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NEWS
March 25, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Garrett Hill florist was congratulated by friends Wednesday night after winning a special exception from the Radnor Township Zoning Hearing Board to relocate his shop. His friends did not want him to move away from the neighborhood. The five-member board unanimously approved the application of William Giangiulio to convert a three-story residential structure into a retail flower shop at 126 Garrett Ave. Giangiulio now operates his florist business at 157 Garrett Ave., at the corner of Conestoga Road, but he told the board that his landlord was doubling his rent and forcing him to move.
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph Cullinan, a florist who was busy nurturing people when he wasn't caring for plants, died Wednesday of complications from several strokes. He was 79 and lived in South Philadelphia. Cullinan had been in business for more than 50 years. He was still working seven days a week in his shop at 21st Street and Passyunk Avenue until about 10 months ago, when he suffered his first stroke. Cullinan grew up in the business. His father, James, had a greenhouse in the Fort Mifflin area.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Little Shop of Horrors, an amiable comedy of terror based on the Off- Broadway musical, originated in the 1960 schlock-movie classic featuring a young Jack Nicholson. Like its previous incarnations, the new film stars a nebbish florist, a blond corsage-maker and a cursing, flowering vine that wants their blood. Altogether, it's powerful propaganda against talking to your house plants. Not to mention a rare specimen of bloom-or-bust moviemaking. Director Frank Oz's upscale version of this downbeat musical doesn't reconcile the built-in schizophrenia of the stage play, which asked to be laughed at and taken seriously.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Guernsey Cow restaurant on Route 30, an Exton landmark for 50 years, has a new life, at least temporarily. Since Thursday, florist Ron Marron has been selling flowers, wreaths and Christmas trees at the site of the restaurant, which closed in January. The tree sales will end in three weeks, but more permanent plans are being considered for the site, according to Romaine Crawford Mulley, general manager of the owner, Exton Square Inc. Exton Square bought the restaurant from Elmer Polite of West Chester two years ago. It opened in the 1930s as the Guernsey Cow Dairy Bar, specializing in ice cream.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel J. Carboni, 89, of Holmesburg, a florist and father of 13, died at home Tuesday, Feb. 28, of heart failure. Mr. Carboni grew up in Holmesburg with five older siblings. After completing eighth grade, he dropped out of school and held a series of jobs, including working on a pig farm and a chicken farm, his daughter Kathleen Heron said. During World War II, he served in the Navy as a signalman aboard the destroyer escort William T. Powell in the North Atlantic. Before shipping overseas, he married Mary Hartwell.
NEWS
February 16, 1995 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Just last month, Lena Matthews Haymon was helping out in the florist shop she had owned for more than 50 years in the Strawberry Mansion section of North Philadelphia. Although she sold the business in December, she was still in and out of the shop on York Street near 27th. She died Friday at the age of 92. "She loved flowers, she loved her work," said her sister, Thelma Marshall. "Otherwise, I don't think she would have stayed in it as long as she did. " Haymon's business savvy, her awards for floral designs and her generosity to schools and neighbors attracted the attention of former Philadelphia schoolteacher and writer Edith Moore Stephens.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1999 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Say it's 2 a.m. tomorrow, and you're just slinking home from a night of poker with the boys. Suddenly it comes to you: It's Valentine's Day. Where you gonna go? If you're Brian Brackeen, you know one reliable answer: Trolley Stop Florists. About 1:30 yesterday morning, Brackeen was already there, preparing to butter up his girlfriend, Lenise Hicks. "Usually I wait till the last minute to do everything," said Brackeen, 21, a manager in the computer department at Comcast's Northeast Philadelphia call center.
NEWS
February 15, 2000 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia state Rep. Michael Horsey might be about to feel some "flower power. " After more than two years and several attempts to collect a $600 overdue florist bill from Horsey, a capital-area florist is flexing its legal muscle. As a result, a Cumberland County judge has issued a contempt of court citation and ordered the posey-passing Horsey to appear at a contempt hearing in Carlisle March 31. Horsey says he's working on settling the issue. "My intent is to resolve it before it goes any further," he said.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
Whoever broke into the Charles Kremp 3rd Florist Shop on Davisville Road in Willow Grove left with more than $2,500 worth of office equipment and merchandise. They left with Pedro, an Amazon parrot that had been a friend of the Kremp family, staff and customers for more than 20 years. According to Scott Kremp, general manager of the shop and son of owner Charles Kremp 3d, the bird is a member of an endangered species that cannot be exported from the Amazon. Pedro is valued at between $2,500 and $3,000, according to Kremp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2008
In February, too many of us stampede to florists for the wrong reasons: guilt and obligation. Here's a flower shop to visit for pleasure. La Petite Fleur, in Glenside, isn't primarily a retail florist. The business bills itself as a one-stop shop for frou-frou event planning, offering "sophisticated style advice" to a clientele that entertains at ritzy Center City venues. If you have the means, they'll do the decorating, custom-design some invitations, wrangle a photographer and more.
