CollectionsFlight Data Recorder
IN THE NEWS

Flight Data Recorder

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lewis Katz, 72, co-owner of The Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com, died Saturday night in the crash of a private jet at a Massachusetts airfield. All seven people aboard were killed when the Gulfstream IV crashed about 9:40 p.m. as it was departing Hanscom Field in Bedford for Atlantic City International Airport, said a Massachusetts Port Authority spokesman. The jet never became airborne, a National Transportation Safety Board official said Sunday. Instead, it rolled off the runway and onto the grass before striking an antenna and a fence, coming to rest in a gully where it burst into flames, said Luke Schiada, a senior air-safety investigator.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
David Warren, 85, an Australian scientist who invented the "black box" flight data recorder, has died, Australian defense officials said Wednesday. Mr. Warren, who died Monday, came up with the idea for the cockpit voice recorder after investigating the crash of the world's first commercial jet airliner, the Comet, in 1953, the Defense Department said in a statement. He believed it would be helpful for airline accident investigators to have a recording of voices in the cockpit. He designed and constructed a prototype in 1956, but it took years before officials understood just how valuable the device could be and began installing them in commercial airlines worldwide.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | Associated Press
PARIS - Investigators have located and recovered the missing memory unit of the flight data recorder of a 2009 Air France flight, a remarkable deep-sea discovery they hope will explain why the aircraft went down in a remote area of the mid-Atlantic, killing all 228 people on board. France's air accident investigation agency, BEA, said a search by a submarine probing 12,800 feet below the ocean's surface located and recovered the unit Sunday morning. The recorder is now aboard the Ile de Sein, a ship helping to conduct the probe, the statement said.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IT HAS NOW BEEN two weeks since a bizarre, horrific plane crash claimed the lives of philanthropist Lewis Katz, three of his friends and three crew members. Their loved ones remain haunted by a single question: How did this happen? A preliminary report released yesterday by the National Transportation Safety Board suggested that pilot error may have played a role in the crash. According to the report, the flight-data recorder on Katz's Gulfstream IV showed no evidence that the pilots performed a "flight-control check" before attempting to take off from Hanscom Field, in Bedford, Mass., on May 31. The problem: The plane's rear tail flaps, known as "elevators," were in a downward position, which prevented the plane from lifting off. The Gulfstream got up to a top speed of 165 knots as it rumbled down the runway, but the plane could not leave the ground.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The release of the first bits of information from EgyptAir Flight 990's mangled flight data recorder yesterday only deepened the mystery of why the airplane went down in the North Atlantic early Halloween morning. The Cairo-bound Boeing 767 was cruising uneventfully at 33,000 feet when its autopilot suddenly disconnected. Eight seconds later the airplane, filled with 217 people, started "what appears to be a controlled descent" from 33,000 feet to 19,000 feet, National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Jim Hall said.
NEWS
June 1, 2012
Israel gives over extremists' bodies GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - In an effort to renew long-stalled peace talks, Israel on Thursday handed over to the Palestinian government the remains of 91 extremists who had been killed while carrying out suicide bombings and other attacks. The bodies had been buried in coffins in Israel and were dug up for the transfer. Seventy-nine were transported to Ramallah, which is run by the Palestinian Authority, and 12 to the Hamas-run Gaza Strip, which is run by the rival Islamic extremist group Hamas.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Signaling that something criminal may have caused the crash of EgyptAir Flight 990, the National Transportation Safety Board hinted yesterday that it may turn the investigation over to the FBI. The lead accident investigators said that after poring over the cockpit voice tape, they were looking into whether someone else - an unspoken reference to the FBI - should take over the inquiry into the Oct. 31 crash. A federal law enforcement official told the Associated Press that the question of a criminal investigation was raised because "one view is that a crew member is heard on the cockpit tape to say something religious in nature" in Arabic.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN LESS than a minute, seven lives were lost Saturday at a tiny airfield outside Boston. In the moments before that tragedy, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, the pilots at the helm of a jet owned by Daily News co-owner Lewis Katz aborted the takeoff and struggled to bring the aircraft to a halt as it sped down a runway at nearly 200 mph. All seven people on board, including Katz, died when the plane plummeted down...
NEWS
February 4, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Investigators found the second "black box" and pieces of wreckage from Alaska Airlines Flight 261 yesterday, as an analysis of the first "black box" prompted the question of whether the emergency procedures the crew was following triggered the fall that killed 88 people. The first "black box" - the cockpit voice recorder - was recovered Wednesday. The second "black box" - the flight data recorder, pulled from the ocean yesterday - should show the positions of the plane's controls and whether a problem with the horizontal stabilizer was merely a symptom of a larger failure that led to Monday's crash.
