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NEWS
May 11, 2007
Dear Mom, I know I drove you crazy when: I doodled off the pages of my coloring book and right up my bedroom walls. I hid from you in the department store clothing racks while you yelled my name. I did aerobatic back-flips off our swing-set while you waved a finger at me from the window. I stayed out in a snowstorm until 3 a.m., singing and dancing with my best friend while you canvassed the neighborhood for us. I . . . well, maybe I shouldn't even mention skydiving!
NEWS
March 1, 2008 | By SOLOMON JONES
I'VE BEEN hiding a horrible secret for the past few months. OK, it's been more than a few months. It's been at least a year. What's the secret, you ask? Well, the truth is . . . we've been living with raggedy furniture. Like millions of families with little boys, we've tried desperately to conceal our shame beneath chenille throws and strategically placed pillows. This past week, it finally came to a head. It all began two-and-a- half years ago, when Little Solomon started walking, and testosterone took over.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Jim Hart's miniature world of locomotives and Pennsylvania countryside began encroaching on his suburban home a few years ago, he knew what to do. "That's why we moved. I wanted a bigger basement for the trains," said Hart, 56, a family doctor with a practice in Drexel Hill. The train aficionado has been building an elaborate land of railroad tracks, towns and mountains on a five-foot-high platform in his new basement since he settled into his Rose Tree home four years ago. Although he devotes every Thursday to his beloved hobby, he said, he is only half-finished with his project.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | By Mac Daniel, Special to The Inquirer
Grace Rosenthal is 3 1/2 years old and is throwing orange foam balls all over the place. Suddenly she stops, races across the room, climbs a slippery slope and jumps. After a few somersaults, several wind sprints and a solitary swing on a bar, she puts on her coat and walks quietly out the door. Her actions aren't the result of one too many bowls of sugary cereal. Grace is exercising at a gym exclusively for children, Kidnastics. Owner-operator Lynn Cantwell says she began Kidnastics not only to let small children exercise, but to let them build their confidence at an age when clicking a television remote control may be considered an aerobic exercise.
NEWS
January 2, 1997 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To a bystander, they look like Mummer wannabes, non-musical lackeys who want so desperately to be in a string band that they would carry a 12-foot, 50-pound cuckoo clock 2.5 miles at a snail's pace in frigid weather just to be a part of the action. Sorry, folks, this isn't high school. These are not wannabes. The truth about the Mummers' finely tuned musical machines is that they are driven by these hangers-on, respectfully known as marshals. They build (and carry) the props and set up the lavish scene changes that turn the familiar renditions of "When the Saints Go Marching In" into Vegas-style spectacles.
NEWS
June 29, 1995 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Joe O'Dowd and Paul Maryniak contributed to this report
To everyone else, he was a cute, happy 6-year-old. To his parents, Lenid Barol was a miracle. His adoption was the fulfillment of a dream for Andrea and Joshua Barol, a couple who couldn't have children and desperately wanted them. They went to Russia in March, nervous and excited when they left and ecstatic when they came back with Lenid. "They were just very happy and looking forward to a wonderful future with him," said Rabbi Ira Stone, who described the couple as "beaming" when they brought Lenid to his synagogue.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
Coroner: Teen in Asiana crash killed by vehicle SAN MATEO, Calif. - As the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 burned, Ye Meng Yuan was lying on the ground just 30 feet away, buried by the firefighting foam rescue workers were spraying to douse the flames. No one knows exactly how the 16-year-old Chinese student got to that spot, but officials say one thing is clear now: She somehow survived the crash. And in the chaotic moments that followed - flames devouring the fuselage, those aboard escaping by emergency slides, flight attendants frantically cutting away seat belts to free passengers - a fire truck ran over Yuan, killing her. The new details - released yesterday by the coroner's office - compounded the tragedy for her family and confirmed the growing suspicions that emergency workers have had since soon after the July 6 crash: One of the three who died did so by rescuers' actions.
NEWS
July 14, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Crater is a man who recycles fishing line. He's got his household trash down to eight pounds. A year . And despite the fact that for two decades he has run what is surely the region's most quixotic and varied recycling enterprise, here's a little secret about the master recycler: He doesn't think it should be happening. "The lesson isn't to recycle more," he says amid his hivelike realm, a two-acre property strewn with the detritus of a consumptive culture.
NEWS
July 6, 1991
DON'T BE DUPED: POLYSTYRENE HASN'T BECOME GOOD I was quite annoyed by the June 18 business page article "Recyclable foam could bounce back. " The article portrays and hopes for a bright business future for polystyrene foam. However, due mostly to errors of omission, the article portrayed polystyrene as environmentally friendly. Clearly it is not. First and foremost, large amounts of toxic, health-threatening chemicals are used and released during the polystyrene production process.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | by Scott Huler, Daily News Staff Writer
Muscian Steve Butcher remembers watching, as a child, an episode of the television show "Medical Center. " Said Butcher: "One of the running things was the doctor kept running into this guy participating in research studies" for pay in the hospital clinic. The TV doctor was concerned, but not Butcher. "The guy seemed real cheerful, and I remember thinking, 'Wow, that seems like a great way to make money.' " A career is born. Now Butcher, who also works in a nightclub, participates in "an average of three studies a year" in Philadelphia as a paid subject for drug tests.
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