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Folk Dance

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NEWS
July 3, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by Sharon J. Wohlmuth
The best-trained folk dancers in Russia arrived in Philadelphia yesterday on a friendship tour. The Dancing Teens of Voronezh will appear at the zoo and in the parade tomorrow and at Penn's Landing Sunday. They are students at the Voronezh Dance Academy, which supplies dancers for the most prestigious folk- dance troupes in Russia.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
She is head of the Professional Dance Academy of Montgomery County. He is director of the internationally known Janosik Polish Dance Ensemble. She is the founding director of Monique Legare International Dance Company. He is an authority on the subject of international folk dance, which he has taught for 25 years. Together, Monique Legare and Morley Leyton have built their lives around dance. The couple, who have been married 11 years, recently returned from a tour of Poland, where they were overwhelmed by the hospitality and kindness of their hosts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1987 | By Robert Weiss, Special to The Inquirer
Pardon the cliche, but I was born with a pair of left feet. But, hey, folk dancing couldn't be that difficult, I figured. This was, after all, the dance of the simple folk. My first reaction to the Beaver College International Folk Dance group was intimidation. The music and the way the people were moving to it was foreign. "Come on. You have to try it," said Carol Wadlinger, who was six months pregnant and dancing. Her theatrics didn't sway me. I said: "No. " One week later, I gathered the courage to try my first folk dance.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / APRIL SAUL
Waiting in the wings to perform a folk dance are (from left) Reshma Mirchandani, 12; her sister, Dipti, 8; Priya Panda, 12, and Ritu Pancholi, 12. The girls, all from Voorhees, were part of India Day yesterday at Drexel University, sponsored by the Council of Indian Organizations. India's ambassador, Siddhartha Ray, and Consul General Gajanan Wakankar were among guests at the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, which is at the City Center through Jan. 3, threw a jolly fund-raising event for itself on Tuesday by honoring some of its most charismatic dancers. Five women received bouquets and the applause of their colleagues, who had all gathered on stage to cheer them on. But more to the point of dance-company business, four of Ailey's senior dancers were honored in the premiere of Donald Byrd's A Folk Dance. If you don't happen to know that Marilyn Banks, Sarita Allen, Dudley Williams and Gary DeLoatch are stars of the Ailey group, the costumes they wore in A Folk Dance clue you in. Gabriel Berry has dressed them in different shades of red, all of them flaming.
NEWS
September 15, 2003 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Koresh Dance Company stepped into its 11th season Saturday at the Mandell Theater with a world premiere by Ronen Koresh, "Twisted Pleasures. " In a major departure for the company founder, he put aside much of his jazz-based idiom and moved easily into folk dance. Koresh, with his Israeli background, has used both folk and biblical motifs before, but never with such wit and faithfulness to a primal era. Music identified only as being by Hovaness (not to be confused with the late composer Alan Hovhaness)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1998 | By Nancy G. Heller, FOR THE INQUIRER
Entertaining, accomplished, attractive and ecstatically received - the Virsky Ukrainian National Dance Company was all this on Tuesday night, in the first of two performances at the Merriam Theatre. The company of 90 dancers and musicians, named after its founder, the late Pavlo Virsky, wound up its North American tour by presenting one of the most spectacular stage shows seen in this country since impresario Sol Hurok introduced the Moiseyev Dancers in 1958. For 60 years, Virsky has been keeping traditional Ukrainian dances alive, and one of its traditions is that the men get to do all the interesting steps.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
For years, Pennsylvania politicians have tap-danced their way around tough issues, but soon they may be doing the do-si-do instead. Bucking his polka-loving heritage, Rep. Allen G. Kukovich (D., Westmoreland) has introduced a measure designating the square dance as the official folk dance of Pennsylvania. The bill, which lists Rep. Mark B. Cohen (D., Phila.) as its sole co- sponsor, reports that square-dancing traces many of its elements from New England, Kentucky, Mexico and Europe.
NEWS
June 5, 2000 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the land of the Bristol Stomp, the Mummers Strut and the Twist, the Pennsylvania legislature is on the verge of designating two official state dances: the polka and the square dance. What would Chubby Checker think? (He's on board.) As early as tomorrow, the state House could approve bills naming square dance the "official American folk dance," and polka the "official dance," of Pennsylvania. Twist and shout, baby. It's taken years to get this far. To Square Dance People and Polka People, this is not frivolous.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
The Krasnayarsk Siberian Dance Company, which performed Sunday afternoon at the Academy of Music, is not the most bravura-minded of the folk dance troupes to come out of the former Soviet Union, but it has other qualities that make it unique. One of those qualities was apparent in the opening dance of welcome, when the women bid hello to the audience with the slightest of nods and even slighter flick of their handkerchiefs. The moment made an indelible impression not only because of the elegant restraint of the women's gestures - which the program note characterizes the "reserve of the Siberian character" - but because it goes to the opposite extreme of the way most folk dance programs begin: with flamboyant jumps and other kinds of gunfire.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Ellen Dunkel, For The Inquirer
In May, Lar Lubovitch was awarded the prize for best choreography at the 20th annual Benois de la Danse, one of the most prestigious honors in the dance world. Lubovitch was the first American choreographer ever to win the prize, presented at the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow. So it was extra-special that Lar Lubovitch Dance Company performed the piece that earned him that honor, Crisis Variations, when the popular Dance Celebration series opened its 30th season Thursday night at the Annenberg Center.