NEWS
April 6, 1991 | By Joan Sanchez, Associated Press Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
A commuter plane carring former Sen. John Tower, his daughter and 21 others crashed and burned yesterday, killing all on board, authorities said. A NASA astronaut and the president-elect of a large physicians' group also died in the crash. The twin-engine turboprop plane was en route from Atlanta to Brunswick when it crashed in a wooded area about three miles from the airport where it was to land, said Lee Duncan, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman. The death of Tower, a Texas Republican who served four terms in the Senate, came a day after an air collision over Lower Merion Township killed Sen. John Heinz (R., Pa.)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IT HAS NOW BEEN two weeks since a bizarre, horrific plane crash claimed the lives of philanthropist Lewis Katz, three of his friends and three crew members. Their loved ones remain haunted by a single question: How did this happen? A preliminary report released yesterday by the National Transportation Safety Board suggested that pilot error may have played a role in the crash. According to the report, the flight-data recorder on Katz's Gulfstream IV showed no evidence that the pilots performed a "flight-control check" before attempting to take off from Hanscom Field, in Bedford, Mass., on May 31. The problem: The plane's rear tail flaps, known as "elevators," were in a downward position, which prevented the plane from lifting off. The Gulfstream got up to a top speed of 165 knots as it rumbled down the runway, but the plane could not leave the ground.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN LESS than a minute, seven lives were lost Saturday at a tiny airfield outside Boston. In the moments before that tragedy, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, the pilots at the helm of a jet owned by Daily News co-owner Lewis Katz aborted the takeoff and struggled to bring the aircraft to a halt as it sped down a runway at nearly 200 mph. All seven people on board, including Katz, died when the plane plummeted down...
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lewis Katz, 72, co-owner of The Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com, died Saturday night in the crash of a private jet at a Massachusetts airfield. All seven people aboard were killed when the Gulfstream IV crashed about 9:40 p.m. as it was departing Hanscom Field in Bedford for Atlantic City International Airport, said a Massachusetts Port Authority spokesman. The jet never became airborne, a National Transportation Safety Board official said Sunday. Instead, it rolled off the runway and onto the grass before striking an antenna and a fence, coming to rest in a gully where it burst into flames, said Luke Schiada, a senior air-safety investigator.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
YOU'LL HAVE no trouble spotting the double entendre in "Flight," a stunning drama featuring Denzel Washington as an airplane pilot who's at once a hero and an addict. Washington's "Whip" Whitaker is a pilot who doesn't have to be at 20,000 feet to be high. That's the obvious reference, and it's presented here with subversive nerve: Whip's actually a better pilot than most when he's found the right mixture of alcohol and cocaine. But there's yet a third meaning to the movie's title, and we see it kick in after the bravura crash-landing sequence that director Robert Zemeckis uses to open the movie, wherein the born-to-fly Whitaker makes a series of fantastic and unprecedented maneuvers to save a crippled airliner from nose-diving into the ground.
NEWS
June 1, 2012
Israel gives over extremists' bodies GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - In an effort to renew long-stalled peace talks, Israel on Thursday handed over to the Palestinian government the remains of 91 extremists who had been killed while carrying out suicide bombings and other attacks. The bodies had been buried in coffins in Israel and were dug up for the transfer. Seventy-nine were transported to Ramallah, which is run by the Palestinian Authority, and 12 to the Hamas-run Gaza Strip, which is run by the rival Islamic extremist group Hamas.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | Associated Press
PARIS - Investigators have located and recovered the missing memory unit of the flight data recorder of a 2009 Air France flight, a remarkable deep-sea discovery they hope will explain why the aircraft went down in a remote area of the mid-Atlantic, killing all 228 people on board. France's air accident investigation agency, BEA, said a search by a submarine probing 12,800 feet below the ocean's surface located and recovered the unit Sunday morning. The recorder is now aboard the Ile de Sein, a ship helping to conduct the probe, the statement said.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
David Warren, 85, an Australian scientist who invented the "black box" flight data recorder, has died, Australian defense officials said Wednesday. Mr. Warren, who died Monday, came up with the idea for the cockpit voice recorder after investigating the crash of the world's first commercial jet airliner, the Comet, in 1953, the Defense Department said in a statement. He believed it would be helpful for airline accident investigators to have a recording of voices in the cockpit. He designed and constructed a prototype in 1956, but it took years before officials understood just how valuable the device could be and began installing them in commercial airlines worldwide.
NEWS
November 14, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein, Maureen Fan and Amie Parnes INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seconds before it corkscrewed into a Queens neighborhood, American Airlines Flight 587 twice rattled loudly, and its pilot complained of turbulence from a plane in front of it, a preliminary review of the cockpit voice recorder revealed. Witnesses to Monday's crash saw the Airbus A300 wobble, and they "saw pieces come from it, and then it went into a steep, spiraling dive into the ground," George Black Jr. of the National Transportation Safety Board said last night. While Marion Blakey, NTSB chairwoman, said the investigation was moving quickly, the crash's cause remained unclear.
NEWS
February 4, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Investigators found the second "black box" and pieces of wreckage from Alaska Airlines Flight 261 yesterday, as an analysis of the first "black box" prompted the question of whether the emergency procedures the crew was following triggered the fall that killed 88 people. The first "black box" - the cockpit voice recorder - was recovered Wednesday. The second "black box" - the flight data recorder, pulled from the ocean yesterday - should show the positions of the plane's controls and whether a problem with the horizontal stabilizer was merely a symptom of a larger failure that led to Monday's crash.
LIVING
November 30, 1999 | By John Woestendiek, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 18 days, they waited off the coast of Nantucket - their mission unclear, but their equipment ready - as the Navy salvage ship Grapple floated 270 feet above the wreckage of EgyptAir Flight 990. Below them lay a much-desired black box and the remains of 217 people, and - as was the case with Swissair Flight 111, which crashed off the coast of Nova Scotia in 1998, killing 229; and TWA Flight 100, which crashed off Long Island in 1996, killing...
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|