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Folk Festival

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Folk Festival, the area's biggest party in the park for folk-music aficionados, returns to Old Pool Farm near Schwenksville next Friday to Aug. 25 for its 30th-birthday celebration. On tap during the three-day event will be performances by festival regulars Mike Cross, Roger Sprung, David Bromberg, Steve Forbert, Tom Paxton, Tom Rush, Richie Havens, Stephen Wade and his Band of Soloists and many others, plus, appearing for the first time together, Pete, Mike, Penny and Peggy Seeger.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1997 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Folk Festival, a 36-year tradition that draws thousands of folk-music-lovers each August to the Old Pool Farm near Schwenksville, will be held, as usual, the weekend before Labor Day. The three-day fete includes five major concerts, two days of workshops, a full day of folk and square dancing, a ceilidh (Celtic music mini-festival), a new-talent showcase and all sorts of craft activities for kids. The musical headliners this year are Emmylou Harris, Keb' Mo', Kate and Anna McGarrigle, Trout Fishing in America, and Rosanne Cash.
NEWS
August 18, 2006 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Folk Festival, celebrating its 45th year this weekend, has not been singing a happy song for a while. The festival has been suffering declining attendance and losing money for at least four years. After crowds flocked to celebrate its 40th anniversary in 2001, festival chairman David Baskin said, "things took a turn down and haven't quite fully recovered. " On total revenue of $1,070,376 in the fiscal year ending June 30, 2005 - the most recent year for which data is publicly available - the Philadelphia Folk Song Society reported a deficit of $158,892 to the Internal Revenue Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The 17th annual Korean Folk Festival for Children returns on Saturday at John Russell Field in LaMott, Cheltenham Township. From 1 to 5 p.m. enjoy culture and traditional games. Children can do rice-cake smashing, practice yoga, make masks, and have their faces painted. They can test their strength in a tug-of-war competition and play on a Korean seesaw. There will be performances and cuisine such as stir-fried rice cakes, barbecue beef, and seaweed rolls. 17th annual Korean Folk Festival for Children, 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday at John Russell Field, Penrose and Willow Avenues in the LaMott section of Cheltenham Twp. Rain date is Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1994 | By Penny Jeannechild, FOR THE INQUIRER
Green tree-tips and a riot of tulips give good cause for a sigh of relief. The winter from Hades has past. Welcome above ground, Persephone. As if flora and fauna weren't enough, fairs and festivals are proliferating as well. There are lots, each with something unusual enough to pique a child's interest. Yours, too. So, out and about you go, before the heat and humidity set in. FOLK FETE. Henry Mercer could see it coming. Others tossed out their outmoded kitchenware, their antiquated farm implements.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1998 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
The thing that Jack Williams likes about playing to 20,000 people in a hayfield is the closeness of it all. "The festival provides more intimacy for a greater number of people than any venue I know of," he says. "I think the people are focused very closely on the artist and the music rather than the event or the scene. " Williams, who will play Saturday afternoon at the 37th annual Philadelphia Folk Festival at the Old Pool Farm near Schwenksville, spent 30 years laboring in various unsigned rock bands before becoming a folk artist 10 years ago. He is celebrating his 40th year without a real job. "Back in my rock days," he recalls, "I played for 20 or 30 thousand people in a stadium and I never could see the . . . faces.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE PHILADELPHIA Folk Festival last weekend wasn't the same without Dante Bucci. Dante, who died last Wednesday, had been taking his unique way of making music to the festival since 2001. His instrument was the "hang," a kind of drum in the shape of a flying saucer, balanced on the lap and played with hands and fingers. The music Dante produced with this odd device, much of it of his own composition, was unlike anything heard from traditional instruments. Its sound is usually described as "dreamlike" and "haunting.
NEWS
August 16, 2007
N.J. seniors ask: This is property-tax relief? My husband and I live in Cape May Court House. We are both on Social Security, as are most people who live here. Our property taxes were $5,000 a year. We received a new bill after a reassessment. We now pay $10,000. I think something is very wrong, since Gov. Corzine said property taxes would be lowered. Most people have lived here since the 1950s and are retired. They can't afford to pay these taxes and cannot sell their homes.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Michelle Shocked got downright primitive: guitar, voice, words. Yet when working together, those three elements provided a punch strong enough to knock over the sellout crowd at the Theater of Living Arts. In the first of last night's two performances in the intimate theater, Shocked played songs from her first two albums, told stories about growing up in East Texas and exhaled some poignant political beliefs. Shocked, dressed in a turtleneck, jeans and her trademark cap, got down to business right away, playing her singles "Anchorage" and "When I Grow Up," both from Short Sharp Shocked, as the first two songs in her 90-minute show.
NEWS
April 25, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Volunteers will roll up their sleeves and dig into their work at the Brandywine Valley Association's Myrick Conservation Center Saturday, joining a community effort to protect and restore the area surrounding the Brandywine Creek. "Essentially, we are a nonprofit organization and we don't have a lot of staff," said Dave Johnson, land manager for the association, "so if there are people willing to come out of their own good will and help us out, it's much appreciated and very useful.
