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Foie Gras

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NEWS
October 1, 2007
I DON'T hear Robert Reilly of Salt & Pepper in Queen Village claiming that people shouldn't spend time watching football, going to the movies or doing other frivolities because there are serious problems in the world, yet he says people shouldn't worry about foie gras production because there are casualties in the war in Iraq ("A bargain for lovers of foie gras," Sept. 26). What a shameful excuse. Matthew Mongiello, Philadelphia
NEWS
June 22, 2007
IDISAGREE with columnist Stu Bykofsky on his stance to ban foie gras. It's no different from the smoking ban, or worse, a capitulation to the PETA wackos. It's not government's place to legislate how we eat. Who are you to judge that foie gras is "unnecessary, unhealthy, unkind"? We aren't talking about killing cute pets. The animals used to make foie gras are unintelligent birds and they are born to be slaughtered. I don't see any difference between raising ducks for foie gras or calves for veal.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Erika Gebel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Protests aside, there may be another reason to pass on the foie gras. Scientists report that these livers of overstuffed waterfowl contain abnormal proteins that, when fed to laboratory mice, caused them to quickly develop the protein clumps themselves. Various human diseases - among them Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and rheumatoid arthritis - are associated with these clumps, known as amyloids. The new paper, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides no direct evidence that people are in danger.
NEWS
September 26, 2007 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of restaurateurs, weary at months of protests against the liver dish known as foie gras and angered at a pending bill to ban its sale in the city, plans to go on the offensive. Nearly 20 restaurants, backed by the nation's largest foie-gras producers and one of the largest wholesalers, will offer "Freedom Foie for Five" - lunch and dinner portions priced at $5 - to expose more people to the dish, regularly served in fewer than a dozen restaurants. The seven-day promotion starts Monday.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Erika Gebel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Protests aside, there may be another reason to pass on the foie gras. Scientists report that these livers of overstuffed waterfowl contain abnormal proteins that, when fed to laboratory mice, caused them to quickly develop the protein clumps themselves. Various human diseases - among them Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and rheumatoid arthritis - are associated with these clumps, known as amyloids. The new paper, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides no direct evidence that people are in danger.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Fenit Nirappil, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - California's new ban on the production and sale of foie gras took eight years to go into effect, but restaurants have wasted little time in finding creative ways to duck the law. The delicacy sparked the ire of animal rights' activists because it is made from the engorged livers of ducks or geese that are force fed through funnel-like tubes. It became illegal in the state this month to make or sell food derived from force-fed birds. Restaurateurs and chefs, however, are using loopholes and clever wordplay to keep the dish on the market, a sign that passions run high on both sides of the issue.
NEWS
June 25, 2007
Activist Nick Cooney and his supporters show how shallow the veneer of modern "culture" is, in particular how lacking in sophistication and grace many of the upscale eateries and their patrons really are ("All's not ducky on foie-gras front lines," June 7). Cooney criticizes the cruel treatment of geese, but in doing so he also holds up a mirror to our entire way of life. So much of what we think of as "normal" is barbaric at its core: breeding animals to kill them, disciplining children by hitting them, stockpiling guns in our homes, waging wars.
NEWS
June 20, 2007
The June 13 commentary, "Examine the facts in debate over foie gras," from the industry's public relations group, Artisan Farmers Alliance, could hardly have been more misleading. If Nicolas Maduros, its executive director, truly wanted to "examine the facts," he would acknowledge that the Scientific Committee on Animal Health and Animal Welfare, an independent council providing expert scientific analysis to the European Commission, found that the liver condition of force-fed birds is pathologic and force-feeding is "detrimental to the welfare of the birds.
NEWS
May 17, 2006 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gourmets have long argued among themselves whether foie gras is best seared, sauteed, or served in a terrine. Now that debate is about to move from the kitchen to the corridors of Philadelphia's City Council, where Councilman Jack Kelly has a new suggestion for how to serve the goose-liver delicacy: not at all. Kelly plans a bill that would ban the sale of foie gras, which he says involves unspeakable cruelty to geese and ducks. "It's torture," Kelly said of the technique of force-feeding birds until their livers are many times the ordinary size.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013
YOU CAN spend years toiling in obscurity, hoping for a shot at the big time. Then, one day, someone taps your shoulder, and suddenly it's time to show the world what you're made of. That happened to Elijah Milligan earlier this month when he was named executive chef at Stateside, on East Passyunk Avenue. Just 24, he joins an exclusive club of executive chefs at standout restaurants in our city's lauded food scene. Milligan replaced hotshot George Sabatino, who had guided the now 2-year-old Stateside from obscure neighborhood spot to best restaurant in the city, according to Philadelphia magazine.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
For the last several summers, Bridget Gray's job could be described as culinary curator. As part of the staff behind the food-focused fund-raiser known as Feastival, she is charged with overseeing the menu items that nearly 90 restaurants and bars will serve Wednesday. She has to keep the selections diverse, to satisfy the 700 or so patrons who are paying upward of $250 a head for the night of entertainment and cocktail-party-style nibbling at Pier 9 on the Delaware River. This third Feastival - whose participants are wrangled by restaurateurs Stephen Starr, Michael Solomonov, and Audrey Claire Taichman - is expected to raise $400,000 for the Live Arts Festival and Philly Fringe.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Fenit Nirappil, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - California's new ban on the production and sale of foie gras took eight years to go into effect, but restaurants have wasted little time in finding creative ways to duck the law. The delicacy sparked the ire of animal rights' activists because it is made from the engorged livers of ducks or geese that are force fed through funnel-like tubes. It became illegal in the state this month to make or sell food derived from force-fed birds. Restaurateurs and chefs, however, are using loopholes and clever wordplay to keep the dish on the market, a sign that passions run high on both sides of the issue.
