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Folk Music

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NEWS
April 7, 1991 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The Circlewood Coffee House will continue its series of folk-music performances with an April 19 concert of Irish music by the Wood's Tea Company, starting at 8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the Unitarian Church of Cherry Hill on 401 N. Kings Highway. The Coffee House is "going on its second year" of presenting folk-music shows, said Laurie McCarthy Bates, who does publicity for the all-volunteer group. "We're not trying to make a profit," although group members wouldn't mind if they did, Bates said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1989 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everyone talks about the "new folk" these days, but whatever happened to the "old folk"? The people who first listened to the old folk music when it was new folk music may have families, cars and mortgage payments now, but a lot of them still get the urge to spread a blanket on the grass and listen to the kind of music that is nothing more than a sweet voice and a guitar. Fortunately, there are still plenty of old folk singers out there, traveling the lonesome highways and byways of America with their acoustic guitars.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1992 | By David S. Rotenstein, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
For Philadelphia folkies, summertime is festival time. This summer it seems as if everyone is getting into the act of staging a folk festival or concert series. From mom-and-pop restaurants to small-town recreation departments, folk music is popular music. There certainly is no lack of venues for folk music year-round. But the grass-roots groups that temporarily take over church community halls and recreation rooms as the Cherry Tree Music Co-op and the Folk Factory in Philadelphia and the CircleWood Coffeehouse in Cherry Hill at other times of the year defer to outdoor spots in June, July and August.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
'There is no room for folk music in the commercial music business anymore, and I'm doing my best to keep it alive on the Internet, where hopefully these songs will live on," Roger McGuinn says. Along with his band, the Byrds, McGuinn essentially invented the genre of folk-rock in the mid-'60s by electrifying Bob Dylan's acoustic songs with Beatlesque harmony and chiming guitars. He had cut his teeth on folk music, playing with the Limeliters and the Chad Mitchell Trio before forming the Byrds in 1964.
NEWS
March 16, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sue Deckhart's business card reads: certified medical transcriptionist, songwriter, folk musician. Deckhart, who busily transcribes for three medical practices, still makes time to direct Mom & Pop's Coffeehouse, a folk-music series she started nine years ago at United Christian Church on New Falls Road. The coffeehouse, which has grown from nine to 15 concerts a year, has attracted the likes of Michael Cooney, Small Potatoes, and Kim and Reggie Harris. Featured performers play without a guaranteed fee, getting paid from donations taken at the gate and at the baked-goods table, Deckhart said.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
When the Bulgarian State Radio and Television Female Vocal Choir performed at International House in November, its instrumental accompaniment was an afterthought. The plucked stringed instrument known as the tambura provided the singers with guide tones. Musicians only occasionally outlined the writhing melodies and even then seemed deep in the background. The stabbing syncopations and ear-bending counterlines of Bulgarian folk music would seem suited to a merger of vocal and instrumental styles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
This first weekend of spring brings a musical garden of earthy delights, with a special emphasis on back-to-the-roots folk music, appropriately. Tonight and tomorrow, the Philadelphia Bluegrass and Old-Time Music Festival will be blooming at the Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School in Plymouth Meeting. This evening at 7:30, the flowers of the folksy musical world include the Seldom Scene, Nashville Bluegrass Band, the Lonesome River Band and the Tacky Branch Ramblers. Tomorrow afternoon, beginning at noon, the fest swings into workshops with the music of Uncle Dave Macon, Charlie Poole, Cockerham and Jarrell, interpersed with concert sets with Mountain Laurel, Dry Branch Fire Squad and Roger Spring, Hal Wylie and the Progressive Bluegrassers.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / CARL A. BREITINGER
Russian Poteshki, a folk-musical group from the Soviet Union, visited the area recently and appeared at the Moorestown Mall for a free concert that included such native instruments as the balalaika and the domra. While in the area, the group stayed in Moorestown, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1996 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If John Zorn plays klezmer music, he does so by throwing it into his jazz stew and letting the listener sort it out. The saxophonist and composer performed Sunday night at International House with Masada, a pianoless quartet, a la Ornette Coleman; many of his compositions, on the surface, came off straight ahead, with deep roots in bop. But deeper listening did bring into focus Zorn's intentions. Throughout the evening's two sets, the quartet provided an intellectual, well-realized combining of traditions - the blues and European Jewish folk music - that share many affinities.