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NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's keeping the Philadelphia Folk Festival - in its 54th annual incarnation - humming like a well-oiled music box this sunny weekend at the Old Pool Farm in Upper Salford Township? It takes a family. Make that three generations of family now, both bloodlined and "extended. " All bonding over the music, the colorful (often tie-dyed) scene, the shared and embracing sense of community. "Even people you don't know, you feel like you do," suggested second generation festival-goer and sometime volunteer Barrett Oterson.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE PHILADELPHIA Folk Festival last weekend wasn't the same without Dante Bucci. Dante, who died last Wednesday, had been taking his unique way of making music to the festival since 2001. His instrument was the "hang," a kind of drum in the shape of a flying saucer, balanced on the lap and played with hands and fingers. The music Dante produced with this odd device, much of it of his own composition, was unlike anything heard from traditional instruments. Its sound is usually described as "dreamlike" and "haunting.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2014 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
South Philly resident Bert Olson - who, along with his wife and three kids, is one of more than 2,000 volunteers at this weekend's Philadelphia Folk Festival - considers the venerable event both a "throwback to an older time," and a "great way to discover new music. " Indeed, that unique mix of old and new is part of what makes the festival, now in its 53d year, so special for music lovers of all ages and interests, according to Lisa Schwartz, president of the Philadelphia Folksong Society: "There really is something for everyone - from very established folk performers, to very up-and-coming talents.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
PHILADELPHIA Folk Festival organizers often ponder, "How you gonna get the kids down on the farm?" The Old Pool Farm in Upper Salford Township, that is - "a 45-minute commute from the city that seems so far away to a lot of people," noted talent booker Jesse Lundy. Last year, for better and worse, the team plugged in some rock-'n'-soul-centric Philly "folks" to motor-vate reluctant travelers, with decidedly mixed results. (Todd Rungren, unwilling to ease on down the acoustic road, will probably not be invited back.)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The 17th annual Korean Folk Festival for Children returns on Saturday at John Russell Field in LaMott, Cheltenham Township. From 1 to 5 p.m. enjoy culture and traditional games. Children can do rice-cake smashing, practice yoga, make masks, and have their faces painted. They can test their strength in a tug-of-war competition and play on a Korean seesaw. There will be performances and cuisine such as stir-fried rice cakes, barbecue beef, and seaweed rolls. 17th annual Korean Folk Festival for Children, 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday at John Russell Field, Penrose and Willow Avenues in the LaMott section of Cheltenham Twp. Rain date is Sept.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A hilly expanse of rural Schwenksville was a kaleidoscope of color Saturday. On the hill overlooking the Philadelphia Folk Festival's main stage, the green grass was covered by a patchwork of royal-blue tarps, purple blankets, and rainbow-backed beach chairs. Many attendees, admiring performers on stages flanked by multicolored murals and signs, wore brightly colored garb, from red and blue bandanas to tie-dye shirts. And a stone's throw from the music - through a wooded area where dozens of hammocks hung between trees - hundreds of tents covered a large field, creating a temporary weekend village for thousands of happy festivalgoers.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
"DON'T MESS with my fest!" For sure, some old-school folkniks attending this weekend's Philadelphia Folk Festival will be whining that line. But we're thinking that the general populace will rejoice at some offbeat bookings for the 52nd annual get-together on the Old Pool Farm, in Upper Salford Township, acts intended to make this homey event even more user-friendly and connectable. As ever, there's lots at the fest that qualifies as tried and true folk music, from Celtic talents ( Burning Bridget Cleary , RUNA )
NEWS
August 4, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Last weekend, instead of hanging around for the XPoNential Music Festival in Camden or the Mad Decent Block Party across the river at Penn's Landing, I headed north more than 300 miles, to the Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island. I'd never been. Newport belongs among U.S. music festivals that were 1960s flashpoints, along with Woodstock, Altamont, and, to a lesser extent, Monterey. Joan Baez rose to stardom at Newport in 1959 (the very first year of the fest, born five years after the inaugural Newport Jazz Festival)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not just the music that's traditional. For many of those attending this weekend's 51st annual Philadelphia Folk Festival, the event has become a de facto yearly reunion, not to be missed regardless of the demands of pregnancy, puberty, or parenthood. "There were a few lean years, trying to get the tradition going. . . . Now it is fully entrenched," said longtime festival attendee Marty Devaney, 47. "We're at the point where we now see people that we've known for 20 years, and we only see once a year.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN the Philadelphia Folk Festival locks into gear at noon Friday on the Old Pool Farm in Upper Salford Township, it won't be with some old-timey string band, rural bluesman or British chantey singer. Michigan-based singer/songwriter Chris Bathgate has a slow-rockin', bittersweet-romantic aura that could win the hearts of the same teens and twentysomethings who pant for a John Mayer or Ed Sheeran. And that's exactly the selling point for so much of this weekend's festival in Schwenksville.
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