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NEWS
March 26, 1989
Spring arrived at an old Main Line estate to find enormous changes. The rolling lawns around the mansion are scarred with vast expanses of muddy earth where new homes soon will be built. A magnificent copper beech that adorned the property for generations had been cut down over the winter. The stone wall that once served as the entrance to the graceful old property was bulldozed away months ago, as were the evergreen plantings alongside it. Only a few forgotten rocks remain. Nobody, however, bothered to tell the crocuses.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
Let springtime begin, at least at the Civic Center, where the Philadelphia Flower Show will blossom for eight days beginning today. The theme of this year's show is "Kaleidoscope - The Wonderful World of Color," featuring color displays from the seasons of the year and from different eras. The show will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. today and next Sunday, and from 10 to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Godshalk is out to demystify the art of floral design. It's not that hard, she insists. "All you really need to do is pay attention to the flowers themselves - their shapes, their colors, where you want to put them - and then learn a few tricks. " A few tricks? Sounds like Julia Child suggesting we whip up a little dinner party. It's OK to laugh. The 66-year-old Godshalk is disarmingly, charmingly, earnest about this demystification thing, but given her talent and expertise, "a few tricks" qualifies as serious understatement.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by Ellen DiPiazza
When Jack and Emily Aprill first covered 30 acres with plants that hummingbirds love, it was a hobby. For 19 years, however, they have let the public in to see the tiny birds as they pause to spend August amid the swamp hyacinths, salvia, cinnamon ferns and cardinal flowers.
LIVING
January 18, 1987 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
My flower-arranging capabilities have never gone far beyond the stuff-it- all-in-a-vase phase, and nine times out of 10 the flowers would have looked better if I had left them out in the garden or at the florist. Cheryl Monroe of West Chester, on the other hand, can take a dozen flowers, a simple vase, some filler greenery and within minutes create a delightful arrangement. She insists this ability is not inborn; often, she says, people just do not know what flowers to buy, what to put them in or how to take care of them.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Many of Pearl Bailey's VIP friends couldn't be on North Broad Street yesterday to bid a personal farewell to the show business legend. So they said their goodbyes with flowers. Among them were former President Gerald Ford and his wife Betty. "Pearl gave her incredible joy and talent to the world," read a card, addressed to Bailey's family, that accompanied a spray of flowers placed just to the left of the casket. "We will miss her," added the Fords, "but rejoice in having been permitted into her life.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | By B.G. Kelley
'There's power in flowers," my pop the florist forever preached. Flowers were a gift like other natural gifts - a full moon, the mountains, rainbows and sunsets. Flowers, he would remind me, are a steady force, softening even the toughest among us. Even roofers send their hearts in a vase. But most of all, my pop told me, flowers speak to the verities of the heart and soul: Honor, truth, love. God, he was right. One day long ago, as I was working side by side with him in his tiny flower shop in the Paradise section of the city, I was telling him I had taken out a French major at Temple, but there wasn't enough spark to turn on a pocket flashlight.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | By Caroline Meline
Flower lust is a condition in which a person craves the sight of flowers. She can't get enough. She is drawn like a bee into other people's gardens, where she surveys the blooming variety covetously to see what would work in her own yard. She haunts nurseries, where the proprietors quickly realize they are dealing with an addict and get to know her by name. When the gardening season ends, she consults catalogues and plans for spring. If she tries to get at the root of her obsession, it seems to be color itself she desires, not unlike the grandmother Baby Suggs in Toni Morrison's Beloved, who called for pink and pondered the orange square in her quilt.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Annual statice is wonderful for a variety of bouquets and projects because of its wide array of colors. Elise Payne grows bunches of statice in her community garden plot and has developed a small business drying and using it to decorate gift items. You should be able to purchase transplants next month, but Payne, of Strafford, Chester County, prefers to grow her statice from seed, sowing it inside on a windowsill or under light units during the last week of April. Like globe amaranth, annual statice is sensitive to cold, damp soil, so Payne suggests waiting until the first week of June to transplant the seedlings, unless you live in a sheltered location where the soil warms up quickly.
NEWS
September 10, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What we like: The Villanova shop sells bunches of fresh flowers, ideal to surprise a sweetheart, for just $10 every day. The colorful floral selections include carnations, mini-carnations, alstroemeria, limonium and monticasino aster. Flowers on the Avenue is a full-service store that for more than 20 years has offered garden-style arrangements customized for weddings and funerals as well as personalized get-well arrangements, bouquets for proms, and single stems for dance recitals and school award nights.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2016
YOU KNOW what I really resent? I resent it when someone tells me I should vote for, or support, or give a pass to, someone because it will be a "historic moment. " Don't get me wrong. I'm as much a sucker for the grand and melodramatic gesture as anyone. Last weekend, I took my nephew to see the updated version of "Jungle Book," and I was reduced to sobs when the animals banded together to defend Mowgli. Heck, I still get a lump in my throat at that scene in "Spartacus" where all the other slaves rise up to protect Kirk Douglas from crucifixion by saying, "I am Spartacus.
