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Fluoride

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NEWS
September 5, 2001 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Montgomery County farmers who have complained for years that pollution from a nearby chemical plant caused death and disease in their dairy herds have filed suit against the company. Merrill Mest of Schwenksville and Wayne Hallowell of Gilbertsville say excessively high levels of fluoride released by Cabot Performance Materials in Boyertown were absorbed by vegetation on their farms and subsequently entered the systems of their animals, poisoning them. The farmers are suing Cabot despite a report last year from the federal Environmental Protection Agency absolving Cabot of blame, suggesting instead that the problems could have been caused by poor farming practices.
NEWS
October 19, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Fluoridation's biggest opponents squared off against its biggest boosters yesterday in a battle over whether the additive will be required in the drinking water of all 8.5 million New Jerseyans. The state's Public Health Council spent most of the afternoon listening to and asking questions of the experts. The council will likely take a while to sort things out. "It would be much easier for us to punt than to listen," council chairman Robert Pallay said. "This is not a slam dunk on either side.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | By Erin Mooney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fluoridation is an issue that has parted the waters in Lower Makefield - and tomorrow night, the township supervisors will take a stance. What began as a request by a local dentist to treat the township's water has turned into a whirlwind of fact-citing and information-tossing, reminiscent of decades past when the issue was brought to the forefront of American dentistry. Questions about health, dentistry and the responsibility of local government have been raised. Fluoridation is one of the biggest issues to come to Lower Makefield in a long time.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | By Marego Athans, Special to The Inquirer
State and local water officials are trying to determine why Burlington City's drinking water is turning cloudy when fluoride is added to it, said Barker Hamill, chief of the state Bureau of Safe Drinking Water. "It's clearly an aesthetic problem," Hamill said last week. "It's highly unlikely that it's a health-related problem. " Nearly two months ago, Burlington City's superintendent of water, Vincent Calisti, noticed that the city's water supply turned cloudy when he added fluoride, in the same state-regulated dosage he has been adding since 1985.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said yesterday that it erred in a May 4 report about pollution near Gilbertsville, in western Montgomery County. The EPA said a laboratory that analyzed fluoride and nitrate in soil and vegetation samples counted the chemicals in "parts per million instead of parts per billion - making the contaminant levels appear to be higher than they actually are. " In its May 4 report, the agency said "elevated levels" of arsenic, boron, fluoride and uranium were found at the farm of Wayne Hallowell and at a nearby company, Cabot Performance Materials.
NEWS
August 31, 2004 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most people choose bottled spring water for its purity and taste. But that clear plastic container with the cool, bubbly scenes on the front can have a little-known downside inside: no fluoride, the chemical credited with causing a dramatic drop in cavities in the United States over the last half-century, especially among children. Who knew? As sales of nonfluoridated bottled water continue to climb, more dentists are urging parents and patients to seek out the few brands that have added fluoride.
NEWS
May 18, 2007
WHAT IS the most insidious communist plot in the U.S.? Fluoride in the water? . . . No. Reality TV? . . . No. Current Democratic Party? . . . No. Environment-al wackos? . . . No. Answer: It's those plastic containers that supermarkets use for the their baked goods - and that need a chain saw to be opened. If Marie Antoinette had these things, she would never have said, "Let them eat cake!" Tom Bell Philadelphia
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Government standards for drinking-water quality fail to protect the health of half the population, consumer advocate Ralph Nader said yesterday. The Environmental Protection Agency has assumed in its calculations that people consume at most two liters of water - about two quarts - per day, even though "half the U.S. adult population drinks more than two liters of water per capita per day, and the EPA knows this," Nader said in a statement. The EPA's drinking-water standards govern the amounts of contaminants permitted in the water.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A four-member federal team visited two farms in northwestern Montgomery County yesterday as part of a yearlong inquiry into health problems in livestock on a few farms there. "It's a very interesting set of problems," said Stephanie R. Ostrowski, a veterinary epidemiologist who had come from the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in Atlanta. But Ostrowski said she could draw no immediate conclusions. She had been invited by the Philadelphia regional office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which since January has been conducting tests in several locations near Gilbertsville.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A PHILLY WOMAN who called Nestle's customer-service department to inquire about the fluoride content in her Nestle Pure Life water was "threatened with a bloody death" by the customer representative who took her call, according to a lawsuit filed last week in Common Pleas Court. Shimrit Ellis claims that on Aug. 5, 2012, she called Nestle's customer service with concerns about the "possible health ramifications" of the fluoride in the bottled water she purchased. Her call was answered by a woman.
