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SPORTS
November 28, 2006 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The continuing saga of Peter Forsberg's right skate boot, nicknamed "footpa" by some, appears to have taken a positive turn. Harry Bricker, the Flyers' assistant equipment manager, seems to have found the right foam insert and is sending a sample right boot to the skate's manufacturer, Bauer, to mass-produce it for Forsberg. "We just found some foam and added it to the skate . . . and then we took some things out of the back of the skate boot," Bricker said. "We opened up the back of the skate and added this foam to hold his ankle in there.
LIVING
November 24, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: I am considering buying a house that has a large wall of mirrors I would like to remove. The mirrors are about 2 feet square and have been in place for 40 years. Any thoughts on how they might be attached and how difficult it would be to remove them? Answer: They're probably glued right to the wall, which means lots of work and damaged plaster or wallboard. I had a similar problem with corkboard glued to plaster, and I never was able to get it all off. But a reader from Wayne passed along a great suggestion: If the mirror tiles are held by adhesive foam-tape squares, frequently these can be softened and removed by heating with a hair dryer or heat gun until pliable.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Until now, Tristin Lowe has exhibited his work only in nonprofit venues, something that's apparently popular with a set of youngish Philadelphia artists. (As a friend put it recently, "They just don't want to sell their work. ") But the worst has finally happened: Lowe has his first one-person show in a commercial gallery. Moreover, the gallery in question, Fleisher Ollman, which customarily favors two-person and group shows, has made a statement of its own. It has given over its entire space to Lowe's uncompromising, zany circus of art. The immediate thought upon seeing Lowe's found-material sculptures, prints, and clown-makeup/greasepaint drawings is of the leaps of faith that making such work must require.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Radnor Holdings Corp., a heavily indebted manufacturer of disposable plastic and foam cups, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection yesterday and said it had a buyer lined up for its assets. The price for the Radnor company, which lost $94 million last year on sales of $465.6 million, was not included in the filing, and will likely be disclosed when the asset purchase agreement is filed. The company's bankruptcy petition listed assets of $361.5 million and debt of $325.
NEWS
August 11, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Foam floated in portions of the Wissahickon Creek yesterday, after a high-protein solution was released Wednesday from Merck's West Point facility into the Upper Gwynedd sewage treatment system. Merck & Co. Inc. spokeswoman Connie Wickersham said yesterday that the solution was "not toxic or hazardous in any way, but it does foam easily. " Field staffers from the state Department of Environmental Protection surveyed the stream yesterday and saw no dead fish or other aquatic organisms, said spokesman Dennis Harney.
LIVING
June 9, 2006 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Few things in a home take up more space, get more use, or make a bigger style statement than a sofa. Too often, though, finding the right one can be a frustrating quest, requiring marathon treks through countless furniture showrooms, where the sofas are never quite what you had in mind. If it's got the right arms, it's got the wrong cushions. If the size is correct, the legs aren't. This one is too soft. That one too deep. But what if you could skip the search and conceive the sofa of your dreams?
LIVING
March 3, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The crackle of a two-way radio broke the relative quiet of the second-floor hallway at the Convention Center. "We need a forklift," the voice demanded. "We're ready to put the head on Mother Nature. " That voice, and the plastic protecting the carpets, simply hinted at the organized chaos that lay beyond the door of the exhibition hall. The 2006 Philadelphia Flower Show was literally building to its opening, then just days away. With 50 exhibits to complete, roughly 600 workers constructing them, and very little time to transform the 10-acre hall into the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's annual harbinger of spring, it was surprising that the place wasn't more frenetic.
NEWS
October 1, 2005 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shaun Policarpo watched her husband's corporate team race dragon boats on the Schuylkill two years ago. "This is fantastic," she said. "I'm doing it!" She formed the Wild Things with 25 friends and neighbors last year. One of them, 14-year-old Anna Swanson from across the street in Ardmore, had such a blast that she pestered her mom to start a team for her school this year. So Susan Swanson contacted Episcopal Academy staff, students and parents. Within weeks, she had filled three boats - all of which will be competing, with 125 others, in today's fourth Philadelphia International Dragon Boat Festival.
NEWS
July 8, 2003 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the math problem from hell: How did a piece of foam X big, going Y fast, hit the wing at Z angle and cause the destruction of the space shuttle? James D. Walker, a relative baby in the rocket-science world at age 38, filled in the alphabet. NASA officials say he is one of a few people in the world who could. He figured out how a light piece of foam cracked the shuttle's tiles and wing panel - a scenario that investigators believe led to a fatal chain reaction. Walker's work was put to the test yesterday as researchers fired a 1.67-pound piece of foam insulation at 500 m.p.h.
NEWS
June 7, 2003 | Daily News wire services
Test supports theory foam insulation cracked shuttle A chunk of foam fired at high speed cracked a pair of space shuttle wing parts yesterday, offering what investigators said was the most powerful evidence yet to support the theory that a piece of the stiff, lightweight insulation doomed Columbia. The test was the latest and most crucial in a series of firing experiments meant to simulate what accident investigators believe happened when foam struck the shuttle's left wing during the Jan. 16 liftoff.
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