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Flower Shop

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NEWS
December 9, 2008 | By B.G. Kelley
This Christmas, there will be no poinsettias, no wreaths, no bouquets or centerpieces flying out the door of a family flower shop a block from where I live, in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia. Its doors shut two weeks ago. It's the economy, right? Well, not entirely. There's much more behind the disappearance of the neighborhood florist. Christmas was once a rainmaking holiday for family florists. I know: My pop was a Philly florist for 50 years, first in a tiny neighborhood called Paradise, and then in Roxborough.
NEWS
February 15, 1987 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Moreland Zoning Hearing Board has voted unanimously to give Goodman Properties the variances it needs to build a flower shop at 1115 N. Easton Road. At a hearing Thursday night, the board granted the Jenkintown development company variances permitting a larger sign, a smaller back yard and a reduction in the number of parking spaces required by local zoning. After the hearing, Bruce Goodman, a spokesman for Goodman Properties, said construction was expected to begin in April.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Music is abloom among the petunias and geraniums at Pennypack Flowers in Bustleton this summer. For Tony Cinkutis, this blossoming of music is a chance to "give something back to the community" that has supported his family's business for 60 years. Cinkutis, 40, is sponsoring free under-the-stars concerts every Tuesday - weather permitting - between 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. at the Pennypack Flowers Culture Center. The concerts are played from a bandstand and large gazebo erected outside the flower shop at Bustleton Avenue and Fulmer Street.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
A two-alarm fire that destroyed a Bustleton flower shop and nursery Friday night "wiped out 15 years of hard work," owner Anthony Cinkutis said Wednesday. But Cinkutis, 39, vowed to rebuild the business. Meanwhile, the city Fire Marshal's Office continued its probe of the fire at Pennypack Flowers Inc., 9708 Bustleton Ave. A fire department spokesman said Wednesday that the origin of the blaze still had not been determined. The fire, reported at 7:35 p.m., quickly engulfed the one-story and three- story structures occupied by the business and a residence occupied by Cinkutis and forced the evacuation of the adjacent Plaza Apartments.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Delaware Valley Wholesale Florists bills itself as one of the top distributors in the country, importing flowers from Israel, Mexico, the African or Asian jungles and other exotic locations around the world. From the King Protea - a Hawaiian species that bears a close resemblance to Audrey II, the people-eating star of Little Shop of Horrors - to Thailand's dendrobium - a cluster of small purple and white orchids - the Sewell Townhsip company has access to nearly every species known to man. "There are literally hundreds of flowers out there and millions of variations," said Bonnie Dewey, the spokeswoman for the company.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angered by commercial encroachment on residential areas, members of the Somerton Civic Association have decided they are going to fight. After checking the balance in the association's treasury - $3,731.33 - the 45 members at Tuesday's meeting voted unanimously to underwrite the costs of a zoning fight against a flower shop at 746 Byberry Rd. The property is zoned residential, but the owner is seeking a variance. The flower shop, which reportedly has been offered for sale as a commercial property at a price of $339,000, is one of four such intrusions in the neighborhood, according to civic association president Mary Jane Hazell.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It looks like Christmas in the horticulture shop at the Center for Arts and Technology Brandywine Campus. The annual student holiday flower show and shop is now open to the public. In addition to a display of holiday arrangements created by students in the horticultural program, holiday arrangements using fresh evergreens, wreaths and poinsettias are for sale. The show will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow at the school, 1635 E. Lincoln Highway in Coatesville.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2002 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
Col. Dan Alleva will be selling the contents of a local flower shop tomorrow, including all types of vases in china, glass, pottery, wood and more, brass and tin ware items, baskets, topiaries, urns. Also being sold is a large selection of prints and framed artwork, including works by Chester County artist Dane Tilghman, and many unframed color plates by internationally acclaimed wildflower and naturalist watercolor artist Maryrose Wampler of Bloomington, Ind. You'll find photography, both black and white and color, up for bid, with subjects ranging from Princess Grace Kelly and family, President Truman, President and Mrs. Eisenhower, President Kennedy with Bishop Sheen, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Pete Rose and others.
NEWS
October 6, 1995 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph D. Sayres, 67, of Richboro, who founded a flower shop in Juniata Park almost by accident, died Wednesday of cancer in Doylestown Hospital. Born and raised in Swampoodle, Mr. Sayres attended school through the eighth grade. During World War II, he was an auto mechanic in the Army, serving in Hawaii. After the war, he worked for Origlio Beer Distributors for 19 years. When he was laid off in 1968, he began selling cut flowers on a street corner at Front Street and Hunting Park Avenue.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | By Andrew Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Russell L. Medinger, 84, of Wyndmoor, who owned and operated a flower shop in Chestnut Hill for 45 years, died Sunday at the Ambler Rest Center. Mr. Medinger was active in the business community, working to improve the Chestnut Hill shopping district by providing parking lots, restoring buildings, lining the street with plantings and promoting holiday events with parades, decorations, flower shows and the like. A slender man with a black mustache and an ever-present black derby, Mr. Medinger was a Chestnut Hill fixture, tending his flower shop at 8430 Germantown Ave. When his health declined in 1987, the shop closed.
