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Focus Groups

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NEWS
August 8, 1996 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Clinton waits to hear what they have to say about health care before he proposes action. House Speaker Newt Gingrich wants to hear their opinions about the budget. They are not lawmakers or lobbyists or scholars. They do not meet in the U.S. Capitol. Or the White House. They sit in plain rooms behind nondescript storefronts in suburban strip shopping malls across the country. The only observers are people watching from behind two-way mirrors, and clients who pay to read a written summary or watch a videotape.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Robert A. Rankin of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
More than any previous president, President Clinton is employing sophisticated polling to help him sell his message on national issues, an effort that is drawing criticism. Last year, Clinton, through the Democratic National Committee, paid nearly $2 million to his pollster. That's more than the $1.7 million the Republican National Committee says it spent on polls for George Bush during all four years he was in office. So frequent is the polling at the Clinton White House that former President Jimmy Carter's pollster, Patrick Caddell, charged not long ago: "I hear the resonance of what is much more a campaign than a presidency.
NEWS
July 31, 2000 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirty-six voters sat in the room. Thirty-five said they had no interest in watching the Republican National Convention. As the Republicans open their quadrennial event in Philadelphia today, they will seek to engage a skeptical electorate that generally has shown little interest in the 2000 presidential campaign, a comfortable electorate that does not feel threatened by crises at home or abroad, an electorate that is curious about George W....
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
A SEXY young woman wearing a slinky black dress and red patent-leather heels approached Susana Mayer before the first Erotic Literary Salon, in 2008. "Can I really read anything?" the woman asked. She then asked to go first and shared an original piece about her "daddy" - and she didn't mean her biological father. "That really set the pace," said Mayer, the salon's founder. "I couldn't have planned it to be better, because then people thought in their minds, 'I can read anything.' And in fact, somebody did. Someone who lived close by said, 'I'm going home and getting my diary at intermission.' " The Erotic Literary Salon is an open mic for authors and fans of original erotica.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | By Suzanne Sczubelek, Special to The Inquirer
Flexible work arrangements and county-subsidized child and elderly care may become an option for Chester County employees in the next five to 10 years. The County Commissioners on Tuesday ordered a $25,000 study to assess employees' family needs as they relate to work. Winning the contract for the job was Towers, Perrin, Forster & Crosby Inc., a Philadelphia-based human resources and management consulting firm. "I've been pushing for this study for a long time," said Commissioners Chairman Joseph J. Kenna.
NEWS
September 12, 1993
SEPTA's big new look is RailWorks, the two-year, $264 million rebuilding program that ended Labor Day weekend. SEPTA also marked the moment with a smaller new look: more user-friendly rail timetables. The redesign results from gripes the transit authority heard at focus groups. To win back former riders and attract new ones, SEPTA has been assembling focus groups of commuters to talk about where improvements could be made. "People commented that the schedules were too difficult to understand," said Richard DiLullo, manager of marketing for SEPTA.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Following an alarming survey in which more than half the students in some Camden schools said they felt unsafe, the district superintendent announced at the monthly school board advisory meeting Tuesday a series of town hall forums and focus groups on the state of the city's schools. Paymon Rouhanifard said he would hold town hall meetings at Creative Arts Morgan Village Academy on Nov. 12, Bonsall Family School on Nov. 14, Woodrow Wilson High School on Nov. 20, and Molina Elementary School on Nov. 21. All meetings are scheduled for 6 p.m. He will also hold focus groups with students, teachers, parents, and support staff, all part of what he calls his listening tour.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1998 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First Union Corp. is preparing a high-powered marketing campaign to help win the loyalty of 2 million customers it acquired in last month's takeover of CoreStates Financial Corp. The bank's own market research, gathered in focus groups that evaluated First Union recently, raised concerns that CoreStates customers feel suspicious of First Union's honesty, fearful of higher fees, and doubtful that the $19.7 billion takeover will benefit them. Despite their skepticism, customers also told consultants for First Union that they would prefer to avoid the hassle of taking their business elsewhere as long as First Union can show, not merely say, that it is at least as friendly and efficient as its rivals.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2002 | By Claire Furia Smith FOR THE INQUIRER
When the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation wanted to examine the psychology of drivers who tailgate, speed or weave, it turned to focus groups held at Group Dynamics in Focus Inc., of Bala Cynwyd. So did the Philadelphia Orchestra when it wanted to figure out how to spruce up its advertising materials. When the makers of Gerber baby foods wanted to learn which flavors really lit up a baby's face, their consultants watched infants being fed by their mothers in rooms at Group Dynamics.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2002 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pay dirt. Arcadia University, the college formerly known as Beaver, has cribbed a page from corporate America, turning a $1.4 million marketing campaign into quick, steep gains in areas that matter most to higher education: applications, enrollment and fund-raising. The 22-month bid to generate buzz about its new name has yielded striking results, school officials say: Freshman applications up 52 percent. Freshman application deposits up 31 percent. Average SAT scores for the freshman class up 25 points.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
