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Folk Rock

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
The best show of the week is Sunday night's double bill of 10,000 Maniacs and Tracy Chapman. The Maniacs are a folk-rock quintet featuring the songs and voice of Natalie Merchant. Listeners attracted to the group's In My Tribe by its fetching cover version of Cat Stevens' "Peace Train" were quick to find that 10,000 Maniacs had even better originals. "Hey Jack Kerouac" is a knowing portrait of the Beat Generation writers, and "Don't Talk" is an alluring tune about a one-sided conversation with a drunk.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lyle Lovett's debut album last year established him as a talented singer- songwriter who was accepted in the country-music genre, but his follow-up, Pontiac (MCA ) is a puzzle. Little of this music could be characterized as country, and Lovett's voice sounds more than ever like that of cult folk-rock performer Jesse Winchester. Lovett also exposes a nasty streak in such sexist junk as "She's No Lady" and "She's Hot to Go. " In general, this is a disappointment. House of Freaks Monkey on a Chain Gang (Rhino )
NEWS
April 19, 2013
1DAWES "Cosmic American Music" offers bittersweet, Southern California-style folk rock that will scrub you clean but might break a romantic heart. 2OLLY MURS Hot British pop export pumps out vigorous, danceable tunes in the Bruno Mars vein on "Right Place Right Time. " Don't slip! 3FLAMING LIPS Chill with "The Terror," a spacey, techno-tuned set of ambient hippie rock. 4KIM RICHEY Alt-country devotees will enjoy sharing the shower with this Americana girl's best set yet, "Thorn in My Heart.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | by Jim Farber, New York Daily News
Rock isn't dead, it's just wheezing on life support. For proof, check the trends on Billboard's Top 200. The highest-charting hard guitar band lands all the way down at No. 24 (the Foo Fighters' "The Colour and the Shape"). For more loud guitars you have to scroll down to 28 (Aerosmith), then plunge to 42 (the still-struggling U2). Other genres can't be crying over this. For makers of pop, country and rap, things couldn't look sunnier. The current Top Ten features two hip-hop records - "Wu Tang Clan Forever" at No. 1 and Notorious B.I.G.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Earnest folk, cool jazz, and flip, hip, beat poetry all coexisted comfortably in the smoky coffeehouses of the 1950s. So why shouldn't those art forms cohabit now? That's one ambition of the worldly wise and often wonderful new Devonsquare album "Industrial Twilight," a three-suite journey through existential dilemmas and contemporary survival. The group will be introducing the material live tomorrow at Tin Angel. "Frankly, it's been a reach for radio to play it," concedes the group's Herb Ludwig.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
"This is not a rock concert," Midlake's Eric Pulido announced midway through its show Saturday at the TLA. "This is a soft folk-rock soiree. " Given that Pulido was one of the seven-piece band's four guitar players, the remark was more than a little tongue-in-cheek. But there's little doubt that Midlake spent much of the four years preceding the January release of The Courage of Others internalizing the sound of British folk-rock giants like Fairport Convention and Pentangle, as well as present-day descendants like Philadelphia's Espers, whose mixture of acoustic fingerpicking and electric power-chords set the scene for Saturday's show.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Brian G. Howard, For The Inquirer
With a shiny new Grammy Award under their belts, English folk-rock juggernaut Mumford & Sons stormed the Camden Waterfront on Saturday for the first of two sold-out nights at the Susquehanna Bank Center. The band emerged from behind a curtain adorned with its top-hatted Gentlemen of the Road logo to kick off the set with "Babel," the title track of the newly minted best album of 2012. In the midst of a whirlwind couple of weeks, the band members - Marcus Mumford on guitar, mandolin, and kick drum, Winston Marshall on banjo and guitar, Ben Lovett on keys and accordion, and Ted Dwayne on electric and standup bass - lived up to their reputation as stellar live performers, playing most of the set as a harmonizing four-man front before a largely unmanned drum set. Save for a few songs on which Mumford (who began his career as Laura Marling's skinsman)
NEWS
January 10, 1988 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
It's a rock band's nightmare. The band is booked into a South Jersey club for a five-night stand. This is the big one, the gig that band members are hoping will lead to stardom: a steady job in Atlantic City, an appearance on Star Search, a recording contract with Columbia Records, the opening act at the Spectrum. . . . But wait - the bass player has quit with only three days' notice. It's the sort of problem that Bob Federici and Michael Fortuna, both 26- year-old Pennsauken rock musicians, have seen plague their colleagues all too often.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most clever and moving collection of old rock material to be released this year is Heyday (Hannibal ) by Fairport Convention. This album gathers a dozen songs that this legendary English folk-rock group recorded in 1968 and '69, tunes ranging from Leonard Cohen's "Bird on a Wire" to Johnny Cash's "I Still Miss Someone," all of them witty, knowing and passionate. JOHN GORKA I Know (Red House ): What a fine folk-music record. Gorka's strong, warm voice is instantly disarming, confiding, and his lyrics are sharply observant about subjects ranging from his lover's hair to cows standing in a winter field.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1998 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