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NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gerald Catania, 77, of South Philadelphia, co-owner of Ten Pennies, a popular floral shop, died of natural causes Saturday, June 19, at Pennsylvania Hospital. Anna Catania said she would arrange the flowers - white orchids, roses and Casablanca lilies - for her husband's funeral because "he deserves the best. " She called Mr. Catania "one in a million," a husband who could name her favorite lipstick color and recognize her presence by the scent of her signature Chanel Coco Mademoiselle perfume.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Tucked between the Convention Center and the Vine Street Expressway is a patch of Center City that time and development forgot. Its blocks are veined with cobbled alleys whose names have almost disappeared from the Philadelphia map: Watts, Florist, Clarion, Spring. In contrast to the snoozy monoculture that is the Convention Center, the little enclave is packed with humming workshops and rowhouses. This is probably how much of downtown Philadelphia looked in the early 20th century, before the triumph of the car, before fragmented blocks were consolidated into neat, developer-friendly parcels.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Malinda Swain has "a thing" about nature, snowy white paper, handmade or recycled anything - and the kind of solitude others dread. She jokingly calls the hours, days, and weeks spent alone in her suburban studio folding recycled copy paper into three-dimensional flowers "my solitary confinement. " Lock us up, please! The studio is in a funky old carriage house overlooking the tennis court at her father and stepmother's Haverford estate. Says Swain, 32, an artist from Brisbane, Australia: "It's quite lovely to sit here and drink tea and listen to music and fold.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Still struggling in the postrecession, local flower shops aren't just competing with supermarkets, discounters, and do-it-yourselfers. They're fighting to survive as a growing number of online middlemen known as "order-gatherers" sweep into the marketplace and take orders local florists used to receive. Sounds like an old story: Brick-and-mortar stores battle booming Internet competitors. But florists say these third-party retailers are using deceptive advertising and failing to give consumers a fair deal.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
Around noon Thursday, during a lull in the storm predicted to dump a foot or more of snow outside his door, Jeffrey Sklute took a break and sized up the situation. Many of the 20 or so workers at his Yardley Flower Co. feverishly cut and arranged roses while others answered ringing phones. His delivery vans, however, were idle. "Everything is kind of working against us, but we're doing the best we can," said Sklute, a florist for decades in lower Bucks County. "We'll probably be here till midnight.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
B RITTANY GILLESPIE, 30, of Roxborough, is CEO and lead designer for Petals Lane, a florist and wedding/special-events planner on Ridge Avenue near Harmon Road, Roxborough. Her husband, Michael Phinney, 32, takes care of the books and the event setup and breakdown work. I spoke with Gillespie. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: My husband and I worked at Robertson's in Chestnut Hill and there was no way to move up in the business. We were dating at the time and we just decided to start our own business.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel J. Carboni, 89, of Holmesburg, a florist and father of 13, died at home Tuesday, Feb. 28, of heart failure. Mr. Carboni grew up in Holmesburg with five older siblings. After completing eighth grade, he dropped out of school and held a series of jobs, including working on a pig farm and a chicken farm, his daughter Kathleen Heron said. During World War II, he served in the Navy as a signalman aboard the destroyer escort William T. Powell in the North Atlantic. Before shipping overseas, he married Mary Hartwell.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrick Kelly can't imagine what it's going to be like Wednesday when film crews show up at his flower shop to shoot a scene for a movie, starring, of all people, porn starlet Bree Olson, NSync singer Joey Fatone, and Danica McKellar, i.e. Winnie Cooper from the long-running TV show The Wonder Years . "They'll be coming at about 6 or 7 a.m," said Kelly, owner of Stein's, a Mayfair fixture officially known as Stein Your Florist Co. McKellar...
NEWS
January 16, 2011 | By John Shiffman, Inquirer Staff Writer
TUCSON, Ariz. - The scene of the crime is a suburban strip mall as typical as any in America. Anchored by the Safeway, it includes a Walgreens, a florist, a dry cleaner, a nail salon, a pizzeria, a barber shop, a cell-phone store, and, reflecting the neighborhood's many retirees, a place to buy hearing aids. "Arizona is kind of a hotbed right now, but this could have happened anywhere," said Jeff Edwards, a driver for the florist. "Tucson should be known for our nice weather, not this.
NEWS
April 10, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Catherine P. Cairone, 88, of the Swampoodle section of North Philadelphia, a hardworking, feisty civil servant who was known affectionately as the "first lady of Traffic Court," died of heart failure Sunday at home. The former Catherine Carsello was proud of her North Philadelphia roots. As a youngster, she worked in her father's hardware store on 22d Street. She graduated in 1938 from Simon Gratz High School, where she was a gymnast. She married Joseph A. Cairone Jr. in 1943, and the couple had two children.
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