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Flood Protection

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NEWS
January 17, 2008 | By Maya K. van Rossum
The Delaware River is often recognized as the last major free-flowing river east of the Mississippi. But this does not mean the Delaware is totally unscathed by dams. Three dams that sit on the Delaware's major headwater tributaries allow New York City to draw up to 800 million gallons per day of Delaware River water to support their communities in the Hudson watershed. Flows from the reservoirs also ensure drinking-water supplies for downstream communities, including Philadelphia. The massive size of these obstructions and their storage capacity have a dominating effect on the health and flows of the entire river, affecting all communities in this watershed.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Tuesday it will devote additional oversight to Exelon Generation Co.'s Three Mile Island 1 reactor after finding inadequate flood protection of safety equipment at the Middletown facility.   The NRC said its inspectors last year discovered unprotected electrical conduits through which water could infiltrate the plant's safety equipment in the event of a severe flood. The deficiency was identified during one of the agency's post-Fukushima reviews of U.S. reactors.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The politicians were back in Betty Carr's back yard Tuesday morning. This time, County Commissioner Jon D. Fox and State Rep. Martin Laub (R., Montgomery) brought company: officials from the state Department of Environmental Resources taking another look at Sandy Run Creek, which floods its banks when it rains. Although Monday night's rain caused water to wash only about 50 feet (halfway) across Carr's back yard, when it rains steadily it laps at her back porch. "It's the township's responsibility to come out and do something," Carr said.
NEWS
March 24, 2008 | By Edward G. Rendell
The issue of how to control flooding along the Delaware River is a difficult one made all the more complex because of the potential for unintended consequences. That is why I, along with the other Delaware basin governors, have worked to develop and research measures that balance the need for flood protection against our need for a reliable supply of drinking water. For instance, for the first time in the 75-year history of the basin, operations of the New York City reservoirs today take into account flood mitigation needs.
NEWS
October 30, 2012
By Michael P. Nairn Even as residents of Southwest Philadelphia's flood-prone Eastwick neighborhood face the consequences of another major storm, city officials are considering a zoning change that would lead to the construction of more than 700 apartments there. Bordering Darby Creek and Cobbs Creek, Eastwick is located on a floodplain, an inherently unstable and shifting landscape. Moreover, it's downstream of the Clearview and Folcroft Landfills, which are federally designated Superfund sites.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In a case with wide implications for Shore restoration following Hurricane Sandy, the state Supreme Court heard an appeal Monday of a $375,000 jury award to a Long Beach Island couple who said construction of a barrier dune in 2010 deprived them of their ocean view. The Army Corps of Engineers built a 22-foot-high dune for storm protection in front of Phyllis and Harvey Karan's house after Harvey Cedars condemned a portion of their beach five years ago. A Superior Court jury awarded the couple damages in 2011, finding that the dune construction, while benefiting many of the surrounding homeowners, had substantially diminished the value of the Karans' $1.9 million home.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By David Porter, Associated Press
MOONACHIE, N.J. - Images of New Jersey's devastated shoreline captivated the nation in the days after Sandy. Less noticed was the enormous damage caused inland when a mile-and-a-half-long earthen barrier along and near the Hackensack River was breached, sending a tidal surge washing over parts of several towns, damaging more than 2,000 homes and other buildings. Now attention is turning to what can be done to prevent similar river flooding in future storms, and townspeople and officials don't like what they are hearing because no one seems to own the problem.
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Piper can almost step out of his sunken living room into the placid West Branch beyond his picture window. He and his wife, Beth, have a splendid view of the river as it wends out of the mountains and into Lock Haven, the town that Piper and his family's aircraft company once dominated. In 1972, the West Branch of the Susquehanna River flooded and sent oil drums, logs and railroad ties through this living room. Water came to within three inches of the ceiling. Piper had to be rescued from the roof.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | By Heather Dewar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Floodwaters have barely receded from 24,000 homes destroyed along California's San Joaquin River in January, and the Dakotas' Red River continues to rise, threatening more homes by the day. Yet, new development is planned in the flood plains of both rivers: 58,000 houses along the San Joaquin, and a dam that would increase water flows along the Red River. Local governments are going along. Among the projects already approved: Gold Rush City, a 7,000-home development and theme park complete with African wildlife, on an island in the middle of the San Joaquin.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Harold Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
The battles to prevent construction of the Point Pleasant water diversion system, popularly known as "the pump," may be over, but environmentalists in Central Bucks County are gearing up for another fight that could equal pump confrontations in intensity. The proposed construction of the estimated $8 million Dark Hollow Dam on the Neshaminy Creek was debated Monday at a luncheon meeting of the Bucks County Conservation Alliance. The dam is the last remaining structure to be built under a 1966 flood- control plan for the Neshaminy watershed.
