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NEWS
March 26, 1989
Spring arrived at an old Main Line estate to find enormous changes. The rolling lawns around the mansion are scarred with vast expanses of muddy earth where new homes soon will be built. A magnificent copper beech that adorned the property for generations had been cut down over the winter. The stone wall that once served as the entrance to the graceful old property was bulldozed away months ago, as were the evergreen plantings alongside it. Only a few forgotten rocks remain. Nobody, however, bothered to tell the crocuses.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
Let springtime begin, at least at the Civic Center, where the Philadelphia Flower Show will blossom for eight days beginning today. The theme of this year's show is "Kaleidoscope - The Wonderful World of Color," featuring color displays from the seasons of the year and from different eras. The show will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. today and next Sunday, and from 10 to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by Ellen DiPiazza
When Jack and Emily Aprill first covered 30 acres with plants that hummingbirds love, it was a hobby. For 19 years, however, they have let the public in to see the tiny birds as they pause to spend August amid the swamp hyacinths, salvia, cinnamon ferns and cardinal flowers.
LIVING
January 18, 1987 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
My flower-arranging capabilities have never gone far beyond the stuff-it- all-in-a-vase phase, and nine times out of 10 the flowers would have looked better if I had left them out in the garden or at the florist. Cheryl Monroe of West Chester, on the other hand, can take a dozen flowers, a simple vase, some filler greenery and within minutes create a delightful arrangement. She insists this ability is not inborn; often, she says, people just do not know what flowers to buy, what to put them in or how to take care of them.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Many of Pearl Bailey's VIP friends couldn't be on North Broad Street yesterday to bid a personal farewell to the show business legend. So they said their goodbyes with flowers. Among them were former President Gerald Ford and his wife Betty. "Pearl gave her incredible joy and talent to the world," read a card, addressed to Bailey's family, that accompanied a spray of flowers placed just to the left of the casket. "We will miss her," added the Fords, "but rejoice in having been permitted into her life.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | By B.G. Kelley
'There's power in flowers," my pop the florist forever preached. Flowers were a gift like other natural gifts - a full moon, the mountains, rainbows and sunsets. Flowers, he would remind me, are a steady force, softening even the toughest among us. Even roofers send their hearts in a vase. But most of all, my pop told me, flowers speak to the verities of the heart and soul: Honor, truth, love. God, he was right. One day long ago, as I was working side by side with him in his tiny flower shop in the Paradise section of the city, I was telling him I had taken out a French major at Temple, but there wasn't enough spark to turn on a pocket flashlight.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | By Caroline Meline
Flower lust is a condition in which a person craves the sight of flowers. She can't get enough. She is drawn like a bee into other people's gardens, where she surveys the blooming variety covetously to see what would work in her own yard. She haunts nurseries, where the proprietors quickly realize they are dealing with an addict and get to know her by name. When the gardening season ends, she consults catalogues and plans for spring. If she tries to get at the root of her obsession, it seems to be color itself she desires, not unlike the grandmother Baby Suggs in Toni Morrison's Beloved, who called for pink and pondered the orange square in her quilt.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Annual statice is wonderful for a variety of bouquets and projects because of its wide array of colors. Elise Payne grows bunches of statice in her community garden plot and has developed a small business drying and using it to decorate gift items. You should be able to purchase transplants next month, but Payne, of Strafford, Chester County, prefers to grow her statice from seed, sowing it inside on a windowsill or under light units during the last week of April. Like globe amaranth, annual statice is sensitive to cold, damp soil, so Payne suggests waiting until the first week of June to transplant the seedlings, unless you live in a sheltered location where the soil warms up quickly.
