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NEWS
March 26, 1989
Spring arrived at an old Main Line estate to find enormous changes. The rolling lawns around the mansion are scarred with vast expanses of muddy earth where new homes soon will be built. A magnificent copper beech that adorned the property for generations had been cut down over the winter. The stone wall that once served as the entrance to the graceful old property was bulldozed away months ago, as were the evergreen plantings alongside it. Only a few forgotten rocks remain. Nobody, however, bothered to tell the crocuses.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
Let springtime begin, at least at the Civic Center, where the Philadelphia Flower Show will blossom for eight days beginning today. The theme of this year's show is "Kaleidoscope - The Wonderful World of Color," featuring color displays from the seasons of the year and from different eras. The show will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. today and next Sunday, and from 10 to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by Ellen DiPiazza
When Jack and Emily Aprill first covered 30 acres with plants that hummingbirds love, it was a hobby. For 19 years, however, they have let the public in to see the tiny birds as they pause to spend August amid the swamp hyacinths, salvia, cinnamon ferns and cardinal flowers.
LIVING
January 18, 1987 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
My flower-arranging capabilities have never gone far beyond the stuff-it- all-in-a-vase phase, and nine times out of 10 the flowers would have looked better if I had left them out in the garden or at the florist. Cheryl Monroe of West Chester, on the other hand, can take a dozen flowers, a simple vase, some filler greenery and within minutes create a delightful arrangement. She insists this ability is not inborn; often, she says, people just do not know what flowers to buy, what to put them in or how to take care of them.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Many of Pearl Bailey's VIP friends couldn't be on North Broad Street yesterday to bid a personal farewell to the show business legend. So they said their goodbyes with flowers. Among them were former President Gerald Ford and his wife Betty. "Pearl gave her incredible joy and talent to the world," read a card, addressed to Bailey's family, that accompanied a spray of flowers placed just to the left of the casket. "We will miss her," added the Fords, "but rejoice in having been permitted into her life.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | By B.G. Kelley
'There's power in flowers," my pop the florist forever preached. Flowers were a gift like other natural gifts - a full moon, the mountains, rainbows and sunsets. Flowers, he would remind me, are a steady force, softening even the toughest among us. Even roofers send their hearts in a vase. But most of all, my pop told me, flowers speak to the verities of the heart and soul: Honor, truth, love. God, he was right. One day long ago, as I was working side by side with him in his tiny flower shop in the Paradise section of the city, I was telling him I had taken out a French major at Temple, but there wasn't enough spark to turn on a pocket flashlight.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | By Caroline Meline
Flower lust is a condition in which a person craves the sight of flowers. She can't get enough. She is drawn like a bee into other people's gardens, where she surveys the blooming variety covetously to see what would work in her own yard. She haunts nurseries, where the proprietors quickly realize they are dealing with an addict and get to know her by name. When the gardening season ends, she consults catalogues and plans for spring. If she tries to get at the root of her obsession, it seems to be color itself she desires, not unlike the grandmother Baby Suggs in Toni Morrison's Beloved, who called for pink and pondered the orange square in her quilt.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Annual statice is wonderful for a variety of bouquets and projects because of its wide array of colors. Elise Payne grows bunches of statice in her community garden plot and has developed a small business drying and using it to decorate gift items. You should be able to purchase transplants next month, but Payne, of Strafford, Chester County, prefers to grow her statice from seed, sowing it inside on a windowsill or under light units during the last week of April. Like globe amaranth, annual statice is sensitive to cold, damp soil, so Payne suggests waiting until the first week of June to transplant the seedlings, unless you live in a sheltered location where the soil warms up quickly.
NEWS
September 10, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What we like: The Villanova shop sells bunches of fresh flowers, ideal to surprise a sweetheart, for just $10 every day. The colorful floral selections include carnations, mini-carnations, alstroemeria, limonium and monticasino aster. Flowers on the Avenue is a full-service store that for more than 20 years has offered garden-style arrangements customized for weddings and funerals as well as personalized get-well arrangements, bouquets for proms, and single stems for dance recitals and school award nights.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Do April snow showers bring May dead flowers? Weather forecasters say it'll do more than shower snow today. More like two to four inches. But the flowers should come through just fine, said Rick Lewandowski, curator at the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania. A spring snowfall won't create significant problems for people, either, because "most of the snow on the roads will just melt," said Accu-Weather meteorologist Laura Anderson. "On lawns and other non-paved surfaces there could be a couple of inches.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
WHEN GARY JOHNSON had his Aleppo moment a week ago, I was among those who could not believe his absolute incompetence. I understand that Libertarians generally take an isolationist position when it comes to foreign affairs (now, all the offended Libertarians are going to flood my inbox with insulting comments along the lines of "Aleppo this, you harridan"), but it was incredibly troubling to see someone who thought he was fit to lead this country show such a lack of interest, of inquisitiveness, of recognition that, as John Donne wrote, "No man is an island, entire of itself.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
Hello, dark plaids and plush velvets. Goodbye, peonies and poppies. (Right?) The trendlet Not necessarily. Sheaths and slim trousers, blouses and bags, and pumps and pants feature plenty of petaled motifs on wine, evergreen, navy, and, yes, even black backgrounds this fall. Where do they come from? Floral-print apparel traces its roots to Asia. In the 11th century, Japanese kimonos featured chrysanthemums, and in ancient Chinese culture, flowers were embroidered on robes.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
WHEN YOU HAVE a certain reputation for being, let's just say, unambiguously pro-life, people who don't share your beliefs will be, let's just say, wary about talking to you. And if, in addition to that, you write a regular column about being pro-life, or you host a radio show where you're not shy about your views, or you appear regularly on television and they stick you in the "anti-abortion" chair in the studio, it's no surprise that people who think...