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NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
AVALON, N.J. - Though they are from different countries and represent governments that may be oceans apart on mitigating crises, they found themselves on common ground as they walked along a beach in this Jersey Shore town. And now an ongoing exchange between local officials and government representatives from the Netherlands may create a confluence of ideas about coastal protection that could benefit both regions, Mayor Martin Pagliughi said. "We thought we could learn a thing or two from a country that has been involved in coastal protection for hundreds of years.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In a case with wide implications for Shore restoration following Hurricane Sandy, the state Supreme Court heard an appeal Monday of a $375,000 jury award to a Long Beach Island couple who said construction of a barrier dune in 2010 deprived them of their ocean view. The Army Corps of Engineers built a 22-foot-high dune for storm protection in front of Phyllis and Harvey Karan's house after Harvey Cedars condemned a portion of their beach five years ago. A Superior Court jury awarded the couple damages in 2011, finding that the dune construction, while benefiting many of the surrounding homeowners, had substantially diminished the value of the Karans' $1.9 million home.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Tuesday it will devote additional oversight to Exelon Generation Co.'s Three Mile Island 1 reactor after finding inadequate flood protection of safety equipment at the Middletown facility.   The NRC said its inspectors last year discovered unprotected electrical conduits through which water could infiltrate the plant's safety equipment in the event of a severe flood. The deficiency was identified during one of the agency's post-Fukushima reviews of U.S. reactors.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By David Porter, Associated Press
MOONACHIE, N.J. - Images of New Jersey's devastated shoreline captivated the nation in the days after Sandy. Less noticed was the enormous damage caused inland when a mile-and-a-half-long earthen barrier along and near the Hackensack River was breached, sending a tidal surge washing over parts of several towns, damaging more than 2,000 homes and other buildings. Now attention is turning to what can be done to prevent similar river flooding in future storms, and townspeople and officials don't like what they are hearing because no one seems to own the problem.
NEWS
October 30, 2012
By Michael P. Nairn Even as residents of Southwest Philadelphia's flood-prone Eastwick neighborhood face the consequences of another major storm, city officials are considering a zoning change that would lead to the construction of more than 700 apartments there. Bordering Darby Creek and Cobbs Creek, Eastwick is located on a floodplain, an inherently unstable and shifting landscape. Moreover, it's downstream of the Clearview and Folcroft Landfills, which are federally designated Superfund sites.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | By Vicki Smith and Stacey Plaisance, Associated Press
BELLE CHASE, La. - Floodwaters from Isaac receded, power came on, and businesses opened Friday ahead of the holiday weekend, the beginning of what is certain to be a slow recovery for Louisiana. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney visited flood-ravaged communities, and President Obama said he would arrive Monday, appearances this part of the country is all too familiar with after Katrina and the gulf oil spill. Meanwhile, the leftovers from the storm pushed into the drought-stricken Midwest, knocking out power to thousands of people in Arkansas.
NEWS
April 12, 2008 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A temporary plan to reduce flooding along the Delaware River - a stop-gap measure Gov. Rendell called for earlier this month - is reported likely next week. Whether it will include increasing releases from three New York City-owned reservoirs has not been determined. "We're just asking everyone to be very patient," Neil Weaver, spokesman for Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection, said yesterday. "A result will come . . . within the next week. " His counterpart in New York City, Michael Saucier, would say only: "Discussions are continuing.
NEWS
March 24, 2008 | By Edward G. Rendell
The issue of how to control flooding along the Delaware River is a difficult one made all the more complex because of the potential for unintended consequences. That is why I, along with the other Delaware basin governors, have worked to develop and research measures that balance the need for flood protection against our need for a reliable supply of drinking water. For instance, for the first time in the 75-year history of the basin, operations of the New York City reservoirs today take into account flood mitigation needs.
NEWS
January 17, 2008 | By Maya K. van Rossum
The Delaware River is often recognized as the last major free-flowing river east of the Mississippi. But this does not mean the Delaware is totally unscathed by dams. Three dams that sit on the Delaware's major headwater tributaries allow New York City to draw up to 800 million gallons per day of Delaware River water to support their communities in the Hudson watershed. Flows from the reservoirs also ensure drinking-water supplies for downstream communities, including Philadelphia. The massive size of these obstructions and their storage capacity have a dominating effect on the health and flows of the entire river, affecting all communities in this watershed.
NEWS
August 22, 1999 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Although less than a half-inch of rain fell last month, more than 6,700 Gloucester County residents soon could be bailing water out of their basements. Residents of East Greenwich, Greenwich, Harrison, Logan, Mantua and Woolwich could be inundated with water if the federal government doesn't make repairs to the 80-year-old Repaupo Creek floodgate before it's too late, officials fear. Part of a 4.3-mile levee stretching from Clonmell Creek in Greenwich Township to White's Basin in Logan Township, the floodgate, which prevents the Delaware River from overflowing the creek and flooding its 21-square-mile watershed, is crumbling.
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