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Folk Hero

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1993 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Two different movies about the lives of two different men - one saintly, one not so saintly - top this week's list of new movies on video. KORCZAK 1/2 (1990) (New Yorker) $79.95. 118 minutes. Wojtek Pszoniak, Ewa Dalkowska. Just because you're chronicling a saint's life, there's no reason to get all sanctimonious about it. This is always a danger for biographers of martyrs, and in the past has been a trap in which Polish director Andrzej Wajda (Man of Iron, Danton) occasionally got stuck.
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Staff writer Bob Fernandez contributed to this article
Joey Coyle, the South Philadelphia longshoreman who became a local folk hero a dozen years ago when he found $1.2 million in cash that had fallen from an armored car, was discovered hanging in the stairwell of his home early yesterday. The Medical Examiner's Office ruled his death a suicide. According to police, Coyle's body was found shortly after 1 a.m., dangling from an electrical cord between the first floor and basement of 2605 South Second St., where he had lived for several years with his girlfriend, Paulette DeCaro.
SPORTS
December 23, 1997 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ty Detmer didn't need to read the fine print in Rodney Peete's new three-year contract to know what it meant for him. Detmer, who began this season as the Eagles' starting quarterback, will be an unrestricted free agent. "Now I won't have to worry about them matching any offer, I don't think," Detmer said yesterday after cleaning out his Veterans Stadium locker for the last time. "I'm happy for the opportunity I got here, and I'll just move on from there. " As for where he'll go, a number of teams will be looking for a starting quarterback in the off-season.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | By C.R. Harper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Not everyone who saw Tom Paxton perform at Borders Books & Music yesterday knew that he is a folk legend with an international following, one of the famous protest songwriters of the 1960s Greenwich Village cafe scene. Some were there just to dance, clap and pretend to be zoo animals. "I like his music because it's fun," said Sean Weldon, 5, of Malvern. Sean was among about 20 or so children - and about 30 adults - who watched Paxton sing and play a selection of his children's songs and read from one of his five children's books at a brief and informal appearance.
NEWS
May 13, 1986
I lost my breakfast on April 26 after reading the article "Osage Avenue builder to publish a newspaper. " It is absolutely amazing that Ernest A. Edwards Jr. continues to smell like a rose even after he disgraces and brings discredit to our great city because of his failure in rebuilding Osage Avenue homes. This incompetent black "folk hero," as he calls himself, is organizing a black newspaper called the Sunday Press. Before people even read this newspaper, they should remember that Mr. Edwards is the same man who was entrusted by the city to rebuild the Osage Avenue houses in a professional, painless and quick manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Shekhar Kapur's Bandit Queen, the subject of enormous controversy in India, is a searing and powerful indictment of the exploitation and abuse of women and the caste system that hinges on a true, if incredible story. Kapur's blunt and stunning picture is based on the autobiography of Phoolan Devi, a child bride who was abandoned by her husband and became an outcast. Eventually, she took up with a gang of bandits and came to lead them, becoming both a folk hero and a symbol of hope and defiance for millions of low-caste peasants.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrick Rodgers, the self-styled Philadelphia "vampire" whose celebrated legal fight with Wells Fargo Home Mortgage garnered national headlines last year, is a big Ron Paul fan. So the music promoter with custom-made fangs is attempting to get on the Pennsylvania primary ballot as a delegate for the Republican presidential candidate. If he wins a spot, he can then go to the Republican National Convention in August in Tampa, Fla., to support Paul. Vampire. Republican convention.
NEWS
February 27, 1986
Fidelity Bank has entered an agreement with the Eastern North Philadelphia Initiative Coalition to make approximately $50 million available to residents of Kensington and North Philadelphia. Under the "agreement," residents will be able to obtain loans at 1 percentage point below market rates, 1.5 points below if the borrower is a member of the "coalition. " The origination fee will be reduced from the customary 3 percent fee to 1 percent for this favored group. There will be a six-month moratorium on foreclosures for failure to make payments.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
The more outdated something is, the more in it becomes. The Proclaimers, a Scottish duo who played the Theater of Living Arts last night before a very receptive crowd of 200 people, hammered that point home. Twins Craig and Charlie Reid wore eyeglasses, clothes and hair styles that made them look like they'd be the last to leave computer lab in high school. THey could have easily passed as extras from the cast of My Three Sons. Their musical style, however, is right on the cutting edge, even if it happens to be a throwback to the folk-oriented days of Uncle Charlie, Chipand the gang.
SPORTS
May 10, 2008 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wag-ging his tongue Mets reliever Billy Wagner concedes he's a bit like a cranky old man, capable of speaking out at any time, against anyone, on anything. Wagner, 36, who spent two seasons with the Phils, doesn't care how anyone reacts to what he says, and that includes his general manager, Omar Minaya, and manager, Willie Randolph. He knows time is running out for his chance to be on a championship team. "I've got two years," Wagner told the Bergen Record. "I'm losing a lot of patience.