The difference between musicians who flip burgers during the day and those who wake around two in the afternoon after a night of rocking packed concert halls is a secret the men don't know but the little girls understand. Take the Goo Goo Dolls, for instance. After nine years of churning out catchy, if forgettable, power pop over the course of five albums, three on a major label, band members were still working day jobs. And then along came a song called "Name," an achy-breaky folk-rock carol that played in seeming perpetuity on radio, and the boys named Goo could finally leave the spatulas and the paper hats behind.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For a guy who claims that his musical awakening came when hearing Don McLean's poignant "Vincent (Starry, Starry Night)" on an episode of The Simpsons , there's nothing cartoonish about Jake Bugg. The 19-year-old from Nottingham, England, old for his age, makes music and writes lyrics too bracing and swaggeringly working-class to be dippy. Animated and cocksure, yes, but never comical. From the erstwhile sound of Sunday's way-sold-out World Cafe Live gig, filled with young teens and elder punks, Bugg pulls inspiration from Bo Diddley, Massachusetts -era Bee Gees, early Dylan, Buddy Holly, and the folksy Marc Bolan (a la Tyrannosaurus Rex )
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Lisa Schwartz remembers a time not too long ago when folk music "wasn't considered particularly cool" - a development not lost on organizers of the annual Philadelphia Folk Festival. By the start of the last decade, younger music fans had stopped gravitating en masse to the venerable weekend-long event. But in recent years - with roots-rock bands like Mumford & Sons, the Lumineers, and the Avett Brothers wooing listeners in their 20s and 30s - " 'Trad' became 'rad,' " said Schwartz, president of the Philadelphia Folksong Society, which organizes the festival.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
1DAWES "Cosmic American Music" offers bittersweet, Southern California-style folk rock that will scrub you clean but might break a romantic heart. 2OLLY MURS Hot British pop export pumps out vigorous, danceable tunes in the Bruno Mars vein on "Right Place Right Time. " Don't slip! 3FLAMING LIPS Chill with "The Terror," a spacey, techno-tuned set of ambient hippie rock. 4KIM RICHEY Alt-country devotees will enjoy sharing the shower with this Americana girl's best set yet, "Thorn in My Heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Brian G. Howard, For The Inquirer
With a shiny new Grammy Award under their belts, English folk-rock juggernaut Mumford & Sons stormed the Camden Waterfront on Saturday for the first of two sold-out nights at the Susquehanna Bank Center. The band emerged from behind a curtain adorned with its top-hatted Gentlemen of the Road logo to kick off the set with "Babel," the title track of the newly minted best album of 2012. In the midst of a whirlwind couple of weeks, the band members - Marcus Mumford on guitar, mandolin, and kick drum, Winston Marshall on banjo and guitar, Ben Lovett on keys and accordion, and Ted Dwayne on electric and standup bass - lived up to their reputation as stellar live performers, playing most of the set as a harmonizing four-man front before a largely unmanned drum set. Save for a few songs on which Mumford (who began his career as Laura Marling's skinsman)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
OK, so maybe it was not the best day to be chatting with Teddy Thompson. Not about his sterling new (fifth) album of string-endowed "countrypolitan" pop arias and snappy folk rock, "Bella," or his show tonight at the Tin Angel, let alone his intriguing backstory as a second-generation performer. The kitchen cabinets in his New York apartment had come unhinged. And repairmen banging loudly in the background during our phone chat had uncovered a mess more trouble. "It's the gift that keeps on giving," Thompson growled.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010
Blitzen Trapper As beardy indie rock dudes from the Pacific Northwest go, the Portland, Ore., quintet Blitzen Trapper are more manically energetic and stylistically varied than most. And on the band's '70s-centric new album Destroyer of the Void , lead singer and songwriter Eric Earley - who doesn't even have a beard - does display serious accomplishment and affection for Me Decade rock stylings, from Laurel Canyon country folk to Electric Light Orchestra prog-pop to Bob Dylan-inspired wheezy-voiced word-slinging.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
"This is not a rock concert," Midlake's Eric Pulido announced midway through its show Saturday at the TLA. "This is a soft folk-rock soiree. " Given that Pulido was one of the seven-piece band's four guitar players, the remark was more than a little tongue-in-cheek. But there's little doubt that Midlake spent much of the four years preceding the January release of The Courage of Others internalizing the sound of British folk-rock giants like Fairport Convention and Pentangle, as well as present-day descendants like Philadelphia's Espers, whose mixture of acoustic fingerpicking and electric power-chords set the scene for Saturday's show.
NEWS
July 13, 2008 | By Elizabeth Eisenstadt Evans FOR THE INQUIRER
Joining forces to offer an informal night of God-themed contemporary song and fellowship, four church bands are planning to bring their lively sacred sounds to Downingtown's Kerr Park next Saturday night. Inaugurated five years ago by the town's Central Presbyterian Church, "Praise In the Park" will feature sets by musicians from four area churches. It will run from 6-9 p.m. Concert organizers estimate they had 300-400 area residents show up to listen and sing along at last year's three-hour event.
NEWS
June 18, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Peter Buck put his foot down. When it came time for R.E.M. to record the follow-up to its lethargic, keyboard-drenched 2004 album Around the Sun, the guitarist for the Athens, Ga.-born alt-rock heroes made sure his bandmates, Michael Stipe and Mike Mills, knew exactly where he stood. "Basically, that record has nothing to do with who I am as a musician or a person," says Buck, whose ringing Rickenbacker guitar gave R.E.M. its distinctive sound on 1980s abstract folk-rock albums like Murmur and Fables of the Reconstruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2001 | by Jonathan Takiff Daily News Staff Writer
Spring will really hang you up the most, unless you get out to one of these cool music happenings this weekend. A taste of Honey Honeydogs "Here's Luck" (Palm Pictures) was one of the tragic failures of 2000, a stellar but poorly promoted pop rock album that never found its audience. But don't miss the chance to catch these California-based, British rock-lovin' guys tonight at the North Star. Lead singer/songwriter Adam Levy is a first-rate pop formalist in the John Lennon vein - a devotee of mordant lead (and tight harmony)
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