NEWS
February 22, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Pew Center for Arts and Heritage has awarded $929,000 to help fund nine dance projects in the region, including a grant of $150,000 to the Voloshky Ukrainian Dance Ensemble for an original work by Brooklyn choreographer Mark Morris. The Pew grants, made through Dance Advance, were announced Monday. Bill Bissell, Dance Advance director, extolled the variety of projects and the openness to new ideas they represent. The Voloshky Ukrainian Dance Ensemble's decision to mark its 40th anniversary next year with an original piece commissioned from Morris represents a significant effort to expand the Voloshky repertoire, according to company artistic director Taras Lewyckyj.
NEWS
March 1, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
WHAT IS Bhangra? It's a folk-music genre and dance that originated in the Punjab region of India, the type of dance that a Temple dance team was en route to perform in North Carolina when its van crashed, claiming the life of Kammini Rajoopath. Bhangra was created by Sikh and Muslim farmers from that region - located in northwestern India and northeastern Pakistan - to celebrate the coming of a Sikh festival. Sikhism is the fifth-largest religion in the world. Over the years, the dance form has grown in popularity, making its way into British pop culture, film soundtracks, college competitions and talent shows.
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
More than a dozen years ago, before anyone ballroom-danced with the stars, Riverdance was telling people that dancing could be cool. And Riverdance went mainstream with an unlikely dance form, too - Irish step dancing, which previously had been performed mostly competitively or as a folk dance. Spun off from a seven-minute intermission routine choreographed for the 1994 Eurovision Song Contest, Riverdance opened in 1995 in Dublin. Soon more step- and tap-dancing tours followed - Lord of the Dance, Feet of Flames, Tap Dogs, Stomp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2008 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
A Frida Family Party will introduce children to the Mexican painter Frida Kahlo at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Sunday. The party - with giant puppets, costumed folk dancers and chances for youngsters to make their own art - coincides with the museum's Frida Kahlo exhibit, which opened Wednesday and continues until May 18. The exhibit, celebrating the 100th anniversary of Kahlo's birth in 1907, showcases more than 40 of her still-lifes and...
NEWS
May 31, 2007 | By Nancy G. Heller FOR THE INQUIRER
Can you feel Broad Street vibrating? DanceBoom!, the Wilma Theater's annual celebration of the city's rich and diverse contemporary dance scene, opens tonight. "This is a delicious time for a dance lover to be in Philadelphia," says Lois Welk, artistic adviser to DanceBoom! curator Terry Fox - and it's hard to argue with that. Running through June 7, this sixth edition of the popular festival features a dozen very different companies: seven performing on the Wilma's main stage and five presenting free "streetside" shows - literally on Broad Street, right outside the theater.
NEWS
March 22, 2007 | By Nancy G. Heller FOR THE INQUIRER
You expect certain things from an Eastern European folk-dance troupe: men sporting luxuriant mustaches, women in full skirts with oceans of petticoats, virtuoso violinists playing faster than seems humanly possible. The Hungarian State Folk Ensemble, which appeared at Irvine Auditorium Tuesday night as part of Penn Presents' International Dance Series, had all that and more. Its two dozen dancers and nine multitalented musicians put on a high-powered, visually and aurally stunning program that surveyed a host of regional traditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2003 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
This holiday season, treat your family, friends and self to the gift of dance. Philadelphia has more than 30 dynamic dance companies - and some of the nation's oldest companies are based here and tour globally. The Pennsylvania Ballet is celebrating its 40th year, while Group Motion Dance Company and Philadanco are gearing up for their 35th anniversaries next year. Each has gone through many changes in personnel but is artistically stronger than ever. Newer companies - from hip-hop to dance theater - thrive here as well.
NEWS
September 15, 2003 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Koresh Dance Company stepped into its 11th season Saturday at the Mandell Theater with a world premiere by Ronen Koresh, "Twisted Pleasures. " In a major departure for the company founder, he put aside much of his jazz-based idiom and moved easily into folk dance. Koresh, with his Israeli background, has used both folk and biblical motifs before, but never with such wit and faithfulness to a primal era. Music identified only as being by Hovaness (not to be confused with the late composer Alan Hovhaness)
NEWS
July 18, 2003 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Lucky for Chinese pianist Yundi Li that his stage charm goes a long way. Warm, smiling, reed-thin, and thrilled to be at the piano, the 20-year-old winner of the 2000 Chopin Competition made his U.S. concerto debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra Wednesday at the Mann Center in what developed into a twofold drama: that which is encompassed by Chopin's moody, lyrical Piano Concerto No. 1, and the suspense of whether and how Li would master it....
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