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LIVING
November 24, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I am considering buying a house that has a large wall of mirrors I would like to remove. The mirrors are about 2 feet square and have been in place for 40 years. Any thoughts on how they might be attached and how difficult it would be to remove them? Answer: They're probably glued right to the wall, which means lots of work and damaged plaster or wallboard. I had a similar problem with corkboard glued to plaster, and I never was able to get it all off. But a reader from Wayne passed along a great suggestion: If the mirror tiles are held by adhesive foam-tape squares, frequently these can be softened and removed by heating with a hair dryer or heat gun until pliable.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony T. Calabrese, 62, of South Philadelphia, a self-taught inventor who held seven patents, including one for a cervical collar, died Sunday at the Hospital of Fox Chase Cancer Center. Mr. Calabrese, a former tailor, developed the "Philadelphia collar" in 1971 after he went to work with Charles Greiner & Co. Inc., an orthopedic appliance company formerly in Philadelphia. The company moved to Westville, N.J., in 1978. Before Mr. Calabrese's invention, patients with severe neck injuries used a metal brace that had to be individually fitted, or a collar of soft foam.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Only four of 10 key area business executives think the national economy will grow next year, and they think it will grow slowly. The executives responding to a third-quarter Meridian Bank survey of executives in southeastern Pennsylvania and Delaware also were a little less optimistic about regional growth than they were earlier in the year. "Every road has its bumps, but the current recovery path seems overly littered with potholes," concluded Bernard M. Markstein, the bank's senior economist.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Me and my big mouth. Joe Sixpack writes a few stories about the great beer rip-off at Veterans Stadium, and the next thing I know my e-mail service nearly crashes from the outrage of the nation's ballpark boozers. The folks at Philly Online, the Daily News Web site, have been soliciting questions for Joe Sixpack, which I've dutifully answered (despite cutting into the time I must devote to professional beer-drinking). Some excerpts: Q. What's the beef? It doesn't help that I don't like beer, but what's the problem?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Until now, Tristin Lowe has exhibited his work only in nonprofit venues, something that's apparently popular with a set of youngish Philadelphia artists. (As a friend put it recently, "They just don't want to sell their work. ") But the worst has finally happened: Lowe has his first one-person show in a commercial gallery. Moreover, the gallery in question, Fleisher Ollman, which customarily favors two-person and group shows, has made a statement of its own. It has given over its entire space to Lowe's uncompromising, zany circus of art. The immediate thought upon seeing Lowe's found-material sculptures, prints, and clown-makeup/greasepaint drawings is of the leaps of faith that making such work must require.
NEWS
June 7, 2003 | Daily News wire services
Test supports theory foam insulation cracked shuttle A chunk of foam fired at high speed cracked a pair of space shuttle wing parts yesterday, offering what investigators said was the most powerful evidence yet to support the theory that a piece of the stiff, lightweight insulation doomed Columbia. The test was the latest and most crucial in a series of firing experiments meant to simulate what accident investigators believe happened when foam struck the shuttle's left wing during the Jan. 16 liftoff.
LIVING
March 3, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The crackle of a two-way radio broke the relative quiet of the second-floor hallway at the Convention Center. "We need a forklift," the voice demanded. "We're ready to put the head on Mother Nature. " That voice, and the plastic protecting the carpets, simply hinted at the organized chaos that lay beyond the door of the exhibition hall. The 2006 Philadelphia Flower Show was literally building to its opening, then just days away. With 50 exhibits to complete, roughly 600 workers constructing them, and very little time to transform the 10-acre hall into the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's annual harbinger of spring, it was surprising that the place wasn't more frenetic.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was the saddest of times, it was the silliest of times. It was the age of . . . Well, you get the idea. Whenever Micky O'Donoughue and the New Vic Theatre of London invade the Annenberg Center, it's time to indulge the classics with a twist of lunacy. This time, New Vic is presenting their version of "A Tale of Two Cities. " It's an interpretation that author Charles Dickens never considered - mixing the guillotine and giggles. Incredible how Dickens missed such an obvious setting for humor.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Daily News wire services contributed to this report
NON-LETHAL WEAPONS: Now that the Cold War's over, what's the military- industrial complex to do? Try to come up with non-death-dealing instruments to help police keep the national peace, that's what. Some stuff being thought up at, as the Wall Street Journal puts it, our "biggest and spookiest" weapons labs has already been nixed: A gun that covers a suspect in gluey foam. Problem: It stuck to the cops, too. A car-stopping microwave burst. Problem: It could stop innocent cars and pacemakers for blocks around and maybe steam the driver like a baked potato.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Shopping for pillows is not as simple as it used to be. Time was, there were flat pillows and fat pillows. Feather-filled or foam. You'd pay $10 to $20 and go home. Today you're dreaming if you want to get out of the store that fast (or that cheaply). You can get a headache just weighing the options. "Healthier sleep" is the buzz phrase. Do you want a pillow that "responds to body pressure"? That "relates to your temperature"? That offers "continuous air circulation"? (Can you even figure out what that means?
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