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NEWS
March 26, 1989
Spring arrived at an old Main Line estate to find enormous changes. The rolling lawns around the mansion are scarred with vast expanses of muddy earth where new homes soon will be built. A magnificent copper beech that adorned the property for generations had been cut down over the winter. The stone wall that once served as the entrance to the graceful old property was bulldozed away months ago, as were the evergreen plantings alongside it. Only a few forgotten rocks remain. Nobody, however, bothered to tell the crocuses.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
Let springtime begin, at least at the Civic Center, where the Philadelphia Flower Show will blossom for eight days beginning today. The theme of this year's show is "Kaleidoscope - The Wonderful World of Color," featuring color displays from the seasons of the year and from different eras. The show will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. today and next Sunday, and from 10 to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by Ellen DiPiazza
When Jack and Emily Aprill first covered 30 acres with plants that hummingbirds love, it was a hobby. For 19 years, however, they have let the public in to see the tiny birds as they pause to spend August amid the swamp hyacinths, salvia, cinnamon ferns and cardinal flowers.
LIVING
January 18, 1987 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
My flower-arranging capabilities have never gone far beyond the stuff-it- all-in-a-vase phase, and nine times out of 10 the flowers would have looked better if I had left them out in the garden or at the florist. Cheryl Monroe of West Chester, on the other hand, can take a dozen flowers, a simple vase, some filler greenery and within minutes create a delightful arrangement. She insists this ability is not inborn; often, she says, people just do not know what flowers to buy, what to put them in or how to take care of them.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Many of Pearl Bailey's VIP friends couldn't be on North Broad Street yesterday to bid a personal farewell to the show business legend. So they said their goodbyes with flowers. Among them were former President Gerald Ford and his wife Betty. "Pearl gave her incredible joy and talent to the world," read a card, addressed to Bailey's family, that accompanied a spray of flowers placed just to the left of the casket. "We will miss her," added the Fords, "but rejoice in having been permitted into her life.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | By B.G. Kelley
'There's power in flowers," my pop the florist forever preached. Flowers were a gift like other natural gifts - a full moon, the mountains, rainbows and sunsets. Flowers, he would remind me, are a steady force, softening even the toughest among us. Even roofers send their hearts in a vase. But most of all, my pop told me, flowers speak to the verities of the heart and soul: Honor, truth, love. God, he was right. One day long ago, as I was working side by side with him in his tiny flower shop in the Paradise section of the city, I was telling him I had taken out a French major at Temple, but there wasn't enough spark to turn on a pocket flashlight.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | By Caroline Meline
Flower lust is a condition in which a person craves the sight of flowers. She can't get enough. She is drawn like a bee into other people's gardens, where she surveys the blooming variety covetously to see what would work in her own yard. She haunts nurseries, where the proprietors quickly realize they are dealing with an addict and get to know her by name. When the gardening season ends, she consults catalogues and plans for spring. If she tries to get at the root of her obsession, it seems to be color itself she desires, not unlike the grandmother Baby Suggs in Toni Morrison's Beloved, who called for pink and pondered the orange square in her quilt.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Annual statice is wonderful for a variety of bouquets and projects because of its wide array of colors. Elise Payne grows bunches of statice in her community garden plot and has developed a small business drying and using it to decorate gift items. You should be able to purchase transplants next month, but Payne, of Strafford, Chester County, prefers to grow her statice from seed, sowing it inside on a windowsill or under light units during the last week of April. Like globe amaranth, annual statice is sensitive to cold, damp soil, so Payne suggests waiting until the first week of June to transplant the seedlings, unless you live in a sheltered location where the soil warms up quickly.
NEWS
September 10, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What we like: The Villanova shop sells bunches of fresh flowers, ideal to surprise a sweetheart, for just $10 every day. The colorful floral selections include carnations, mini-carnations, alstroemeria, limonium and monticasino aster. Flowers on the Avenue is a full-service store that for more than 20 years has offered garden-style arrangements customized for weddings and funerals as well as personalized get-well arrangements, bouquets for proms, and single stems for dance recitals and school award nights.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Do April snow showers bring May dead flowers? Weather forecasters say it'll do more than shower snow today. More like two to four inches. But the flowers should come through just fine, said Rick Lewandowski, curator at the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania. A spring snowfall won't create significant problems for people, either, because "most of the snow on the roads will just melt," said Accu-Weather meteorologist Laura Anderson. "On lawns and other non-paved surfaces there could be a couple of inches.
