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Flower Power

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1987 | By SHARLA FELDSCHER, Special to the Daily News
Are you taking the kids to the Flower Show this weekend? If so, plan wisely. The exhibits will intrigue even the youngest visitors, even preschoolers. Especially interesting are a scene about the Wizard of Oz and a look back to prehistoric times. There's also a copy of a garden visited by George Washington, and a visual trip into the world of "The Wind in the Willows," the popular children's classic. The show is a good opportunity for learning together. Don't just look at the exhibits: Talk about them.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Talk about a caffeine buzz: A new study says honeybees get a shot of caffeine from certain flowers, and it perks up their memory. That spurs them to return to the same type of plant, boosting its prospects for pollination and the future of the plant species. Maybe it shouldn't be a surprise that one of the flowers is the coffee plant. Its nectar offers about as much caffeine concentration as a cup of instant coffee, according to researchers. But some citrus plants serve caffeine too, albeit in lower concentrations.
NEWS
April 10, 1995
The whole, darn winter seemed to go out like a lamb. (What are we supposed to do with the bags of salt?) So the karate chop comes when? The first week of April - arctic winds, cops directing traffic in mittens, nighttime temperatures in the 20s. We were happy to see that - except for some weak-kneed magnolias - the flower world didn't close down in protest. Along the replanted stretch of Vine, just beyond Logan Square, the trees remain in full, loyal bloom. And the daffodils have been troupers, keeping their sunny sides irrepressibly up. The forsythia, too. Soon, we see by the schedule printed in last week's Magazine, the trout lily will be out. Then, just after the holidays, the Japanese maple, the white royal azalea and wave after wave of the common garden tulip.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Amy Westfeldt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Who said plants can't talk? In one mystery in Burlington City last week, the petals of some stolen geraniums left clues more valuable than words. Burlington City police followed a path of geranium petals from a home where they were reported stolen to a nearby property. And there they found not only geraniums, but petunias and other plants and garden accessories - including a bamboo bird cage - reported taken from four homes in the neighborhood. Police recovered some of the plants from the house where the petal trail ended in the 200 block of Elm Avenue.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | BY ED VOVES, Special to the Daily News
MAKING PEACE By MaryLouise Oates. Warner Books / $19.95 The 1960s were a time of high ideals and of getting high. It was the era of flower power and protest songs, when the passionate politics of the young changed everything - and nothing. MaryLouise Oates was a journalist during the 1960s. In her novel, she presents a jarring view of that decade as a time when revolution was proclaimed and then prevented. Oates' story is set in 1967. Anti-war sentiment against the U.S. involvement in Vietnam is beginning to overflow the carefully tended limits of earlier dissent.
NEWS
March 3, 1996
Ben Franklin flies his kite above three homey city rowhouses that are landscaped with window box roses and daffodils, dwarf inkberry hedgerows, willow oaks, a Japanese cherry tree and a Belgium block walkway. Boom! The kite is struck by lightning, generating voltage that activates strings of white holiday lights strung across this comfortable neighborhood tableau. It's Philadelphia at its most irresistible self, as portrayed in its flower show, which wraps up today at the Convention Center.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A garden of gold flutters on the horizon like a mirage. One wave of flowers follows another, a sporadic but exuberant parade of blossoms that readily inspires a smile. Welcome to Cherry Hill's Route 70, where eight miles of wildflowers are abloom between lanes of concrete and 60,000 daily vehicles. "Residents love it; environmentalists love it; I love it," says Mayor Bernie Platt, who championed the pilot plantings, along with State Sen. James Beach (D., Camden). The effort cost between $8,000 and $10,000, all of it from donations, including from township police officers and firefighters.