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NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
In a conference room at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, Sam Lemheney unfurled a floor plan of the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show. He pointed out where, starting Saturday, visitors would enter the hall of the Convention Center, through a "Big Timber Lodge," with screens showcasing the year's theme, "Explore America," a celebration of the National Park Service's centennial. He dragged a finger up to the Find Your Park Pavilion, a ranger station. He mentioned a climbing wall, a model-train display, a butterfly habitat, a beer garden, a wine-tasting bar, and an expo of camping and hiking gear.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Lidia Hernandez took chairs down off tables and unrolled mats on the floor of her East Camden restaurant, Lupita's, preparing for the lunch customers, who start coming as early as 11 a.m. Down the block on Federal Street, Monica Herrera talked with a client in her accounting office, tax forms strewed on the table. Across the street, Grisel Nunez organized the day's deliveries in her flower shop, Nyla's, behind a window decorated with poinsettias and wreaths. Along Federal from 21st to 27th Streets, shop owners pulled up metal grates, hosed off sidewalks, piped music out from speakers, and set Christmas trees in front of storefronts.
NEWS
October 7, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
MANNY ANDRADE surrounded himself with flowers. At work, at home, everywhere he went. Even now, brightly colored geraniums line the sidewalk in front of his house in North Philly. They're in bloom, growing, just as Andrade was. He told friends in recent months that he had "finally arrived" in life: a marriage, a home he renovated himself, a schedule that allowed him to eat dinner with his family every night. But two heartless punks took all of that away, gunning down a family man on his way home from work.
NEWS
September 23, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When Julie Beddingfield was considering whether to open a bookstore in downtown Haddonfield, she crunched numbers, listened to experts, and studied pedestrian flow. She also pondered the wisdom of leaving behind a law career for brick-and-mortar bookselling in a smartphone, Snapchat world. "So I asked Remi Fortunato, the borough's retail recruiter, whether I was crazy," Beddingfield recalls. Says Fortunato, who works for a nonprofit downtown promotional agency called the Partnership for Haddonfield: "I was honest with her. I told her that a bookstore would be an excellent asset and was needed, but that she couldn't just open it. She'd have to work it. " That hasn't been a problem for Beddingfield, whose Inkwood Books - a cheerful literary oasis for the whole family - debuted in June on Kings Highway East.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
When is it acceptable for a mayor to strip off his pants on stage in front of a roomful of constituents? When the borough is Jenkintown, the mayor is Ed Foley , and the occasion is a Season Two premiere screening of ABC's hit show The Goldbergs. Under those circumstances Tuesday night, Foley's stunt - an homage to the show's Murray Goldberg, an irascible 1980s father who usually appears in tighty whiteys - got a huge round of applause from the crowd of nearly 300. The show is based on writer Adam F. Goldberg's childhood in Jenkintown.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
MY MISSION? To stake out the blocked bike lane outside the 7-Eleven near the corner of 22nd and Lombard streets. I eyed the stoop at a closed flower shop across the street, perfect for unobstructed surveillance. I downloaded a counting app to keep track of all the bikers riding by. I was about to grab a Big Gulp and settle in, when the first culprit pulled into the bike lane and parked. A woman, outwardly healthy looking, stepped out of a shiny Mercedes with a handicapped-parking placard dangling from the mirror and sashayed into the store.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Bristol Riverside Theatre's production of Little Shop of Horrors is affectionate and fun, and you and I both know why. No, the show doesn't have any of its contemporaries' trademarks: not Sondheim's sophisticated lyricism, Webber's puffed-up self-importance, Kander and Ebb's slickness, or Ahrens and Flaherty's jaunty appeal. Nonetheless, it's a closet favorite in the hearts of several recent generations of musical-theater lovers. Maybe you first saw or performed it onstage as a kid, watched the Frank Oz-directed film featuring Rick Moranis and Steve Martin, or caught the Roger Corman original and spotted a young Jack Nicholson.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ty Slovak walked from the van up to the front door of the Radnor Township house Wednesday, both hands clutching a small brown teddy bear to his chest. Two shiny green "Get Well Soon" balloons attached to the bear floated above his not-quite-5-foot-4 frame. He raised a hand and knocked a few too many times. A voice from the side of the house said to come around. A driver sat in the van, ready to give him instructions if he needed. Ty hesitated, but he followed the voice to the side.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
By B.G. Kelley The spirit of springtime will be reborn this weekend as the Pennsylvania Convention Center opens its doors to the famous Philadelphia Flower Show. A civic treasure for 184 years, the Flower Show, with its dogwoods, cherry blossoms, daffodils, orchids, and more, sets in motion the seasonal rhythms of planting and gardening for green-thumb enthusiasts. I've been going to the show, on and off, for 40 years, and each time the overriding message never eludes me: Flowers bring a promise of renewal to our lives.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel J. Carboni, 89, of Holmesburg, a florist and father of 13, died at home Tuesday, Feb. 28, of heart failure. Mr. Carboni grew up in Holmesburg with five older siblings. After completing eighth grade, he dropped out of school and held a series of jobs, including working on a pig farm and a chicken farm, his daughter Kathleen Heron said. During World War II, he served in the Navy as a signalman aboard the destroyer escort William T. Powell in the North Atlantic. Before shipping overseas, he married Mary Hartwell.
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