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NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she was growing up in Los Angeles in the 1930s, Yuriko Uyehara learned to drive the family car so that she could take her father, Naotaka, to a neighborhood where Japanese American fishing families lived. There, he collected shoes to take back to his cobbler's shop for repairs. By 1938, she had earned an associate's degree in accounting at Los Angeles City College. That normal life was lost when, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, she, her family, and other West Coast residents of Japanese heritage were imprisoned at the Rohwer Relocation Center near McGehee, Ark. Among her losses, Yuriko Uyehara could not practice the Japanese art of flower arranging, which she had happened upon in college.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015 | By Emma Jacobs, For The Inquirer
Quelle horreur! An hour and a half before the wedding, it's discovered there's been a miscommunication. Three daughters are in need of bouquets, not two. Claudia Roux, arranging the flowers for the ceremony in a narrow Elfreth's Alley rowhouse, shows no sign of apprehension. Instead, she builds an elegantly asymmetrical bundle of white and pink blooms as her assistant, Elizabeth Cohen, cuts a violet silk ribbon that came from a shop in the Montmartre neighborhood of Paris. Roux picked it up on her last trip there.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Plant more tomatoes -  and more of everything else! Garden centers are running some awesome sales now, and I've seen a lot of buy-one-get-one offers, especially with tomatoes. In fact, they're so cheap, you can afford to stick them in neglected parts of the garden and let them fend for themselves after some initial care. These usually are pretty leggy with small tomatoes, so plant them deep or sideways (we're not going for aesthetics here - the buried stem will grow more roots, making a stronger plant)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2015 | By Ellen D. Feld, For The Inquirer
Although we never celebrated Mother's Day when I was growing up, once I had my first child, my mother began sending me flowers every year on the previously scorned holiday. The last year we celebrated, she sent me an azalea that blooms like clockwork each Mother's Day. Yet when it comes to my garden, the azalea is not what most reminds me of her. That distinction belongs to my four rose bushes, which grow in all the wrong places. Three of them take up a quarter of my vegetable garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Pay attention to the weather forecast. This is the week we walk the line between frost and not-frost. In the city, we've already gotten the all-clear, but out in the 'burbs . . . hold off on planting transplants of tomatoes, peppers, and basil until the nighttime temps are in the mid-50s. (Refer to last week's column for best ways to test soil warmth.) Lots of people have jumped the gun on this, and the results are not pretty. In the meantime, feel free to plant seeds of any of your warm-season vegetables such as beans, squash, and cukes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Olson, a horticulturist and co-owner of Farm 51, a West Philadelphia vegetable garden, spends his days navigating all the familiar obstacles that come with farming on vacant lots: limited water access, soil contamination, land tenure, and security concerns. But these days his harvest is fewer turnips, more tulips. Last fall, he and business partner Erica Maust launched Chicory, an urban flower farm and design studio on two quarter-acre parcels, one in West Philadelphia and another in Roxborough.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WANT to live more than 100 years, the key word just might be love . That's what Frances Vann Lewis would have told you. When asked to what she attributed her long life, she had one simple answer: "Love everybody. " Not always a simple assignment in a world of increasing stress, you might say, but Frances - called "Nana" by friends and family - would have insisted on it. After all, she did it. Frances Vann Lewis, who worked for a Horn & Hardart restaurant on South Broad Street and for the former Graduate Hospital, a devoted churchwoman and family matriarch, died Friday at age 102. She was living in the Riverside Presbyterian Apartments in Center City, but had lived most of her life in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The return of the dinner jacket brings with it a new appreciation of one of menswear's swankiest accessories. The trendlet Lapel pins are undergoing a crafty revival as artisans fashion felt, ribbon, and organza into faux flowers perfect for pinning. This spring, look for the confident and well-coiffed dude to add a dose of petaled, pastel pizzazz to tuxedo jackets and linen blazers. Where's it come from? The boutonniere, of course. And these "buttonhole flowers" go back to the 16th century, when grooms wore them to ward off evil spirits.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | Christine M. Flowers, Daily News Columnist
IT'S POPULAR to say that age is just a number. I never understood that statement. Aside from being self-evident, the implication that age is irrelevant makes absolutely no sense. Age is a number that means a lot of things, including how much you have accomplished, experienced and, perhaps most importantly, the mistakes you've avoided making during a lifetime. But when we say "age is just a number," it's as if we're trying to minimize the negative perception of being "older. " I put that word in quotation marks because its connotation has evolved over recent decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2015 | A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Every spring, Philadelphia's cherry blossom trees begin their elegant, temporal bloom. And every spring, the Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia hosts the annual Subaru Cherry Blossom Festival, celebrating all aspects of Japanese culture. The festival takes place April 6 to 12, but officially kicks off with Tamagawa Taiko Drum and Dance Troupe performances, starting Saturday at the Painted Bride Art Center. Many people know about the fest: its observance of ohanami - the picnics beneath the blossoming trees - and events featuring traditional drum ensembles, culinary delights, and decorative celebrations.
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