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Flat Tax

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NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Steven Thomma, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The Republican Party is catching flat-tax fever, setting up an election-year fight with Democrats over whether wealthier Americans should pay more taxes or get tax cuts. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney became the latest to punch the tax button Wednesday, telling a Virginia audience that he will soon update his economic proposal to spell out how to flatten the tax code. A day earlier, rival Rick Perry proposed an optional flat 20 percent tax on income.
NEWS
September 26, 2010 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Before Patrick Toomey made a second run for the U.S. Senate, the Pennsylvania Republican published The Road to Prosperity: How to Grow Our Economy and Revive the American Dream . I'm all for prosperity, despite exhibiting little talent for amassing wealth. (Chapter One: Avoid Journalism.) So, if there's a direct thoroughfare, lead the way. I went online to buy his book, which had an original list price of $22.95 when it was published last summer. There, I found The Road to Prosperity selling for $1.52.
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Jack Kemp wants to level the playing field for America's taxpayers. Kemp, the former congressman and potential Republican presidential candidate, will appear in a political ad prior to tonight's State of the Union address to push for a flat, single-rate income tax. In the 60-second spot, which will air nationally on the Cable News Network, Kemp appears with former Secretary of Education and drug czar William J. Bennett. The pair are co-directors of Empower America, a conservative political organization.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
House Majority Leader Dick Armey's flat tax was formally introduced into the House and Senate yesterday with a twist: Once the bill is enacted, any major changes would require a three-fifths majority vote of Congress. The bill, introduced by Armey (R., Texas) and Sens. Richard C. Shelby (R., Ala.) and Larry E. Craig (R., Idaho), would end deductions and credits and would impose a single 17 percent rate on earned income. For individuals, taxes on unearned income such as interest, dividends and capital gains would be eliminated.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | BY DAVID A. GRIMES
Reading W. Russell G. Byers' article on the flat tax proposal, I get this feeling of deja vu. I know what it is! I have heard all this before, in 1992, from a presidential candidate, Edmond G. "Jerry" Brown - a postcard to file your tax returns, a law that "no member of Congress shall receive assistance in preparing their tax returns. " Brown said our tax laws are insane. We must give consideration to a bill that would stabilize our income tax laws in the sense of a five-year plan.
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | By Deroy Murdock
"The toughest challenge Steve Forbes ever had to face was when he was a sperm swimming upstream to the egg. " Who said this? A tax-and-spend Democrat? No. The author of these ugly words was none other than Jim Courtovich, New Hampshire campaign manager for Phil Gramm. Courtovich's obnoxious snipe is emblematic of an unusual development on the campaign trail now that Forbes has vaulted into first place in some polls for the bellwether Feb. 20 New Hampshire primary: His rival GOP presidential candidates have sunk to left-wing, class-war rhetoric to derail him and his proposal for a deduction-free 17 percent flat tax. Mercedes owner Pat Buchanan complained that Forbes' flat tax "was worked up by the boys at the yacht basin.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
In a compromise necessary to save West Chester from serious financial problems, a judge tomorrow will direct that up to $150 each in a flat tax be collected from merchants and professionals while the contested business- privilege tax is on appeal in Commonwealth Court. At an executive session last week, West Chester Borough Council authorized its solicitor, Stephen P. McGuire, to work on an agreement stipulating that the interim tax be collected. Attorneys for the 29 merchants who sued the borough over the tax are working on a similar agreement.
REAL_ESTATE
March 3, 1996 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
It's called a "flat" tax because the income of all businesses or individuals would be taxed at a single rate, no matter the amount. It's been proposed as a way to reform the federal income tax, and, under most proposals, it would avoid double taxation that now occurs for corporate earnings. The tax base for businesses would be gross sales minus wages and purchases from other businesses. Interest payments would not be deductible. For individuals, the tax base would be wages and pensions, minus standard personal deductions.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Republican congressional candidate Jonathan H. Newman called a news conference yesterday to say he wanted to get rid of all 3,500 pages of the tax code. But he didn't say what should replace them. He did promise definitive numbers "sometime" before the May primary, in which he faces incumbent U.S. Rep. Jon Fox (R., Pa.). Preliminarily, Newman said, he would favor instituting a flat income tax between 17 and 22 percent and preserving deductions for charitable giving and home-mortgage interest.
NEWS
January 19, 1996
The flat tax is a bad idea. The idea can look attractive because one of its premises is something taxpayers know by instinct or experience: The tax system is too darned complicated. It's a wonder there isn't a word that means fear of April 15. In reality, filing ye old tax return isn't that hard for most Americans, 70 percent of whom use the short form. You do have to wonder how many do that only because it's easier. But easy, schmeasy, proponents can't make a flat tax fair.
