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Flower Garden

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NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Ula Ilnytzky and Associated Press
NEW YORK — Claude Monet's beloved flower and water gardens in the north of France are world-famous. But for those unable to visit the artist's home, a trip to the Bronx over the next several months will offer a taste of Monet's indisputably radiant living masterpiece — a riotous display of color, plant variety, and landscape design. "Monet's Garden" at the New York Botanical Garden evokes Monet's lush garden at Giverny, the impressionist's home from 1883 until his death in 1926.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The great flowering of the Bucks County courthouse grew from an idea planted after the building became smoke-free in 1993. Scores of employees were chased outside to catch a cigarette. Puffing away, they stared at the unsightly mounds of dirt in the flower beds. "We joked about using the space to plant something," said Leslie Fitzpatrick, a county employee who works for Information Systems. "Someone joked about planting tomatoes and lettuce and growing our own sandwiches. " The idea took root during the great adoption battle of 1994.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
In a fit of rage, the president of a Philadelphia security firm slit the throats of his wife's dolls, gouged out their eyes and buried the dolls in a flower garden with their heads poking out, his wife's lawyer said yesterday. The husband, identified by police as Garnett Littlepage, owner of Scotlandyard Security in Philadelphia, was arrested early Thursday after he held police at bay for more than six hours while holed up in his lavish home on Yarrow Court in Williamstown, N.J. During the standoff, Littlepage splashed gasoline on the house and threatened to torch it, police said.
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a warm summer rain drenched the lush acres at Longwood Gardens on a recent morning, 16-year-old Mary Spada stood in a greenhouse and tended tanks brimming with water lilies and lotuses. "This flower smells like baby lotion with coconut," she said as she pruned a spiky pink bloom and skimmed algae from the surface of the water with a net. Like many teens who have summer jobs, Spada and nine other students from vocational high schools in Philadelphia are getting their hands dirty.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | By Sally McCabe, FOR THE INQUIRER
My children have absolutely no idea that gardening in the city is not the norm. They haven't a clue that in other places soil can be a foot deep, that trees grow without someone's planting them, and that most people don't share their garden space with 50 other people. Teaching children to garden in the city is rewarding and fun, but it would be a lot easier if gardening books assumed conditions that were a little closer to our reality. Well, maybe the manuals haven't caught up with us, but several children's storybooks have.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant Easter gifts. If you're like my sister, who received Easter plants from her kids and grandkids, you may be wondering what to do now that blooms have faded. Whether flowering shrubs, bulbs, or lilies, figure out their basic growing requirements - sun or shade, moist or dry soil. What, no gardening books? You have a great many sources - the Internet, as well as Q&A services through the Greater Philadelphia Gardens member organizations: http://www.greaterphiladelphiagardens.org/gardens.asp - to help you pick the best spot to plant.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
There is no time for gardeners to sit around this month. We'll all be hoping for fine weekends, followed by rain during the week. April is one of the best months for planting many things - trees, shrubs, perennials, roses, some vegetable seeds and seedlings. If you're planning to move plants around, do it as early as possible this month. With shrubs and trees, the key is not to do it too late, when new leaves already are expanding on deciduous plants and new growth is obvious on evergreens.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | By Andy Wallace and Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
David Weeks Jr., 62, of North Philadelphia, founder and pastor of Shalom Baptist Church in Logan and president of the Philadelphia Baptist Ministers Conference, died of heart failure Monday at Albert Einstein Medical Center. Born in Columbia, S.C., Mr. Weeks moved to Philadelphia with his family in 1942. He graduated from Benjamin Franklin High School in 1954 and studied theology at Philadelphia College of Bible. Ordained in 1955, he formed Shalom Baptist Church shortly afterward and guided its growth, from 30 members to more than 700. "He was a fiery preacher and well-read," his friend and fellow pastor, the Rev. William L. Banks, said yesterday.