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | By Kim Geiger, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Taking aim at California's pioneering efforts to bolster animal safety, the House Agriculture Committee has moved to block states from imposing their own standards for agriculture products on producers from other states. That could jeopardize California laws to protect chickens as well as one to ban foie gras, which took effect this month. The panel's amendment to the farm bill was a response to a California law, which will take effect in 2015, that requires that all eggs sold in the state be produced by hens held in cages big enough to allow the chickens to stand and spread their wings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | Jason Wilson
DOES ANY foodstuff carry as much baggage for Americans as escargot or foie gras? When it comes to escargot, it can be hard to move beyond the old pop-cultural image of snail as "snob food. " Plus, for many newbies, there's a primal, knee-jerk repulsion to the animal itself or to the presentation that, when done badly, can look like boogers. And when it come to foie gras — the third rail of the food world — it's difficult to steer any discussion of fatty duck or goose liver away from the ethical or political and back toward the culinary.
FOOD
October 7, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Montreal, it's often said, is as close to Paris as North America gets. And there's no denying that first impression: I could feel a frisson of old France slide into my mind as we rumbled along cobbled Rue St. Paul past charcuteries and cafes up to our charming hotel in Vieux Montreal. But from the opening bites of our first meal at Joe Beef - broiled razor clams Casino and sublime raw Stanley Bridge oysters with bracing Prince Edward Island brine - it was clear that chefs in this Francophone city had eagerly embraced the touchstone flavors of their Canadian DNA. But that go-local impulse, thriving in Philadelphia and along the East Coast, hits a lusty high gear in Montreal, where the meat-centric kitchens cook for winter all year long, and even warm-weather meals come laced with rich poutine gravy and foie gras.
FOOD
March 11, 2010 | By Jodie Chase, Contra Costa (Calif.) Times
In patisseries across France, delicate sandwich cookies in every color of the rainbow take their place beside elegant eclairs, tarts and other works of pastry art. French macarons - not to be confused with chewy coconut macaroons - are tiny dome-shaped pastry shells filled with ganache, buttercream or fruit mixtures. They're gently crunchy on the outside, light as air and chewy inside. But these days, there's no need to hop a plane to enjoy them. You can find the dainty treats in various pastry shops and in the freezer case at Trader Joe's.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
A curious gust of chestnut soups has settled in this season, without apparent rhyme or, well, who needs a reason, overstaying the normal autumn run. No shared motive emerges. And sometimes stuff just happens - like the sudden uptick in local, house-made hot dogs and the remakes of, yes, scrapple (with crab, with just vegetables, and with foie gras, or partly foie gras.) At Meme, the corner spot at 22d and Spruce Streets, chef David Katz made a batch of his abidingly simple puree (just chestnuts, onion, chicken stock, and a dab of crème fraîche)
FOOD
May 14, 2009 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Le Bec-Fin alum Pierre Calmels and his wife, Charlotte, are about a week into Bibou (1009 S. Eighth St., 215-965-8290), their homey, cash-only BYOB in the tiny corner storefront near the Italian Market that previously was Pif. The French-born and -trained Calmels' first U.S. job was in the 1990s at Daniel in New York. He relocated to Switzerland, where he met Charlotte working at the same hotel. In August 2001, he got a job in the United States and asked her to follow him. She's worked at Brasserie Perrier, the Restaurant School as an instructor, gourmet grocer Assouline & Ting, Patou, and Bistro St. Tropez.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Only a comma separates local from seasonal, at least in most applications, which tend to involve this time of year the signage on soggy farm stands and above sparse market bins and the fine print on the back of menus, suffixed with the legalistic disclaimer "when possible. " But early April - especially a rainy, raw one like we endured last week - can make the distance seem less a pause than a stand-off: Seasonal is one thing. Local is another matter. So you find yourself at Cafe Estelle, devouring a plate of grilled scallions with a roasted red-pepper and ground-almond romesco sauce in the venerable rite-of-spring Spanish tradition.
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