NEWS
September 2, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
A VERY DEAR FRIEND of mine scolded me on Facebook for not letting people know that I'm an immigration lawyer with a "vested interest" in immigration policy, before writing anything on the topic. Actually, short of walking around with an inflatable kiddie pool and carrying a torch while chanting "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free," I think I've been pretty open about what I do from 9-5. But, in the interest of full disclosure and Facebook harmony, here it is again: I have practiced immigration law full time for over 20 years.
NEWS
August 26, 2016
By Christine Flowers THEY TOLD ME not to overreact. Read the comments "in context," they said. And, after all, Christine, you're an immigration lawyer, you have a tendency to blow these things out of proportion. Chill, lady. Go say a rosary, and call us in the morning. That's pretty much the reaction I got when I posted Stephen Bannon's comments on Facebook. In case you don't know what comments I'm referring to, let me help you with a few choice tidbits: This: "I understand why Catholics want as many Hispanics in this country as possible, because the church is dying in this country, right?
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
ON THE WHOLE, I'm an imperfect Catholic, but there is one particular area of my Christian identity in which I excel: guilt. Jews talk a lot about the concept, and have even built some cultural traditions around it, but, to my knowledge, no one else has actually created an entire sacrament devoted to cleansing your culpable soul. Again. And again. And, my mea maxima, again. I can feel guilty about stepping on the cracks in the sidewalk (my mother's back was quite fragile,) guilty about killing the mosquito that is harpooning my upper arm, guilty, even, about the homeless person who looks at the sandwich I've offered and says, "I don't eat meat.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
I'M MORBIDLY fascinated by the rhetorical mud being slung between Democrats and Republicans these days. How exhilarating to hear Hillary Clinton labeled "unstable" by Donald Trump, who is himself called "bat(bleep)-crazy" by a fellow billionaire and Hillaryite, Mark Cuban. Breathtaking to hear the former secretary of state, who presided over the first massacre of a U.S. ambassador in 40 years, say, "It's not hard to imagine Donald Trump leading us into a war just because someone got under his very thin skin," then listen to a fervent Trumpeter named Alex Jones call Clinton and her husband "organized criminals . . . .and there's a lot of death around them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2016
Deadhead! With all the heat and rain, flowers are busting out all over. But remember, most plants flower so they can set seeds and die, or at least retire to Florida. If you want them to keep blooming, you have to prevent the completion of the cycle by removing flowers as soon as they are done. Snip off dead flowers, and the sticking-out stems as well, to make it all tidy. Revisit your beetle plan. Two weeks ago, I talked about low-tech beetle control - i.e., knocking them off their branches into a coffee can of water - and heard back from the Pheromone Trap Delegation.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
IN "LOST in Democrats' Fantasy Land," (July 29) Christine Flowers peddles a dark, stark view of politics that leaves little room for the complexities of real life. Women and people of color know better than most what it's like to have our rights trampled, our safety threatened, and even our lives endangered by politicians and policies that fail to recognize our humanity. We can't afford to live with rose-colored glasses, especially when the Hyde Amendment and other bans on insurance coverage for abortion are used to deny women the care they need and push families into poverty.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
NORMALLY, I'm no fan of the silly-season stuff, and you know exactly what I'm talking about. I'd rather know what a political candidate thinks about the federal debt than whether his wife is a looker. I'd rather have some understanding of what another candidate will do to lower the unemployment rate than whether her husband is still playing around on the side. These are the somewhat boring, yet nonetheless crucial issues that face us in an election year. Still, the silly stuff is amusing, and if you're having a particularly long and stressful day, it's enjoyable to plunge into the sticky, sordid little pool of sound bites and non-news.
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