NEWS
April 8, 2016
THE FIRST TIME I felt it, I was a first-year law student desperately trying to figure out why she was getting bottom-basement grades when she'd been on the honor roll most of her pampered life. It was three quarters into a difficult academic year, and I was almost ready to call it quits. The B-minuses and C-pluses were an embarrassment, and I told my mother I would honor Daddy's memory better if I didn't make a mockery of his profession by failing out of law school. That law school was Villanova, and I cursed every blessed corner of the place.
NEWS
April 1, 2016
IT'S NO SECRET I detest Donald Trump. I don't particularly hate the man, because it takes too much energy and effort to become enraged at people I don't know personally and will likely never meet, when more than enough humans are in my immediate orbit who fit the bill. He isn't evil, he isn't Hitler, he isn't the Angel of Death. The thing that repels me about Trump is the arrogance and bellicosity he inspires in his followers. It's hardly unprecedented, given our hardscrabble political history.
NEWS
March 30, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA SIGHTS Flower Show with a parks touch For nine days this month, visitors could hike from Independence National Historical Park to Acadia, Cape Cod, Shenandoah, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Olympia, and dozens of other national parks and historic sites - all within a few hours of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's 2016 Philadelphia Flower Show hosted 255,000 guests for "Explore America," a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.
NEWS
March 25, 2016
SOMETIMES, God speaks softly. He shows you the magnificence of his glory in the mewling of a newborn child, eyes still closed against the world but lungs fully operational. Other times, his anger is announced with obvious thunder, like when he sends a plague of locusts down upon recalcitrant heads (or sends PennDOT workers to repair some potholes in the middle of rush hour.) And then there are those moments when the good Lord credits us with all the intelligence we presumably have, and makes us connect the dots to find his message.
NEWS
March 18, 2016
IT'S BEEN a long time since I've written about the 2006 version of the Scottsboro Nine. About a decade ago, I wrote about them every few months, both during and after the investigation. The case, like Nosferatu, refused to die. But then, other things began to push the memory of that travesty of justice further back into the morning mist of North Carolina, and we went on with our lives. Until the next rape accusation reared its head, and suspicions started swirling about truth, vengeance and the intersection of political correctness and justice.
NEWS
March 17, 2016
It's still early to say what blooms will be on display at the 2017 PHS Philadelphia Flower Show, but tulips are a safe bet. The theme of the show is "Holland. " After this year's theme - a mind-bender for florists and landscapers trying to reconcile their national park-themed assignments with the tastes of visitors and potential customers - it may feel like a return to familiar ground. It should lend itself to relatable and colorful flower displays the way past themes such as Paris (2011)
NEWS
March 16, 2016
The 2016 PHS Philadelphia Flower Show is coming up roses. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's annual - and largest - fund-raiser drew its largest crowd in years, officials said Monday. Featuring an "Explore America" theme, a nod to the National Park Service's 100th anniversary, the show attracted an estimated 255,000 visitors. Officials said the attendance figure represents a 2 percent increase from last year's Disney-themed event, which drew an estimated 250,000. Marion McParland, PHS spokeswoman, said the Park Service offerings were critical in attracting visitors from within and beyond the city's borders.
NEWS
March 13, 2016
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society hosted the Philadelphia Flower Show Preview Party on March 4 at the Convention Center. It marked the 50th anniversary of the show, with this year's theme being "Explore America," celebrating the centennial of the National Park Service and the United States' majestic landscapes and rich history. More than 1,000 enjoyed the black-tie fund-raiser, which included an exclusive preview of the designs and displays of the Flower Show before it opened to the public, an award presentation, food and cocktails, and entertainment provided by "new-grass" band Sparkle Pony.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2016 | Signe Wilkinson, Editorial Cartoonist
After last year's Disney extravaganza - the emphasis on PHS Philadelphia Flower Show - this year's offering was a calm and earthy salute to the National Park Service. Especially in our current political celebration of all things divisive, it was reassuring to walk through exhibits featuring what all Americans are privileged to share: our spectacular natural beauty that previous generations have preserved for us and our children. Here are a few sketches from my visit.
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