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NEWS
January 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MAN WHO will let a Florida king snake crawl through one sleeve of his robe and out the other is a man to be reckoned with. And then there was the iguana that had free rein of his home in Wayne and later Berwyn. In fact, the king snake had free rein, too, until his wife put her foot down. It is now in a tank. But Joel M. Kauffman was a man to be reckoned with for many other reasons, as well. A prominent chemist, researcher and medical writer, he would receive several hundred emails daily from people who just wanted to pick his brain.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A PHILLY WOMAN who called Nestle's customer-service department to inquire about the fluoride content in her Nestle Pure Life water was "threatened with a bloody death" by the customer representative who took her call, according to a lawsuit filed last week in Common Pleas Court. Shimrit Ellis claims that on Aug. 5, 2012, she called Nestle's customer service with concerns about the "possible health ramifications" of the fluoride in the bottled water she purchased. Her call was answered by a woman.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
Medical Products Laboratories Inc. has been approved for a $472,500 loan with an interest rate of 1.5 percent through the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority to help buy a building near its operations in the Bustleton section of Philadelphia. The privately held company will buy an existing 22,900-square-foot building as part of a $1.03 million project that will create 14 jobs and retain 148 employees, according to a statement by the Corbett administration. Medical Products Laboratories calls itself one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of fluoride mouth rinses used in schools.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Portland approves water fluoridation PORTLAND, Ore. - The city council unanimously approved a plan Wednesday to add fluoride to Portland's water, meaning Oregon's biggest city will no longer be the largest holdout in the nation. The ordinance calls for city water to be fluoridated by March 2014. Dental experts say fluoride is effective in fighting cavities. Opponents of public fluoridation say it is unsafe and violates an individual's right to consent to medication. Opponents also say council members rushed into action without a public vote.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
I Don't Know How She Does It is ostensibly a comedy, a laugh-with-her romp about a crazed working mother who dismisses a pesky case of head lice as "probably just my stress eczema flaring up again. " And yet, I heard sniffling in the theater during the pivotal dramatic scene, as the heroine's speech-delayed son utters his first words, "Bye-bye, Mama. " Why cry? Because he comes to life just as she's fleeing her family for another business trip - on Thanksgiving. In the dark, I am surrounded by six women who can commiserate.
NEWS
August 28, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a University of Pennsylvania dental student in the late '60s, Joseph R. Greenberg noticed a curious difference in the mouths of the low-income children he treated at the school's Philadelphia clinic and those he saw at his externship in Coatesville. "The Philadelphia kids all had perfect teeth, maybe a few cavities," he said. "In Coatesville, there were just giant holes where teeth should have been. " The difference, said Greenberg, who runs a cosmetic dentistry practice in Villanova, was fluoride.
NEWS
December 18, 2009 | By Adrienne Lu INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
An effort by New Jersey lawmakers to require the fluoridation of public drinking water throughout the state has run into a formidable foe: the troubled economy. A bill to mandate fluoride in community drinking water cleared the Senate health committee last week, but the chairwoman of the Assembly Appropriations Committee, Nellie Pou (D., Passaic), does not plan to post the bill for a hearing, which could kill the effort. Tom Hester Jr., a spokesman in the Assembly Majority Office, said Pou was concerned about the "potential cost to the consumer.
NEWS
September 26, 2007 | By Jon J. Johnston
This fall, the Pennsylvania General Assembly has the opportunity to improve the health of millions by requiring public water suppliers to add a naturally occurring substance to our drinking water. The natural substance is fluoride, which for generations has been used safely and effectively to prevent tooth decay among people of all ages and economic backgrounds. More than 50 years of scientific study shows that fluoride reduces tooth decay 20 to 40 percent in the entire population.
NEWS
May 18, 2007
WHAT IS the most insidious communist plot in the U.S.? Fluoride in the water? . . . No. Reality TV? . . . No. Current Democratic Party? . . . No. Environment-al wackos? . . . No. Answer: It's those plastic containers that supermarkets use for the their baked goods - and that need a chain saw to be opened. If Marie Antoinette had these things, she would never have said, "Let them eat cake!" Tom Bell Philadelphia
NEWS
June 7, 2005 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Factions for and against the potential mandatory fluoridation of New Jersey's water supply squared off yesterday in a final attempt to sway the state Public Health Council. Their arguments to the council were much the same as they have been: The additive either offers a huge benefit for children's dental health or is a poison the government has no right to force-feed to the entire population. Council chairman Robert M. Pallay said that, as a physician, he would recommend using fluoride.
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