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Folic Acid

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NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Preventing certain devastating birth defects has become as easy as pie crust - and bread, cereal, pasta, and other grain products. Seventeen years after the government required the addition of folic acid to enriched cereal grains, fortification spares 1,300 babies a year from being born with brains or spinal cords that are not fully formed, a new analysis by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows. Averting those "neural tube" defects saves $508 million annually - not to mention untold heartache.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women who take the vitamin folic acid from the very start of pregnancy can dramatically reduce their chances of having a baby with a serious birth defect. That finding - emerging from scientific studies - is prompting federal health officials to consider whether all women should be advised to start taking this common vitamin as soon as they begin to try to get pregnant. A major international study published in July found that when women took folic acid before conception and on into the first three months of pregnancy, their risk of having a baby with spina bifida or other nervous-system defect was cut by 72 percent.
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Women could substantially cut their risk of heart disease by consuming about twice as much folic acid and Vitamin B6 as is currently recommended, a new study suggests. Harvard University researchers tracked 80,000 healthy nurses for 14 years and found that those who consumed at least 400 micrograms of folic acid and 3 milligrams of Vitamin B6 each day from food or vitamin supplements cut their risk of heart disease in half compared with women with the lowest intakes. The current Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)
NEWS
February 9, 2004 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sonia Figueroa was asking the women gathered for a health workshop what they knew about acido folico. "When you were pregnant or planning to be pregnant, did the doctor talk to you about folic acid?" she asked them in Spanish. The nine women, all of them mothers and natives of Puerto Rico, were familiar with the vitamin called folic acid, and most had taken vitamins after becoming pregnant, but Figueroa told them they needed to do something more. "It's important to take folic acid even if you're not planning to have a child, because you're of childbearing age," she said.
LIVING
August 2, 1999 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Homocysteine. Someday it may trip as easily off your tongue as "cholesterol. " This amino acid, which is present in everyone's blood, is the subject of a huge amount of research these days as scientists try to figure out just what it does in the body. High homocysteine levels have been associated with heart disease, stroke and, more recently, Alzheimer's disease. But researchers still don't know whether homocysteine causes those problems or whether you'll be less likely to get sick if high homocysteine levels are lowered.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Folic acid and autism risk Mothers who took folic acid supplements around the time they became pregnant were less likely to have children with an autism spectrum disorder, a new study found. Researchers in Norway examined records of more than 85,000 children born there between 1999 and 2009 to check for an autism diagnosis. They also looked at surveys of their mothers to see how much folic acid they were consuming in the month before they became pregnant and during the first eight weeks of pregnancy, a critical period of brain development.
FOOD
August 28, 1994 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's time to hit the roadside stands for the finest produce you'll eat all year long. Local fruits and vegetables spill from bins, just begging to be taken home. With everything at the peak of flavor and freshness, you'll want to choose the best of the best. And with items this tempting, it's easy to slip into the good nutrition mode. If you've been trying to take the focus off meat, look for fresh lima beans. Pair them with an ear of sweet white corn for protein that's every bit complete.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
CHOLERA'S COMING Don't look now, but a cholera epidemic that has killed more than 2,500 South Americans is moving north toward the U.S. border. That warning comes from a Pan American Health Organization meeting. More than 250,000 cases of cholera have been reported in seven Western Hemisphere countries this summer, the federal Centers for Disease Control reports. Fourteen cases, mostly linked to travel or to food illegally imported from the cholera zone, have been reported in the United States.
FOOD
January 29, 1995 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're looking for a hearty but low-fat lunch, try lentils. They're a modern miracle health food as old as the hills. Probably the first cultivated legumes, lentils have been grown for food since 7000 B.C., according to food historians. Lentils are the most digestible of all the legumes, and the easiest to prepare. Unlike most beans, lentils don't have to be soaked, and can be cooked, from scratch, in just 15 to 20 minutes. Health benefits abound. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides 232 calories, 18 grams of protein, 40 grams of carbohydrate, and only a trace of fat and sodium.
LIVING
October 21, 1996 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kim Andreacola was devastated last March when her daughter Rachel was born with a collection of birth defects - a cleft palate, malformed tongue and gums, an underdeveloped chin, and an extra digit on her right thumb and right big toe. Six days after birth, Rachel was diagnosed with a rare disorder called oral-facial-digital-syndrome, type I. For Andreacola and her husband, John Baranowski, the shock of having a child with deformities soon...