NEWS
May 14, 2008 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's a little secret. Barbara Pomerantz murders plants. Not intentionally, mind you. The president of the Rittenhouse Square Flower Market Association really has tried to keep her dieffenbachia and African violets alive. She just doesn't have the knack. And this worried her in 2000, when she was invited to join the all-volunteer association. After all, the group has a long, honorable tradition to uphold. It's been around since 1914 - one of the city's oldest traditions.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Season after season, the vaunted Parisian designers have worked their fashion magic. In their spring ready-to-wear collections, which concluded Wednesday, the French seemed to be conjuring up one big return to the 1970s, with hippie looks skipping down one runway after another. But then, as the shows progressed and the season began to take shape, it became clear that the collections, despite the hip-huggers, bell-bottoms and granny dresses, were about more than just recycled 1970s clothes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The Philadelphia Marathon is the official start of the cold-weather running season, so in honor of the Olympian efforts sure to be on display next Sunday, we turn our attention to bold running/yoga tights - because at Mile 23, a little floral action goes a long way in lifting both spirits and legs. The trendlet Whether looping Kelly Drive or repeating squats ad nauseam at the neighborhood barre studio, you'll be sure to see your fair share of colorful and color-blocked running and yoga tights.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Olson, a horticulturist and co-owner of Farm 51, a West Philadelphia vegetable garden, spends his days navigating all the familiar obstacles that come with farming on vacant lots: limited water access, soil contamination, land tenure, and security concerns. But these days his harvest is fewer turnips, more tulips. Last fall, he and business partner Erica Maust launched Chicory, an urban flower farm and design studio on two quarter-acre parcels, one in West Philadelphia and another in Roxborough.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The Philadelphia Marathon is the official start of the cold-weather running season, so in honor of the Olympian efforts sure to be on display next Sunday, we turn our attention to bold running/yoga tights - because at Mile 23, a little floral action goes a long way in lifting both spirits and legs. The trendlet Whether looping Kelly Drive or repeating squats ad nauseam at the neighborhood barre studio, you'll be sure to see your fair share of colorful and color-blocked running and yoga tights.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
After growing out of my Hawaiian shorts-suit obsession back in the 1980s, I let most of the floral prints in my wardrobe go. The big blooms were just too busy for my burgeoning minimalist tastes. Not only were those flowery designs loud, but they also came with too many rules. Sheer peony blouses were cheap-girl no-nos. Patterns always matched. Colors never clashed. And after Labor Day, all things hyacinth- and hydrangea-covered were buried in the back of the closet. It's no wonder I'm a fan of this spring's verdant vibe.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Talk about a caffeine buzz: A new study says honeybees get a shot of caffeine from certain flowers, and it perks up their memory. That spurs them to return to the same type of plant, boosting its prospects for pollination and the future of the plant species. Maybe it shouldn't be a surprise that one of the flowers is the coffee plant. Its nectar offers about as much caffeine concentration as a cup of instant coffee, according to researchers. But some citrus plants serve caffeine too, albeit in lower concentrations.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A garden of gold flutters on the horizon like a mirage. One wave of flowers follows another, a sporadic but exuberant parade of blossoms that readily inspires a smile. Welcome to Cherry Hill's Route 70, where eight miles of wildflowers are abloom between lanes of concrete and 60,000 daily vehicles. "Residents love it; environmentalists love it; I love it," says Mayor Bernie Platt, who championed the pilot plantings, along with State Sen. James Beach (D., Camden). The effort cost between $8,000 and $10,000, all of it from donations, including from township police officers and firefighters.
NEWS
May 31, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Philadelphia, people pilfer peonies, hijack hydrangeas, and abduct azaleas. Victims don't usually report this dirty crime, so no one knows how common it is. But every spring, neighbors trade tales of purloined plants. "It's just irritating, because you're like, 'Really, they're going to steal plants now?' You almost can't have anything nice in front of your house because it's going to get smashed or ruined," said Tara Martello, an occupational therapist who lives in the city's Fairmount section.
NEWS
May 14, 2008 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's a little secret. Barbara Pomerantz murders plants. Not intentionally, mind you. The president of the Rittenhouse Square Flower Market Association really has tried to keep her dieffenbachia and African violets alive. She just doesn't have the knack. And this worried her in 2000, when she was invited to join the all-volunteer association. After all, the group has a long, honorable tradition to uphold. It's been around since 1914 - one of the city's oldest traditions.
NEWS
January 13, 2008 | By Todd Gitlin
This year will be chock-full of 1968 commemorations. Deservedly so, because that was a pivotal year in which the convulsions of a decade converged and the country slouched over the edge of a precipice. It was, after all, the year of the Tet offensive in Vietnam; Walter Cronkite's televised farewell to victory in that wretched war; the My Lai massacre (unknown until the next year); Eugene McCarthy's presidential run; Columbia University's uprising; President Johnson's decision not to run for a second full term; the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination; scores of subsequent riots; Robert F. Kennedy's assassination; the Chicago Democratic Convention riot; the Miss America protest in Atlantic City; Richard Nixon's "Southern Strategy" and election; and, for good measure, the first manned voyages in the Apollo program - not to mention Prague Spring, the French student uprising, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and, in Mexico City, the massacre of protesting students and the black power salutes of Olympic athletes John Carlos and Tommie Smith.
NEWS
September 30, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The hibiscus blooms into trumpets of floral beauty. "But it's also stubborn as hell," says Nongyao "Moon" Krapugthong. "Just like me. " "The flower is so delicate it won't live if you cut it," the Bangkok-born chef says. "But the plant itself is a survivor. Take just one stick and put it in the ground, and it will grow in the sand or mud. " After two surgeries for breast cancer in 2001 and 2002, Krapugthong knows a few things about surviving a cruel cut. So it's little wonder the Bangkok-born chef gave her Manayunk restaurant the Thai name for hibiscus: Chabaa.
NEWS
June 1, 2006
AS WE CELEBRATED Memorial Day and pondered its significance, it is difficult to comprehend the rudeness that commencement speaker John McCain had to endure at the New School in New York. I hope that the indecorous young collegian who dishonored Sen. McCain gets the opportunity to read Christine Flowers' persuasively penned May 26 Daily News op-ed. Then her education would be complete. David Lynch Willow Grove
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