NEWS
September 10, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What we like: The Villanova shop sells bunches of fresh flowers, ideal to surprise a sweetheart, for just $10 every day. The colorful floral selections include carnations, mini-carnations, alstroemeria, limonium and monticasino aster. Flowers on the Avenue is a full-service store that for more than 20 years has offered garden-style arrangements customized for weddings and funerals as well as personalized get-well arrangements, bouquets for proms, and single stems for dance recitals and school award nights.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Do April snow showers bring May dead flowers? Weather forecasters say it'll do more than shower snow today. More like two to four inches. But the flowers should come through just fine, said Rick Lewandowski, curator at the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania. A spring snowfall won't create significant problems for people, either, because "most of the snow on the roads will just melt," said Accu-Weather meteorologist Laura Anderson. "On lawns and other non-paved surfaces there could be a couple of inches.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 7, 2016
OVER THE WEEKEND, I read a column on philly.com by Christine Flowers. It was about Bill Cosby and William Lynn. In it, the author wrote that Lynn was charged under a law that does not apply to him. That is not correct. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled, in Lynn's case, that Lynn could be charged with endangering the welfare of a child. Since the author's incorrect statement of the law seems to be the basis for her conclusion that Lynn was convicted of a crime he did not commit, the entire column - as it relates to Lynn - is false.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
After a six-month nationwide search, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has selected a new president from Philadelphia's nonprofit and business communities. Matt Rader - who has held leadership roles with the Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust and the business improvement district that helped revitalize East Passyunk Avenue - will be the 37th president of the nonprofit that runs the world's largest and oldest indoor flower show. Rader, 37, holds a master's degree in business administration from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2016 | By Nancy Brachey, THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER
As the Christmas tree goes away, the poinsettia starts to look old, and the holly branches are fading fast, many of you will be looking for something of a different style and color. Several fine houseplants are prime choices for the indoor winter landscape and a perfect antidote to red-and-green overload. Some even thrive in the cool air of unheated sunrooms or windowsills. In January, garden centers and grocery stores often show a nice range of cineraria and cyclamen plants in full bloom.
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
With perhaps their best blooms behind them, the flowers at Trader Joe's get a second chance when Patricia Gallagher walks through the door. The 64-year-old author and motivational speaker gathers up the day-old bouquets most mornings, and packs them into her white Kia Forte, and sets forth on her daily mission: Random acts of flowering. That's what Gallagher calls the initiative she launched nearly three years ago, handing free flowers to anyone who needs a floral pick-me-up.
NEWS
December 7, 2015 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Once again, it's that time of year when merry gentlemen and ladies go looking for books to give to friends and family. Real books. Beautiful books. Books you put on display, not away. Among the best this year is a comprehensive look at American still-life painting. Another reveals how Dutch painting in its heyday helped distinguish high from low in Dutch society. There's a book about the most-photographed 19th-century American and another about a well-traveled sphinx. There are books on the beauty of dragonflies, flowers, and even New Jersey, and much more.
SPORTS
October 20, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - The New York Giants used their first-round draft pick in June to select an offensive tackle for the second time in three seasons. And for third-year player Justin Pugh, that meant he was moving to a new position. The Council Rock South graduate worked tirelessly this offseason in preparation for the switch from right tackle to left guard in the NFL. It was what was best for the team, Pugh said. His willingness has paid off. Pugh has helped anchor the Giants' offensive line, which is one of the league's best at giving its quarterback time to pass.
SPORTS
October 14, 2015 | By Mark Macyk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Markos Pittaoulis made it sound so simple. "When you play Archbishop Ryan, you try to keep the ball from the other team," the Little Flower girls' soccer coach said Monday after his team defeated Ryan, 1-0, at home. "We kept the ball away from them. " But handing Ryan its first Catholic League loss since 2012 was a little more complicated than a simple game of keep away. Cailey Plath scored two minutes into the second half, after a series of back-and-forth passes with midfielder Casey Ritter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Plant some garlic. Buy bulbs online or from a local nursery. Grocery store garlic will grow, but it's best to go with a variety known to thrive in our area. This year, I'm trying Northern White, tested and recommended by friends. Gently separate the garlic bulb into cloves. Eat any that are small or damaged or that have lost their basal plate (the flat part on the bottom), and plant the rest at least 3 inches apart and 2 to 3 inches deep. Prepare the soil by turning in lots of organic matter, then make a hole with your finger (mine is exactly 2½ inches, so it makes a good measuring device)
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In recent years, Philadelphia Flower Show themes have whisked visitors to far-flung destinations from Ireland to Hawaii and the fictional Arendelle (the kingdom in Frozen , as part of last year's blockbuster "Celebrate the Movies" show, featuring a Disney partnership). But the 2016 show, from March 5 to 13, will draw inspiration from closer to home. As an ornate, national parks-theme cake melted under the afternoon sun on Tuesday - Founders' Day to the National Park Service - officials from the Park Service and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society gathered on Independence Mall to unveil the theme, "Explore America: 100 Years of the National Park Service.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she was growing up in Los Angeles in the 1930s, Yuriko Uyehara learned to drive the family car so that she could take her father, Naotaka, to a neighborhood where Japanese American fishing families lived. There, he collected shoes to take back to his cobbler's shop for repairs. By 1938, she had earned an associate's degree in accounting at Los Angeles City College. That normal life was lost when, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, she, her family, and other West Coast residents of Japanese heritage were imprisoned at the Rohwer Relocation Center near McGehee, Ark. Among her losses, Yuriko Uyehara could not practice the Japanese art of flower arranging, which she had happened upon in college.
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