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NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Preventing certain devastating birth defects has become as easy as pie crust - and bread, cereal, pasta, and other grain products. Seventeen years after the government required the addition of folic acid to enriched cereal grains, fortification spares 1,300 babies a year from being born with brains or spinal cords that are not fully formed, a new analysis by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows. Averting those "neural tube" defects saves $508 million annually - not to mention untold heartache.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Folic acid and autism risk Mothers who took folic acid supplements around the time they became pregnant were less likely to have children with an autism spectrum disorder, a new study found. Researchers in Norway examined records of more than 85,000 children born there between 1999 and 2009 to check for an autism diagnosis. They also looked at surveys of their mothers to see how much folic acid they were consuming in the month before they became pregnant and during the first eight weeks of pregnancy, a critical period of brain development.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
As the darkest days of the year close in, some of us crave the feel of sunlight on our skin. That could reflect our evolutionary heritage, since we humans are not well-adapted to live as far north as Philadelphia. We're essentially an equatorial, tropical species who migrated only recently to places with long, dark winters. There hasn't been time to adapt. One major problem with living this far from the equator is that it's hard to get enough Vitamin D, a hormone that turns out to be essential not only for keeping our bones strong but also for running our immune systems and just about everything else.
NEWS
February 9, 2004 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sonia Figueroa was asking the women gathered for a health workshop what they knew about acido folico. "When you were pregnant or planning to be pregnant, did the doctor talk to you about folic acid?" she asked them in Spanish. The nine women, all of them mothers and natives of Puerto Rico, were familiar with the vitamin called folic acid, and most had taken vitamins after becoming pregnant, but Figueroa told them they needed to do something more. "It's important to take folic acid even if you're not planning to have a child, because you're of childbearing age," she said.
LIVING
August 2, 1999 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Homocysteine. Someday it may trip as easily off your tongue as "cholesterol. " This amino acid, which is present in everyone's blood, is the subject of a huge amount of research these days as scientists try to figure out just what it does in the body. High homocysteine levels have been associated with heart disease, stroke and, more recently, Alzheimer's disease. But researchers still don't know whether homocysteine causes those problems or whether you'll be less likely to get sick if high homocysteine levels are lowered.
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Women could substantially cut their risk of heart disease by consuming about twice as much folic acid and Vitamin B6 as is currently recommended, a new study suggests. Harvard University researchers tracked 80,000 healthy nurses for 14 years and found that those who consumed at least 400 micrograms of folic acid and 3 milligrams of Vitamin B6 each day from food or vitamin supplements cut their risk of heart disease in half compared with women with the lowest intakes. The current Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)
LIVING
October 21, 1996 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kim Andreacola was devastated last March when her daughter Rachel was born with a collection of birth defects - a cleft palate, malformed tongue and gums, an underdeveloped chin, and an extra digit on her right thumb and right big toe. Six days after birth, Rachel was diagnosed with a rare disorder called oral-facial-digital-syndrome, type I. For Andreacola and her husband, John Baranowski, the shock of having a child with deformities soon...
FOOD
January 29, 1995 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're looking for a hearty but low-fat lunch, try lentils. They're a modern miracle health food as old as the hills. Probably the first cultivated legumes, lentils have been grown for food since 7000 B.C., according to food historians. Lentils are the most digestible of all the legumes, and the easiest to prepare. Unlike most beans, lentils don't have to be soaked, and can be cooked, from scratch, in just 15 to 20 minutes. Health benefits abound. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides 232 calories, 18 grams of protein, 40 grams of carbohydrate, and only a trace of fat and sodium.
FOOD
August 28, 1994 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's time to hit the roadside stands for the finest produce you'll eat all year long. Local fruits and vegetables spill from bins, just begging to be taken home. With everything at the peak of flavor and freshness, you'll want to choose the best of the best. And with items this tempting, it's easy to slip into the good nutrition mode. If you've been trying to take the focus off meat, look for fresh lima beans. Pair them with an ear of sweet white corn for protein that's every bit complete.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women who take the vitamin folic acid from the very start of pregnancy can dramatically reduce their chances of having a baby with a serious birth defect. That finding - emerging from scientific studies - is prompting federal health officials to consider whether all women should be advised to start taking this common vitamin as soon as they begin to try to get pregnant. A major international study published in July found that when women took folic acid before conception and on into the first three months of pregnancy, their risk of having a baby with spina bifida or other nervous-system defect was cut by 72 percent.
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