussia mall, a pro-union Santa stood vigil with striking Pennsylvania Turnpike toll collectors nearby on day three of their first-ever strike. At 380 pounds, the bearded, 60-year-old retiree and friend of striking workers was the picture of Santa, albeit with a Teamsters shirt beneath his red coat and a picket sign shoved under his wide black belt. "My deer will not cross a picket line," Drexel Hill resident Tom Anthony warned as he waved to motorists at the Valley Forge interchange.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | By Aileen Soper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the first tremors of a building boom were felt here in the mid-1980s, developers wanted some insurance that future homeowners would be able flush their toilets and drain the dirty dishwater. The builders paid up - $42 a quarter for each home they planned to construct - to reserve space at the local sewer plant, run by the Limerick Township Municipal Authority. Customers who actually used the system paid more: a flat rate of $87.50 a quarter for each EDU, or equivalent dwelling unit, a measure of about 250 gallons per day. Last year, the municipal authority phased out the five-year "dry" rental contracts with the developers, losing $60,000, or 17 percent, of the $350,000 in revenue it took in every three months, said Barbara Frankel, executive director.
NEWS
November 8, 1998 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A trivia question for those on the road or in the woods: Are you more likely to fatally hit a deer or contract Lyme disease from a deer tick? If you live in Montgomery County, take the deer. In Delaware County, guess Lyme disease. Should you try out this one in a bar bet, best to bring along the Delaware County TODAY/Almanac for verification. It's all there, year after year, on pages 61 and 67. Such data have made the almanac an informational reservoir for 74 years in Delaware County, where the annual listings offer a cradle-to-grave treasure trove, from births to marriages to deaths, along with every locally elected official, town, school, election result and retirement community.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1997 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
America Online, putting the best face possible on its troubles, last week announced "additional measures" it was taking to satisfy its 8 million subscribers "during this period of unprecedented demand for its network. " It was no secret, however, that those measures, including cash refunds and a moratorium on aggressive marketing of the computer online service, followed threats of legal action by dozens of states whose residents were complaining of constant busy signals instead of AOL's promised "unlimited" access to e-mail, chat rooms and the World Wide Web. And at week's end, AOL's closest competitor, 5-million-member CompuServe, was reporting a four-to-five-fold increase in orders for its software.
NEWS
February 11, 1996
Steve Forbes is getting hit left and right over his flat tax. Rival candidates say it would raise taxes on the middle class and bloat the deficit. On Thursday, Newt Gingrich called some of its features "nonsense. " But Mr. Forbes still has lots of fans in his corner, including some who have done their own math that shows them coming out ahead. If the flat tax would put money in their pockets and simplify the paperwork, why should they worry that it would save the rich a lot more?
NEWS
February 11, 1996 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The United States slipped from second to third place in number of international tourist arrivals in 1995, while Spain moved into second place and France retained its usual ranking as No. 1, according to the World Tourism Organization's annual tally. Spain's improvement was attributed to its parlaying exposure from the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona into tourism appeal. U.S. tourism officials noted that the United States has a similar opportunity with the Atlanta Olympics coming up in July.
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