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FOOD
September 20, 2012
Mustard comes in many varieties and flavors, and there can be, as a recent blind tasting proved, an equally wide range of tastes and colors even within a specific type of mustard. Ditto for the wording on the labels, which can read "Düsseldorf," "Düsseldorf style," or say nothing at all, even when the mustard is made in Düsseldorf. You may need to linger in the condiments aisle and read labels to get some idea of what you're buying. Tasters sampled a variety of mustards in the Düsseldorf style.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
At its simplest, wine-making is just the business of crushing grapes and letting the yeast from the grape skin ferment the juice. Fermentation turns the sugar in the grape into alcohol and produces a bunch of other flavors at the same time. Sometimes the wine tastes just like the kind of grape juice it was made from. Sometimes it tastes more complicated - other flavors are induced when the newly created alcohol comes into contact with the grape's natural flavors. But where do the flavors of the grape come from?
FOOD
May 12, 1991 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The statue of an Egyptian goddess greets customers in the dusty doorway. She is one of a roomful of antiques at Liberties, a restaurant and bar that duplicates one of this historic (Northern Liberties) neighborhood's early taverns. Liberties' ceiling is copper and tin. The floor is mostly mosaic tile, the sort you still find in the bathrooms of unrestored Victorian rowhouses. The mirror behind the long, curving wooden bar is clouded and, hence, kind to the reflections of aging customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
No matter what your music flavor, Philly has it. In Old City tonight, the sound is Latin, with Jay Rockwell at Brasil's; it's Caribbean in West Philly, with Rookie, Roger Culture and Ross at Pegasus. Manayunk has hip-hop for you Saturday, when Sat-One gets on the turntables at Grape Street Pub, and then again Sunday, at Chemistry with Doc B. Along the waterfront Sunday, the house beats are spun by Richie Rich and John Gill at Chrome. And Wednesday, be sure to get to South Fourth Street for "Tigerhook Session IV" at Fluid.
FOOD
August 17, 1994 | by Jim Tarantino, Special to the Daily News
Every year, right around the time the flies come out, hard-core serial grillers are relentlessly grilling or smoking just about anything they can get their hands on. While we often associate grilled foods with the tastes of the marinades, rubs or salsas that accompany them, the ingredient that's in almost anything cooked outdoors is the flavor of smoke. When we grill with coals, hardwoods or smoking chips, we add smoke to the recipe. Grilling over coals or wood is one of the few cooking processes that leave a specific flavor postmark and tell you exactly how it was sent.
FOOD
November 12, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Serving a meal with a south-of-the-border accent captures a sense of celebration - sensual, colorful and bursting with flavor. The richness of Mexican cuisine has developed over centuries. It is a dramatic blend of the original Indian fare and the strong influences of the Spanish. The preeminent agricultural contribution that the early natives called maize, and we know as corn, still plays a significant role. Grains, as well as legumes, are staples, with meat used sparingly.
FOOD
November 1, 1989 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Whether sweet, hard or packing an inebriating wallop, apple cider is the potion to down by the dram when foliage flares to ocher and red. It is the lacquer that paints a plain roast chicken with a glaze of just-fallen fruit. And it's the jug on the pantry shelf that calls us to luxuriate in another harvest before winter settles in. Cider is made by crushing apples into a pulp, then pressing the pulp to extract its juice. After that, the juice can be bottled and sold immediately as sweet cider.
FOOD
September 22, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Get more for less. If you're a bargain-hunter, calorically speaking, you want more flavor for fewer calories. Here are some ideas: GET A LEMON. IF your diet vetoes sweet or salty, think tart and tangy. Use lots of lemon and lime, not only on seafood but with poultry and meat as well. (Italians like their steak squirted with lemon - it's terrific.) TRY TEA. Become a connoisseur of the calorie-free. Expand your expertise on different kinds of coffees and teas. EXTRACTING MORE FUN. Experiment with pure flavors and extracts, not just vanilla.
FOOD
August 13, 1995 | By Steven Petusevsky, FOR THE INQUIRER
Greens are user-friendly vegetables because they cook quickly and are extremely nutritious. Numerous varieties - both common and exotic - are available in the market these days, and other new ones are appearing all the time. Greens not only taste good, but some are considered "wellness foods. " These are foods that belong to a family of vegetables called crucifers - specifically kale, mustard greens and collards. (Other vegetables such as broccoli and Brussels sprouts are also good sources.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 17, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Inside the sweltering heat of a greenhouse near the Jersey Shore, where the afternoon summer temperatures can hit 160 degrees, a bit of the Atlantic Ocean is rapidly transforming before our eyes into one of civilization's oldest treasures. "I'm literally swimming in salt," says Derrek Thomas, 43, leading us between the 2,000-gallon retention pools that line the new salt house he and his partner, chef Lucas Manteca, 38, built on Thomas' Windy Acres farm in Ocean View. "I can't get water fast enough.
