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FOOD
February 13, 1991 | By Morris and James Carey, Special to the Daily News
Q. What's the best way to install double-glass French doors? We have been told by one person that sealing on the inside is the best way, and another person told us that sealing on the outside is the best way. Which is correct? - H.K. A. They're both good methods, but the best way is to do both. The two-step process is simple. A metal flashing should be installed across the top of the opening at the exterior, and foam or caulk sealant should be used to completely fill the gap between the frame of the door and the frame of the opening in the wall.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Diane Russell, Special to The Inquirer
"I took your gun - now what are you going to do?" the drug dealer said to the undercover narcotics agent. "I'm not scared. I've got a black belt in karate!" the brave officer answered with a swift blow to the chin of the criminal's clam-shaped foam- rubber head. The hand puppets dueled for only a moment before the good guy emerged as the victor and dragged the bad guy off to jail. This was the end of a puppet skit performed last week by four Williamstown youths who earlier glued together the play's puppet characters - made from cloth, foam rubber and paper plates - at a workshop at the Monroe Township Public Library.
FOOD
October 8, 1986 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: A friend of mine has been the recipient of several quarts of steel-cut oats. Please tell us how to use them. - Mrs. L.M.S. Dear Mrs. L.M.S.: Steel-cut oats are sometimes known as Irish oatmeal or Scotch oats. The oat groats (grains) are cut into three or four pieces instead of being rolled flat as are our rolled oats. Steel-cut oats can be prepared as oatmeal just like rolled oats, although they do take longer to cook. Simmer the oats in water for about 20 minutes, or until the oatmeal is the consistency you prefer.
LIVING
August 1, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: We have a flower bed that seems to be infested with some species of bees - either yellow jackets or hornets that have burrowed into the soil. Whenever we attempt to water the flowers or weed, out they come. What can be done? Answer: According to Ohio State University, Eastern yellow jackets build their nests underground, and your flower bed seems to be a perfect spot for some to forage for food. Yellow jackets are beneficial to agriculture and flower gardening because they consume insects that could harm plants.
LIVING
November 24, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I am considering buying a house that has a large wall of mirrors I would like to remove. The mirrors are about 2 feet square and have been in place for 40 years. Any thoughts on how they might be attached and how difficult it would be to remove them? Answer: They're probably glued right to the wall, which means lots of work and damaged plaster or wallboard. I had a similar problem with corkboard glued to plaster, and I never was able to get it all off. But a reader from Wayne passed along a great suggestion: If the mirror tiles are held by adhesive foam-tape squares, frequently these can be softened and removed by heating with a hair dryer or heat gun until pliable.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony T. Calabrese, 62, of South Philadelphia, a self-taught inventor who held seven patents, including one for a cervical collar, died Sunday at the Hospital of Fox Chase Cancer Center. Mr. Calabrese, a former tailor, developed the "Philadelphia collar" in 1971 after he went to work with Charles Greiner & Co. Inc., an orthopedic appliance company formerly in Philadelphia. The company moved to Westville, N.J., in 1978. Before Mr. Calabrese's invention, patients with severe neck injuries used a metal brace that had to be individually fitted, or a collar of soft foam.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Only four of 10 key area business executives think the national economy will grow next year, and they think it will grow slowly. The executives responding to a third-quarter Meridian Bank survey of executives in southeastern Pennsylvania and Delaware also were a little less optimistic about regional growth than they were earlier in the year. "Every road has its bumps, but the current recovery path seems overly littered with potholes," concluded Bernard M. Markstein, the bank's senior economist.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Me and my big mouth. Joe Sixpack writes a few stories about the great beer rip-off at Veterans Stadium, and the next thing I know my e-mail service nearly crashes from the outrage of the nation's ballpark boozers. The folks at Philly Online, the Daily News Web site, have been soliciting questions for Joe Sixpack, which I've dutifully answered (despite cutting into the time I must devote to professional beer-drinking). Some excerpts: Q. What's the beef? It doesn't help that I don't like beer, but what's the problem?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Until now, Tristin Lowe has exhibited his work only in nonprofit venues, something that's apparently popular with a set of youngish Philadelphia artists. (As a friend put it recently, "They just don't want to sell their work. ") But the worst has finally happened: Lowe has his first one-person show in a commercial gallery. Moreover, the gallery in question, Fleisher Ollman, which customarily favors two-person and group shows, has made a statement of its own. It has given over its entire space to Lowe's uncompromising, zany circus of art. The immediate thought upon seeing Lowe's found-material sculptures, prints, and clown-makeup/greasepaint drawings is of the leaps of faith that making such work must require.
NEWS
June 7, 2003 | Daily News wire services
Test supports theory foam insulation cracked shuttle A chunk of foam fired at high speed cracked a pair of space shuttle wing parts yesterday, offering what investigators said was the most powerful evidence yet to support the theory that a piece of the stiff, lightweight insulation doomed Columbia. The test was the latest and most crucial in a series of firing experiments meant to simulate what accident investigators believe happened when foam struck the shuttle's left wing during the Jan. 16 liftoff.
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