NEWS
December 27, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Temple Sinai will hold its first program at its newly opened Cantor's Cafe in Norristown at 8 p.m. Jan. 12. The evening will feature the synagogue's cantor, Stephen Freedman, who will present Hebrew, Israeli and Yiddish folk music. Freeman is an accomplished folksinger and composer who often performs his own arrangements as well as traditional songs. Light refreshments will be available. Tickets are $18 in advance and $20 at the door. Call 215-643-6510 for tickets or reservations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
Time-tested and traditional American music sounds freshly invigorated and deeply personal in the hands of Alynda Lee Segarra. She's the front woman of the New Orleans folk band Hurray for the Riff Raff, which plays World Cafe Live tonight. They have emerged with Small Town Heroes , a sterling set of Segarra-penned originals. It's the band's fifth full-length release but its first to reach a wide audience. Attention-grabbing performances at last year's Newport Folk Festival and this year's South by Southwest have put a spotlight on Segarra, 27, a New York-born singer of Puerto Rican descent who is impressively adept at putting a modern spin on vintage roots-music forms.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
There was something about listening for patterns and pitches in Webern's Four Pieces that made it perfect ear training for what was about to come. And so when the music launched from Webern's terse 1910 essay right into Beethoven without a breath, it felt perfectly natural - turning the Webern into an ascetic introduction to Beethoven's drama of being human. Smart construction was just one strong aspect to Tuesday night's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital at the Perelman by violinist Christian Tetzlaff and pianist Lars Vogt.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Pete Seeger, 94, the folksinger and social-justice advocate who popularized "We Shall Overcome" as an anthem of the civil-rights movement, wrote "Turn! Turn! Turn!", and had a career spanning more than seven decades, has died. Kitama Cahill-Jackson, the singer's grandson, told the Associated Press that Mr. Seeger died in his sleep about 9:30 p.m. Monday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he had been for six days. President Obama praised the man Carl Sandburg once called "America's tuning fork": "Over the years, Pete used his voice - and his hammer - to strike blows for workers' rights and civil rights; world peace and environmental conservation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Lisa Schwartz remembers a time not too long ago when folk music "wasn't considered particularly cool" - a development not lost on organizers of the annual Philadelphia Folk Festival. By the start of the last decade, younger music fans had stopped gravitating en masse to the venerable weekend-long event. But in recent years - with roots-rock bands like Mumford & Sons, the Lumineers, and the Avett Brothers wooing listeners in their 20s and 30s - " 'Trad' became 'rad,' " said Schwartz, president of the Philadelphia Folksong Society, which organizes the festival.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
"DON'T MESS with my fest!" For sure, some old-school folkniks attending this weekend's Philadelphia Folk Festival will be whining that line. But we're thinking that the general populace will rejoice at some offbeat bookings for the 52nd annual get-together on the Old Pool Farm, in Upper Salford Township, acts intended to make this homey event even more user-friendly and connectable. As ever, there's lots at the fest that qualifies as tried and true folk music, from Celtic talents ( Burning Bridget Cleary , RUNA )
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Jan L. Apple, For The Inquirer
Benita Segal does not underestimate the healing power of music. In fact, it is only when she picks up one of her 10 guitars and begins strumming, singing, and creating her "alternative country" sound that she truly feels at peace. "I get lost in the guitar, in the music," explained the 59-year-old Mount Laurel resident, who has been reinventing herself since 2006 with an art form she dabbled in as a teenager. That was in an era, she says, of flower children, folk music and the antiwar movement; a culture influenced by Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Croce.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN the Philadelphia Folk Festival locks into gear at noon Friday on the Old Pool Farm in Upper Salford Township, it won't be with some old-timey string band, rural bluesman or British chantey singer. Michigan-based singer/songwriter Chris Bathgate has a slow-rockin', bittersweet-romantic aura that could win the hearts of the same teens and twentysomethings who pant for a John Mayer or Ed Sheeran. And that's exactly the selling point for so much of this weekend's festival in Schwenksville.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Two years after singer-songwriter Anaïs Mitchell released the ambitious and career-defining folk opera Hadestown - a musical retelling of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice set in Depression-era America - she's back with a decidedly different but equally ambitious effort, Young Man in America. Produced by Todd Sickafoose, who also helmed Hadestown, the new album features several New York-based rock and experimental jazz musicians, and has Mitchell inhabiting several musical characters, male and female.
NEWS
October 6, 2011
Bert Jansch, 67, a legendary folk guitarist, died in London on Wednesday after a long battle with lung cancer. Mr. Jansch was a founding member of the influential group Pentangle, which won wide acclaim in the late 1960s and the 1970s, and he also enjoyed a solo career that spanned five decades and more than 25 albums. Known for his gentle eloquence on the acoustic guitar, the Scottish-born Mr. Jansch was a central figure in the British folk-music revival in the 1960s and played to appreciative audiences throughout the world for many decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2011
Special Events Animal Care & Control Team's Kitten Ice Cream Social Enjoy free ice cream and learn more about providing foster care for kittens. Philadelphia Animal Care & Control Shelter, 111 West Hunting Park Ave. loveaphillycat.com. 7/9. Noon-3 pm. Hispanic Fiesta Celebration of Latin cultures around the world. Dancing, folk music, crafts & more. Penn's Landing, Columbus Blvd.; 215-922-2386. Closes 7/10. Holistic Nutrition for Dogs and Cats Presentation by Dr. Natasha Kassell.
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