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NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last time Anne Cappelletti handicapped national awards, she was certain her son John wasn't going to win the 1973 Heisman Trophy. "Bill Lyon was at our house the night before," Cappelletti, 86, recalled Friday, referring to the former Inquirer columnist. "I said, 'Bill, what do you think?' He said, 'He doesn't have a chance.' " John Cappelletti, of course, did win the Heisman - "We were shocked," said his mother - and the Penn State back's stirring acceptance speech about a younger brother dying of leukemia resulted in the family's first brush with Hollywood, the 1977 made-for-TV film Something for Joey . Now, 40 years later, Cappelletti is equally pessimistic when asked to rate the Academy Award chances Sunday of best-picture nominee Silver Linings Playbook , parts of which were filmed on her Upper Darby block and in which she, reluctantly, played a small part.
FOOD
February 22, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Stuffed cabbage recipes are the realm of grandmothers and winter. I grew up with a sweet-and-sour beef and rice version simmered in lemony tomato sauce, just like many other Philadelphians of Jewish descent. We called it prakas, a Yiddish name with roots in Eastern Europe. Whatever your background, there are likely cabbage roll recipes in your family ancestry. Poles have golabki, Czechs and Slovaks call it holubky; Turks and Armenians eat dolmas. In Quebec you can ask for cigares au chou.
FOOD
February 21, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Stuffed cabbage recipes are the realm of grandmothers and winter. I grew up with a sweet-and-sour beef and rice version simmered in lemony tomato sauce, just like many other Philadelphians of Jewish descent. We called it prakas, a Yiddish name with roots in Eastern Europe. Whatever your background, there are likely cabbage roll recipes in your family ancestry. Poles have golabki, Czechs and Slovaks call it holubky; Turks and Armenians eat dolmas. In Quebec you can ask for cigares au chou.
FOOD
February 14, 2013 | Craig LaBan
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: Happy Mardi Gras!! I always get that gumbo feeling this time of year. Where do you plan to get into your Mardi Gras mood?   Reader: I vote Khyber Pass all the way! Reader: I was at Khyber last week and they had a Walker's style cochon de lait po' boy on special. It was like being in NOLA from the first bite. Reader: What do YOU recommend? C.L.: Well, I like some of the other contenders pretty much - Rex was a nice surprise for South Street, and Cajun Kate's is such a fun hidden gem to come across in the Booth's Corner Farmer's Market . . . but no one in town right now is nailing the true NOLA flavors quite like Khyber Pass.
FOOD
February 8, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick, Washington Post
A small amount of chorizo provides big flavor. Roasted Pork Tenderloin With Black Bean-Chorizo Ragu Makes 6 to 8 servings Ingredients: 1 3/4 pounds trimmed pork tenderloins (2 pieces) 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon dried oregano Salt and black pepper 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium onion, cut in 1/4-inch dice (1 cup) 1/2 medium red pepper, cut in 1/4-inch dice (1/2 cup) 4 ounces fresh chorizo sausage, casing removed 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 1/2 cups black beans (homemade or 15-ounce can, drained)
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | byline w, o email
STATE STORE PICK OF THE WEEK Cline Viognier North Coast California $11.99 PLCB Item No. 3006 If you like Chardonnay, chances are you'll LOVE viognier. It shares Chardonnay's framing qualities, in that it is usually dry and voluptuously full-bodied, full of juicy fruit flavor and not sharply acidic. Where it differs is in its aromatic profile. Chardonnay is relatively sedate in its buttered popcorn and apple pie flavors; viognier features an exuberant riot of tastes and smells - lychees and peaches, violets and muskmelons.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013
Buzz: It felt like 20 below the other day, and I was in line behind a lady buying white wine. Who'd want to drink cold white wine when it's freezing out? Marnie: You'd be surprised, Buzz. A lot of people simply prefer white wines over reds, and the temperature doesn't have much to do with it. We don't stop drinking juice or soda or milk in the winter, so why not enjoy our chilled wines as well? White wine consistently outsells red in the U.S., and Chardonnay is almost twice as popular as cabernet sauvignon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
FOLLOWING in the creamy tradition of the "SNL" "Schweddy Balls," Stephen Colbert's "AmeriCone Dream" and Jimmy Fallon's "Late Night Snack," Ben & Jerry's will commemorate the end of "30 Rock" with a new ice-cream flavor, rumored to be tied to Tina Fey's character, Liz Lemon. Maybe "Liz Lemon Meringue"? Or might they go in another direction with: "Kenneth's Possum Crunch"? "Tracy Leches"? "Jack and the Vanilla Bean Stalk"? "Chocolate-Peanut Butter Toofer"? The flavor will be in Ben & Jerry's ice-cream shops next month and available in still-16-ounce pints soon thereafter.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Kate Brumback, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Commemorative events for the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. slid seamlessly into celebrations of the swearing-in Monday of the nation's first black president, with many Americans moved by the reminder of how far the country has come since the 1960s. "This is the dream that Dr. King talked about in his speech. We see history in the making," said Joyce Oliver, who observed King Day by visiting the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., built on the site of the old Lorraine Motel, where King was assassinated in 1968.
FOOD
January 17, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Dried beans, the once-humble legumes that have been considered magical since the tale of Jack and the Beanstalk, are rising to superstar status as chefs and home cooks rediscover their value as a cheap, healthy protein, especially as Americans are eating less meat. For health as well as environmental reasons, in a supporting role or in the center of the plate, people are eating more beans, says Linda Smithson, cofounder of FoodWatch. Garbanzo, navy, black, cannellini, no matter the variety, these old reliables all satisfy the growing number of people choosing or requiring a specialized diet: vegan, vegetarian, diabetic, gluten-free, lactose intolerant, or the ever popular flexitarian - choosing to be any of the above when the mood strikes.
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