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FOOD
September 20, 2012
Mustard comes in many varieties and flavors, and there can be, as a recent blind tasting proved, an equally wide range of tastes and colors even within a specific type of mustard. Ditto for the wording on the labels, which can read "Düsseldorf," "Düsseldorf style," or say nothing at all, even when the mustard is made in Düsseldorf. You may need to linger in the condiments aisle and read labels to get some idea of what you're buying. Tasters sampled a variety of mustards in the Düsseldorf style.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
At its simplest, wine-making is just the business of crushing grapes and letting the yeast from the grape skin ferment the juice. Fermentation turns the sugar in the grape into alcohol and produces a bunch of other flavors at the same time. Sometimes the wine tastes just like the kind of grape juice it was made from. Sometimes it tastes more complicated - other flavors are induced when the newly created alcohol comes into contact with the grape's natural flavors. But where do the flavors of the grape come from?
FOOD
May 12, 1991 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The statue of an Egyptian goddess greets customers in the dusty doorway. She is one of a roomful of antiques at Liberties, a restaurant and bar that duplicates one of this historic (Northern Liberties) neighborhood's early taverns. Liberties' ceiling is copper and tin. The floor is mostly mosaic tile, the sort you still find in the bathrooms of unrestored Victorian rowhouses. The mirror behind the long, curving wooden bar is clouded and, hence, kind to the reflections of aging customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
No matter what your music flavor, Philly has it. In Old City tonight, the sound is Latin, with Jay Rockwell at Brasil's; it's Caribbean in West Philly, with Rookie, Roger Culture and Ross at Pegasus. Manayunk has hip-hop for you Saturday, when Sat-One gets on the turntables at Grape Street Pub, and then again Sunday, at Chemistry with Doc B. Along the waterfront Sunday, the house beats are spun by Richie Rich and John Gill at Chrome. And Wednesday, be sure to get to South Fourth Street for "Tigerhook Session IV" at Fluid.
FOOD
August 17, 1994 | by Jim Tarantino, Special to the Daily News
Every year, right around the time the flies come out, hard-core serial grillers are relentlessly grilling or smoking just about anything they can get their hands on. While we often associate grilled foods with the tastes of the marinades, rubs or salsas that accompany them, the ingredient that's in almost anything cooked outdoors is the flavor of smoke. When we grill with coals, hardwoods or smoking chips, we add smoke to the recipe. Grilling over coals or wood is one of the few cooking processes that leave a specific flavor postmark and tell you exactly how it was sent.
FOOD
April 26, 2007
The idea isn't revolutionary: The Vietnamese have long grilled food on sugar cane. But Seasoned Skewers take the game to another level. We had great success grilling cubes of pork, apples and onions on the honey-bourbon-flavored sticks. (Also in garlic-herb, citrus-rosemary, and Thai coconut-lime.) Tender times three Calphalon, whose pots we love, is launching a line of gadgets: peelers, can openers, graters, seed removers, zesters, and this nifty three-way tenderizer. It has three separate surface textures, for pounding cutlets, steaks or tough cuts you'll stew or braise - and a soft-touch handle to ward off blisters.
FOOD
November 12, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Serving a meal with a south-of-the-border accent captures a sense of celebration - sensual, colorful and bursting with flavor. The richness of Mexican cuisine has developed over centuries. It is a dramatic blend of the original Indian fare and the strong influences of the Spanish. The preeminent agricultural contribution that the early natives called maize, and we know as corn, still plays a significant role. Grains, as well as legumes, are staples, with meat used sparingly.
FOOD
November 1, 1989 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Whether sweet, hard or packing an inebriating wallop, apple cider is the potion to down by the dram when foliage flares to ocher and red. It is the lacquer that paints a plain roast chicken with a glaze of just-fallen fruit. And it's the jug on the pantry shelf that calls us to luxuriate in another harvest before winter settles in. Cider is made by crushing apples into a pulp, then pressing the pulp to extract its juice. After that, the juice can be bottled and sold immediately as sweet cider.