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NEWS
October 11, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In the last debate of the gubernatorial campaign Wednesday and a meeting with the Inquirer Editorial Board Thursday, Democratic nominee Tom Wolf reiterated his refusal to detail his plans for the state income tax. Indeed, Wolf's studied vagueness on the subject has become familiar enough to be routine. But that shouldn't make it any less troubling. The York County businessman has proposed making the state's constitutionally mandated flat tax progressive by exempting an unspecified amount of income and raising the rate.
NEWS
October 9, 2014
HOW ABOUT some tax talk? Wait, wait, don't leave. This is important, or could be. It's a big part of the governor's race and likely to be a focus of the final debate in Pittsburgh tonight. Republican Gov. Corbett says he should be re-elected for keeping taxes low and because Democrat Tom Wolf will raise taxes - without saying how much. Wolf argues Corbett's management and tax policy hurt education, job creation and state fiscal ratings. Wolf says he just wants to make taxes fairer.
SPORTS
December 2, 2013 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
NASHVILLE IS a hidden gem among stops on the NHL tour, with inviting country-music sounds and neon-soaked spirits spilling out of the honky-tonks on Lower Broadway next to Bridgestone Arena. Inside, the Predators skate in front of one of the most unusual - and passionate - fan bases in hockey, which the Flyers will get a taste of tonight in their third trip to the Music City since 2005. For three seasons after July 1, 2009, though, Nashville became the city NHL players loathed to visit.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
By Alan Gottlieb When the British newspaper the Telegraph asked readers which of six suggested measures they would like to see introduced in the House of Commons, the response was surprisingly tilted toward one significant proposal. Of the six suggestions, which included setting a flat tax and placing a term limit on the office of prime minister, what drew more than 86 percent of reader support was a proposal to repeal the handgun ban of 1997. This is an unscientific poll, but the results should signal to U.S. gun prohibitionists that their habitual use of the United Kingdom as an example of domestic tranquility where guns are concerned just took a direct hit in the credibility department.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
D EAR HARRY: It seems that every day I get an email or brochure that advocates a flat income tax. I know that it means a single rate for everyone, but is it good or bad for T.C. Mits (The Common Man/woman in the Street)? Could you give me some of the pros and cons? WHAT HARRY SAYS: Most ofcoursely. Incidentally, I like T.C. Mits. Remember that a pro for some will be a con for others. Here we go: It is simpler to calculate. This argument is not really important, because the bracket system requires only one extra step: adding the top tax figure for the next lower bracket to the one multiplication you'd have to make anyway.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Smith, the Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate from Pennsylvania, released his economic-policy plan Wednesday, calling for a "flat tax" on all earners. Smith, in a news conference at a City Avenue hotel, declined to specify what percentage of income he thought Americans should pay. But he said a flat tax would be an improvement on the current tax code, which he described as full of "gimmicks" and "loopholes" and "10 times the length of the Bible without any of the good news.
NEWS
August 17, 2012
Not everyone is pitching in Adam Benforado defends the taxation of the $25,000 awarded to the Olympic gold medalists, as well as taxing the wealthy commensurate with the money they make, even when some would suggest that to do so is unfair ("Why we tax success," Tuesday). Not necessarily. If the Olympic athletes earn that money by what they do, then it should be taxed just like any other income. In that respect, I agree with Benforado. However, he justifies the tax by analogizing the tax system with a team: Since we are all part of "team America," as he phrases it, we should all "pitch in. " Unfortunately, that's not the way it works, which is exactly what's wrong with our convoluted, grossly unfair tax code.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Kasie Hunt, Associated Press
FLORENCE, S.C. - His wealth and taxes suddenly a campaign focus, Mitt Romney said Tuesday that he pays an effective federal tax rate of about 15 percent. That's far less than if his earnings were wages rather than gains from investments and dividends, and the disclosure under pressure triggered a sharp response from the Democratic White House as well as one of his GOP presidential rivals. Romney said he also received money from speechmaking - "but not very much" - before he announced his presidential candidacy early last year.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
FLORENCE, S.C. - His wealth and taxes suddenly a campaign focus, Mitt Romney said yesterday that he pays an effective federal tax rate of about 15 percent. That's far less than if his earnings were wages rather than gains from investments and dividends, and the disclosure under pressure triggered a sharp response from the Democratic White House, as well as from one of his GOP presidential rivals. Romney also told reporters that he received money from speechmaking before he announced his presidential candidacy early last year "but not very much.
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