FOOD
September 10, 1986 | By LIBBY GOLDSTEIN, Special to the Daily News
Five hundred or so gardeners, most of them prize winners, attended last nights' City Gardens Contest awards ceremony at the Port of History Museum. Amidst cheers and tears of joy winning gardeners received gift certificates from Burpee and Twilley Seed Companies and from Primnex Garden Centers in an absolute cornucopia of contest categories. DEMONSTRATION GARDEN CONTEST Senator Vincent Fumo (D. Phila.) presented the prizes in the Penn State Urban Gardening Program, Demonstration Garden Contest, now in its ninth year.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
I N THE SPRING and summer, Marie Zienkewicz, 89, could often be seen on the patio of her apartment in a sprawling, lush Bucks County complex watering her prim flower garden. But Tuesday night, authorities say, the senior citizen's peaceful existence came to a violent end. A bullet from a gunbattle between police and an apparently unhinged resident there found its way into the woman's apartment and killed her. "He didn't solve anything. His life's over," resident Barbara Sussman, 65, said of Andrew G. Cairns, 49, the man accused of barricading himself in the apartment above Zienkewicz's at Jefferson on the Creek apartments, on Street Road near Davisville in Warminster.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant Easter gifts. If you're like my sister, who received Easter plants from her kids and grandkids, you may be wondering what to do now that blooms have faded. Whether flowering shrubs, bulbs, or lilies, figure out their basic growing requirements - sun or shade, moist or dry soil. What, no gardening books? You have a great many sources - the Internet, as well as Q&A services through the Greater Philadelphia Gardens member organizations: http://www.greaterphiladelphiagardens.org/gardens.asp - to help you pick the best spot to plant.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
I N THE SPRING and summer, Marie Zienkewicz, 89, could often be seen on the patio of her apartment in a sprawling, lush Bucks County complex watering her prim flower garden. But Tuesday night, authorities say, the senior citizen's peaceful existence came to a violent end. A bullet from a gunbattle between police and an apparently unhinged resident there found its way into the woman's apartment and killed her. "He didn't solve anything. His life's over," resident Barbara Sussman, 65, said of Andrew G. Cairns, 49, the man accused of barricading himself in the apartment above Zienkewicz's at Jefferson on the Creek apartments, on Street Road near Davisville in Warminster.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Ula Ilnytzky and Associated Press
NEW YORK — Claude Monet's beloved flower and water gardens in the north of France are world-famous. But for those unable to visit the artist's home, a trip to the Bronx over the next several months will offer a taste of Monet's indisputably radiant living masterpiece — a riotous display of color, plant variety, and landscape design. "Monet's Garden" at the New York Botanical Garden evokes Monet's lush garden at Giverny, the impressionist's home from 1883 until his death in 1926.
NEWS
August 21, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jennifer Ryan doesn't keep records, but something unusual has been happening in her Roxborough community garden the last couple of years. "The mulberries are dropping earlier," she says. "We notice because it's a giant mess. " It's too soon to tell whether Ryan's mulberry mess is related to changing climate patterns. Best to watch it for another century or so. Zoe Panchen did the next best thing: She looked back. Panchen, a June graduate of the Longwood Graduate Program in Public Horticulture at the University of Delaware, spent the last two years researching 150 years of plant and climate records in the Philadelphia area for her master's degree thesis.
LIVING
April 3, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Debbie Cox often jokes that she has the best seat in the house. As receptionist in the 11-month-old West Grove corporate headquarters for Dansko, the footwear firm, she has a clear view of the giant green wall with lilting waterfall that dominates the 2 1/2-story atrium. "It's very relaxing," Cox says of the 20-by-22-foot wall, which is tufted with tropical plants and bathed in natural light. Dansko's green wall is technically called a biofilter or biowall. Plants grown hydroponically - without soil - remove carbon dioxide and volatile organic chemicals from the air, filter them through bare roots, and, using beneficial microbes, break them down into benign components.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Fountains, gardens, flower markets and shops will help create a Parisian atmosphere tomorrow and Saturday at the Peter Becker Community's 18th annual flower show, "Postcards From Paris. " Residents of the retirement community have painted an assortment of backdrops to give the feel of quaint French streets or bustling boulevards, show officials said. Visitors will recognize the Champs-Elysees, Montmartre, Notre Dame, and other places familiar to tourists in the City of Light. Two round-trip tickets to Paris will be given as door prizes.
NEWS
March 3, 2000 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
The plaque he's kept on the livingroom mantelpiece for the last six years says it all: "Achievement Award to Henry A. Sharp with heartfelt gratitude for his efforts in the interest of his community. We, the members of the Addison Street Block Club hereby present to you this plaque as a token of our appreciation. " Hank Sharp, a former aerospace engineer and World War II veteran who helped transform a vacant lot on his street into a prize-winning garden, died Tuesday. He was 74 and was a lifelong West Philadelphian.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
In a fit of rage, the president of a Philadelphia security firm slit the throats of his wife's dolls, gouged out their eyes and buried the dolls in a flower garden with their heads poking out, his wife's lawyer said yesterday. The husband, identified by police as Garnett Littlepage, owner of Scotlandyard Security in Philadelphia, was arrested early Thursday after he held police at bay for more than six hours while holed up in his lavish home on Yarrow Court in Williamstown, N.J. During the standoff, Littlepage splashed gasoline on the house and threatened to torch it, police said.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | By Andy Wallace and Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
David Weeks Jr., 62, of North Philadelphia, founder and pastor of Shalom Baptist Church in Logan and president of the Philadelphia Baptist Ministers Conference, died of heart failure Monday at Albert Einstein Medical Center. Born in Columbia, S.C., Mr. Weeks moved to Philadelphia with his family in 1942. He graduated from Benjamin Franklin High School in 1954 and studied theology at Philadelphia College of Bible. Ordained in 1955, he formed Shalom Baptist Church shortly afterward and guided its growth, from 30 members to more than 700. "He was a fiery preacher and well-read," his friend and fellow pastor, the Rev. William L. Banks, said yesterday.
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