FOOD
September 22, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Get more for less. If you're a bargain-hunter, calorically speaking, you want more flavor for fewer calories. Here are some ideas: GET A LEMON. IF your diet vetoes sweet or salty, think tart and tangy. Use lots of lemon and lime, not only on seafood but with poultry and meat as well. (Italians like their steak squirted with lemon - it's terrific.) TRY TEA. Become a connoisseur of the calorie-free. Expand your expertise on different kinds of coffees and teas. EXTRACTING MORE FUN. Experiment with pure flavors and extracts, not just vanilla.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 9, 2014
  BUZZ:   Hey, Marnie, can grapes grow indoors? My neighbor does hydroponic tomatoes in his sunroom, so why not wine grapes? Marnie: Grapevines are more like little trees than tomato plants, Buzz. They need to put down deep roots and would require tending for decades. Besides, hydroponic grapes would make for pretty bland wine. Buzz: Why's that? Marnie: Well, hydroponic gardening uses no soil - plant roots are bathed in a nutrient solution instead. This produces decent flavor in herbs and greens, since leaves have a simple flavor structure, but grapes are more multidimensional.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2014
PHILLY is increasingly known as a vegan-forward town, with places in most neighborhoods where you can enjoy an animal-free dinner or lunch. But what about breakfast? Recently, a friend staying in town overnight asked for a good weekday vegan breakfast spot, and I was stumped. Partly that's because I tend to be at my house at breakfast time, and partly it's because breakfast flies under the radar: You don't think about it that much until you really need it. I posed the question on the Web and got some great info from fellow vegans and "vegan-friendlies.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
What? You missed the Cool Alert from Rita's Italian Ice about the newest flavor, Starburst Orange? Anyone with a sense of right, wrong, and sugary frozen treats has downloaded the Rita's app and constantly monitors the device to keep track of news of what flavors are available. Don't you realize that, with Monday's announcement of Rita's third marketing deal with candy-maker Starburst, Starburst Orange ice went on sale April 7, will be available only until April 27, and then will disappear forever?
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Ford is getting a lot of mileage out of its Fiesta. For the last year, the Detroit automaker has been rolling out the 2014 update of its popular subcompact in dribs and drabs: starting with its 38 m.p.g. S last summer, followed by its street-legal rally-crosser - the 35 m.p.g. ST, last fall - and, most recently, a 45 m.p.g. 1-liter SFE that's been on sale since December but was made available to the media only in March. To put the 1-liter in context, it is so compact that a Ford engineer packed the engine block in a carry-on suitcase and took it through TSA security without a hitch.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the mark of a well-run kitchen is consistency, then my mother must be doing something right. Her matzo ball soup, just like her mother's and her grandmother's, has been made the same way for decades: with a poached whole chicken breast, halved carrots, and golden bubbles of chicken fat rising to the surface amid bobbing matzo balls, made with the recipe on the back of the Manischewitz box. "I do almost the same thing every time," she told me....
NEWS
March 7, 2014
What to eat : As far as we can tell, Sweet Box makes some of the best cupcakes in Philly: orange Creamsicle, chocolate peanut butter, thin mint, strawberries and champagne, chocolate Guinness Stout with whiskey filling and Baileys Irish Cream frosting, espresso hazelnut praline, bacon maple, beer infused, cayenne cinnamon. All served up by the lovely - yet extremely hardworking - Gretchen Fantini. If she doesn't make a flavor you like, your taste buds are on the fritz. Trust us. Don't miss: Based on the amount of strawberries Fantini purees, she believes her strawberries-and-champagne cupcakes are a best-seller.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
  B   UZZ: Hey, Marnie, I saw this TV ad with Amber Rose drinking whipped-cream vodka. How do you make vodka out of whipped cream? Marnie: That's easy, Buzz - you don't. What you're thinking of is flavored vodka, where a neutral base spirit gets dolled up with fancy flavors. Advertising can blur the lines of what's an ingredient and what's an added "flavor. " Buzz: And have you seen that "wedding cake" vodka? Is wedding cake even a flavor? Heck, my wedding cake was made out of beef jerky.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | BY MISTER MANN FRISBY, For the Daily News
NEW YORK - It may be back in Manhattan for the first time in 40-some years, but NBC's "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" has more Philly flava than a Butterscotch Krimpet. Wynnefield native and international film star Will Smith did the honors as first guest when Fallon's era of the late-night staple began Monday night. In an early skit called "The Evolution of Hip-Hop Dance," the former Fresh Prince dusted off his old moves with Fallon. The duo pulled off the Cabbage Patch, Running Man, the Wop and the classic Kid 'n' Play kick-step, among other old-school dances.
SPORTS
December 30, 2013 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHOENIX - They are representing Philadelphia in the Southwest. Guard Dionte Christmas and forwards and twins Marcus and Markieff Morris bring a Philadelphia flavor to the Phoenix Suns. "It's amazing," Markieff Morris said of three Philadelphians playing on the same team, before the Suns played the 76ers. "We are just making it happen for the city and doing what we've got to do. " The Morris twins even showed Christmas a little brotherly love after he signed his free-agent contract with the team on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Business as usual more often finds Pandora Young, a deceptively slight woman of 32, lugging heavy root-balls down the path in a wheelbarrow, whacking back unruly shrubs, or battling aggressive weeds. Today's assignment promises much lighter fare for Young, one of eight outdoor gardeners at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square. An inventive forager, she's introducing a visitor to a colorful melange of perennial fruits and vegetables gleaned from the grounds of this abundant DuPont estate.
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