TRAVEL
May 25, 2015 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
Tiki's Restaurant on Waikiki Beach provides all that a visitor to Honolulu expects: a superb view of the setting sun melting into the Pacific, flaming tiki torches casting dancing shadows, fruity drinks served in coconuts. But a few delights are unexpected, such as entrées featuring locally sourced Kahuku corn and arugula, with organic herbs from the base of the nearby Ko'olau Mountains. Farm-to-table offerings in a tropical paradise? Agriculture and tourism have long been two of Hawaii's main industries, so it makes sense that "agritourism," which exposes visitors to the state's unique food culture, would follow.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been 21 years since North Carolina won its last NCAA men's lacrosse title. And if that is to change this spring, some local players will have to play a big part. The Tar Heels are seeded third overall. And when they begin pursuit of the national championship with a first-round game with Patriot Conference winner Cornell on Sunday, All-ACC selections Joey Sankey (Penn Charter) and Ryan Kilpatrick (Salesianum, Del.) will be key. The Tar Heels (12-3) are riding a two-game losing streak after winning 12 of their first 13 games.
FOOD
April 3, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
On Easter Sunday, after the sugar crash from too much candy, dinner traditionally revolves around a big, glossy ham. It may look picture-perfect as a holiday centerpiece, but if that ham came from the supermarket, its origin story is probably not so pretty. Luckily, there are options in locally produced hams with backstories you can feel good about. Ember Crivellaro, who runs Country Time Farm in Berks County with her husband, Paul, wants those who buy her hams to know what kind of life the pigs had. Because pictures speak louder than words, she carries a small collection of photographs in her wallet.
FOOD
April 3, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Marc Vetri, chef owner of Vetri, Osteria, Amis, Alla Spina, Pizzeria Vetri, and Lo Spiedo, recently was nominated for a James Beard award for best chef in the country. He recently discussed his new book Mastering Pasta (Ten Speed Press) at the Free Library of Philadelphia. Below is a condensed version of our conversation. When was the first time you made pasta? When did you know this is what you wanted to do? Wow. I don't even really remember. My father's family, they're from Italy.
SPORTS
February 18, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Twice this season, Penn State point guard Shep Garner, a freshman out of Roman Catholic, has gone viral in the college hoops world - and really neither time it was because of his own actions. Garner was just playing ball. The first time, the Nittany Lions were at home against Virginia Tech in December. "I think there was a timeout before we came out," Garner remembers. "I think everyone lost focus. " He meant everyone but him. The video is the kind you end up watching over and over.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
PHILADELPHIA real-estate developer Shawn Bullard is the first black man to court love on television whose name is not Flavor Flav . Bullard is the focus of "Match Made in Heaven," WeTV's foray into the reality love game, premiering Wednesday at 8 p.m. The twist is that he'll get romantic input from Indianapolis Colts spiritual adviser Pastor Ken Johnson and his mother, Maggie Bullard . Bullard's small place in television history...
FOOD
January 30, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Years before anyone cared about kale and way before Brussels sprouts went viral, Tozer Seeds, the largest family-owned vegetable-breeding company in England, started playing around with the idea of producing a hybrid combination of the two. Called Flower Sprouts, they debuted in 2010 at a single department store, Marks & Spencer in London. By late 2014, the market had spread elsewhere in the U.K., Scandinavia and Europe, where sprouts' popularity dwarfs kale's. Now the American version from Tozer - under the brand name Kalettes, to cash in on our continuing obsession with all things kale - is available at Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, and other select supermarkets.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
  For some time now, the Chrysler 300 has had trouble deciding whether it wants to be a popularly priced large sedan or a luxury car. But those days are over, according to Al Gardner, the Chrysler brand's high priest. The reworked 2015 Chrysler 300 will be "decidedly mainstream," Gardner declared at a recent regional press introduction for the new 300. And as such, it will do battle with the likes of the Chevy Impala and Toyota Avalon. Actually, you could argue that it is still walking in both camps.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2014
NARROWING the field to just one Beer of the Year is a daunting task. Here are my other favorite new beers of 2014. Anderson Valley Blood Orange Gose (Boonville, Calif.). Don't ask me how Gose, a heretofore obscure tart German wheat beer made with salt, coriander seeds and lactic bacteria, became the trendiest new style of 2014. Tasting like a cross between a mimosa and a margarita, this one comes in cans. I'm looking forward to revisiting it down the Shore this summer. Ballantine India Pale Ale (Los Angeles)
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