A SEXY young woman wearing a slinky black dress and red patent-leather heels approached Susana Mayer before the first Erotic Literary Salon, in 2008. "Can I really read anything?" the woman asked. She then asked to go first and shared an original piece about her "daddy" - and she didn't mean her biological father. "That really set the pace," said Mayer, the salon's founder. "I couldn't have planned it to be better, because then people thought in their minds, 'I can read anything.' And in fact, somebody did. Someone who lived close by said, 'I'm going home and getting my diary at intermission.' " The Erotic Literary Salon is an open mic for authors and fans of original erotica.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Following an alarming survey in which more than half the students in some Camden schools said they felt unsafe, the district superintendent announced at the monthly school board advisory meeting Tuesday a series of town hall forums and focus groups on the state of the city's schools. Paymon Rouhanifard said he would hold town hall meetings at Creative Arts Morgan Village Academy on Nov. 12, Bonsall Family School on Nov. 14, Woodrow Wilson High School on Nov. 20, and Molina Elementary School on Nov. 21. All meetings are scheduled for 6 p.m. He will also hold focus groups with students, teachers, parents, and support staff, all part of what he calls his listening tour.
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A public briefing on the progress of Delaware County's still-forming local economic development strategy will be held Wednesday by the County Council. Once complete, the strategy will be a 10-year plan to promote job growth, opportunity, and community vitality, according to county spokeswoman Trish Cofiell. The Redevelopment Authority of the Delaware County Commerce Center has been working with the Delta Development Group Inc., a Mechanicsburg, Pa.-based planning firm hired for about $107,000, to conduct the study to form the strategy.
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A public briefing on the progress of Delaware County's still-forming local economic development strategy will be held Wednesday by the County Council. Once complete, the strategy will be a 10-year plan to promote job growth, opportunity and community vitality, according to county spokeswoman Trish Cofiell. The Redevelopment Authority of the Delaware County Commerce Center has been working with the Delta Development Group Inc., a Mechanicsburg-based planning firm hired for about $107,000, to conduct the study to form the strategy.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Department of Commerce's Office of Travel and Tourism forecasts that international trips to the United States will grow 23 percent by 2016. The Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau wants a big chunk of that business, whether through conventions, tourists, or students. But with a stagnant budget of $11 million a year, the agency charged with selling space at the now-much-bigger Convention Center has had to improvise. So it conducted a six-month study with focus groups and partnered with City Hall, local businesses, restaurants, and universities, among others, to package Philadelphia as a modern renaissance city.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
TAMPA - For a focus group of Florida swing voters, heavy with those who supported President Obama in 2008 but are ready to switch, "hope and change" have been replaced by disappointment and disgust. Therein lies Mitt Romney's opportunity. But these voters also made clear in a 2½-hour discussion Sunday that their ire is directed at both parties and at the process itself. None of the 23 participants approved of Congress as an institution - in a word-association exercise, the words putrid and self-serving were blurted out to describe the legislative body.
NEWS
December 12, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
As President Obama struck a tax-cut deal with congressional Republicans last week and fought to save it from the outrage of liberals, a focus group of Philadelphia-area voters delivered a mixed verdict on his presidency at midpoint: They lack a strong emotional connection to Obama, finding him aloof and unclear about where he wants to lead the nation. They wonder what core principles he won't compromise on. Yet they like the president, give him some credit for preventing an economic depression, and want him to succeed.
NEWS
June 22, 2010 | By HESHIMU JARAMOGI
PHILADELPHIA City Council recently held hearings on the issue of infant mortality. Many experts testified. A lot of important information was shared - much of which we've heard over the last 20 years. Let's review some of that data. There is a disparity in the rates of infant mortality affecting African-Americans and others in the city and state. West, Southwest and upper North Philadelphia have the highest rates of infant mortality, according to Melita Jordan, director of the state health department's bureau of family health.
NEWS
June 16, 2010
By Bill McDermott A skilled workforce is the lifeblood of any successful company, industry, or economy. Unfortunately, many young people in Philadelphia and across the country are falling short of their global counterparts. In a recent ranking of 31 developed countries, American students finished 15th in reading, 19th in math, and 14th in science. Other statistics suggest we may be headed for trouble. International patent filings from the United States declined by 11 percent last year, while China's increased by nearly 30 percent.
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