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SPORTS
March 23, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
It is an article of faith now in professional sports. The regular season is relevant only as a means to gain entry into the postseason. First place, eighth place, top seed, fifth seed - none of that matters, as long as you get in. The St. Louis Cardinals weren't better than the Phillies or the Texas Rangers last season. They were hotter in October and that's what mattered. The New York Giants were a steaming mess in the middle of the season, but rode a wave through the NFC playoffs and into another Super Bowl title.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrick Rodgers, the self-styled Philadelphia "vampire" whose celebrated legal fight with Wells Fargo Home Mortgage garnered national headlines last year, is a big Ron Paul fan. So the music promoter with custom-made fangs is attempting to get on the Pennsylvania primary ballot as a delegate for the Republican presidential candidate. If he wins a spot, he can then go to the Republican National Convention in August in Tampa, Fla., to support Paul. Vampire. Republican convention.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
FOR SURE, there'll be some very familiar faces at the 50th annual Philadelphia Folk Festival, returning to the Old Pool Farm in Upper Salford Township in two weeks. Seasoned perennials such as Arlo Guthrie, Tom Rush, Tom Paxton and David Bromberg are among the guests coming back for the big birthday party, along with some of their rarely here contemporaries (Levon Helm, Jorma Kaukonen) and young turks of note like the Wood Brothers, Justin Townes Earle, Hoots & Hellmouth, Dan Bern and Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
If there's comfort in the mixed verdict on former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, it's knowing that Philadelphians aren't alone in the uphill battle against corruption. Chicago is Philly's rival in pay-to-play politics, and it showed in the cheers for Democrat Blagojevich after the verdict. A federal jury convicted him on only one of 24 charges, deadlocking on all other counts. Blagojevich was spared a worse fate by one holdout juror. Prosecutors vow to retry the case, which includes allegations that Blagojevich tried to sell the U.S. Senate seat formerly held by President Obama.
NEWS
July 18, 2010
A model of fiscal probity I had to pinch myself to be sure I was awake when I saw the signer of the letter that criticized spending stimulus money on antismoking and food programs, in part because "everybody is tightening his or her belt" and some of the proposed expenditures are "a slap in the face to those Philadelphians who lost their jobs and homes to the slumping economy. " Simply unbelievable that this message ("Put federal money where it's really needed," Thursday) is brought to us by Joan L. Krajewski, who collected a reported DROP payment of $274,587 in 2008, retired for one day, and then bounced right back onto City Council.
NEWS
March 9, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Iron Age Theatre likes its history bloody and full of highly combustible racial tension (its last production, The Life of John Henry, placed the folk hero on a Southern chain gang). Thankfully, history - and drama - are happy to oblige. British playwright Simon Gray's 1978 The Rear Column watches a quintet of Victorian soldiers and gentlemen unravel in a Congo military encampment, surrounded by inscrutable natives, gunslinging Arab slave traders, cannibals, disease and death, dutifully awaiting the return of one H.M. Stanley.
SPORTS
December 7, 2008 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anybody who has ever played ice hockey - or even pickup street hockey - knows how defenseless it feels to be trailing a play as an opponent streaks down the ice/court on a breakaway. That's why Flyers winger Scott Hartnell has become a folk hero of sorts. Even if he did make a dumb play. Anybody who has ever played hockey has felt like doing what Hartnell did in the Flyers' draining 4-3 overtime win over Tampa Bay on Tuesday. With 16.3 seconds left in regulation and the score tied at 3-3, Tampa's Ryan Malone went in on a breakaway.
SPORTS
May 10, 2008 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wag-ging his tongue Mets reliever Billy Wagner concedes he's a bit like a cranky old man, capable of speaking out at any time, against anyone, on anything. Wagner, 36, who spent two seasons with the Phils, doesn't care how anyone reacts to what he says, and that includes his general manager, Omar Minaya, and manager, Willie Randolph. He knows time is running out for his chance to be on a championship team. "I've got two years," Wagner told the Bergen Record. "I'm losing a lot of patience.
NEWS
December 26, 2007 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Which annoys you most? The admonition "Listen carefully, as our options have changed"; the assertion "Your call is important to us"; or the line "Is there anything else I can help you with today?" when in fact, the agent didn't resolve the problem you called about in the first place? Write your answer on the back of a notice about your Internet provider's privacy policy, fold it carefully and put it in a glass that is half full - because it looks as if we're closing in on the end of the dreaded voice-mail maze.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2007
BET AWARDS 2007. 8 tonight, BET. DON CHEADLE AS the late great Petey Greene? I couldn't quite see it. Being from the nonofficial side of Washington, D.C. - or Chocolate City, as Petey used to refer to it - I've never forgotten this folk hero and the profound impact he made on the city of Washington during the turbulent late 1960s and '70s. Petey Greene was a street cat, as they used to say. He wore platform shoes, bell-bottoms, wide lapels and other flamboyant styles of the era. He couldn't conjugate a verb correctly if his life depended on it. But you know what, he didn't care.
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