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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Nicole Laporte, New York Times News Service
LOS ANGELES - "Some people say: 'Maude Apatow is my spirit animal.' I get that a lot," Maude Apatow said. "They tweet it to me. " Over a coconut milk smoothie at a trendy vegan restaurant in Los Angeles, Maude was describing the rather intense fascination she has inspired on Twitter, where she has more than 62,000 followers. That may not compare to Lady Gaga's total, but considering she is a 14-year-old just out of braces, not a celebrity and not someone who has done anything outrageous on YouTube, it's an impressive fan base.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Wise thinks about Phil Bengtson. "Most people never heard of us, Phil Bengtson and me," he says, "because there is no slot in the record books for what you might call famous followers. " Phil Bengtson, you may not remember, was coach of the Green Bay Packers for three years in the late '60s and early '70s. All he had to do was follow the legendary Vince Lombardi, whose teams won league championships in each of the three years before Bengtson's takeover. Bengtson never made the playoffs during his three years as head coach.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
ISEE THE leftists are screaming about Christine O'Donnell's "shady past. " Maybe they should look into Obama's past, and the czars he has around him. Ayres. Holdren. Holder. Jennings. Lloyd. Dunn. Jarrett. Sunstein. Nice Marxists, all of them. Pat Dougherty Philadelphia
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
Three former Church of Our First Love members say church leader Anthony Marcolongo has an unquenchable desire to control the lives - and minds - of his followers. The three, who spoke on condition that they not be named, say Marcolongo, who started his church in 1983, made rigorous demands on his group. Marcolongo, a 33-year-old Glenolden native, demanded that followers fast Wednesday through Friday, attend one-hour morning prayer sessions five days a week and evening prayer services three times weekly, they said.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jingduan Yang's mother wants him to shut up. Stop talking, she tells him in her phone calls from China. Her youngest son, a Thomas Jefferson University Hospital psychiatrist, is only getting his big sister in more trouble. "She's in again and it's all because of you," Yang said his 79-year-old mother, Sun Yixia, told him. "Don't say anything. Be quiet. " But Yang refuses. The 40-year-old native of Hefei, in China's Anhui Province, wants anyone who will listen to know that his sister, Jingfang Yang, is imprisoned in China because of her belief in the spiritual meditation practice of Falun Gong.
NEWS
May 21, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her devotees believe she is the Hindu goddess of knowledge: a reincarnation of Divine Mother Saraswati, consort of Brahma. But officials at Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wynnewood say Hindus have no business using their Christian campus to promote their beliefs. Yesterday, the seminary canceled tonight's scheduled lecture by Indian holy woman Sri Karunamayi, who is in her late 30s and is nearing the end of a 13-city U.S. tour that began April 5 in Dallas. "It is our understanding that this woman is representing Hinduism," said Scott Rodin, vice president for advancement at the 460-student seminary.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last Sunday morning, Alexander Menn, one of the most beloved Russian Orthodox priests in the Soviet Union, set out on his accustomed route to church. It was 6:30 a.m. The stocky, handsome, gray-bearded priest left his wooden house, set in a grove of birch and pine, and headed for the train station of this country town. His route took him through a 300-yard stretch of forest cloaked in early morning gloom. The train would take him 15 miles to the village of Novaya Deryevnya, where he was a fabled preacher during the long years of Soviet religious oppression.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Brandt Berg, leader of the embattled Children of God religious sect, apparently has died the way he lived: shrouded in mystery. His followers say they don't know where or exactly when he died, or under what circumstances. But spokesmen for the sect in the United States and Europe say Berg's wife notified them Tuesday - in a letter from an unknown location - that their 75-year-old leader, in hiding since the early 1970s, had died. If Berg is gone (international police authorities are expressing doubts)
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Imam Warith Deen Mohammed, a national leader for African American Muslims who preaches personal responsibility and brotherhood between the races, urged his followers yesterday to practice love in the family and in government. "No one can become a believer or have faith until he practices love between his brothers and sisters," he told about 400 African American Muslims who gathered in the auditorium of Willingboro High School. The event was sponsored by eight New Jersey masjids, or congregations.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth and Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Death seems to follow Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman like a distant echo - there often seems to be a connection to his words, but it's never quite clear. There was the 1981 assassination of Egyptian President Anwar el-Sadat, which reportedly came after the blind Muslim cleric issued a decree denouncing Sadat's negotiations with Israel. There was the 1990 slaying of radical Rabbi Meir Kahane in New York. There was the killing two years ago of a Muslim man in Brooklyn who had clashed with the cleric.
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NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia police officers involved in the shooting death of Brandon Tate-Brown will not face criminal charges, District Attorney Seth Williams announced Thursday. "In this case, the facts show a tragedy, a terrible tragedy, but not a crime," Williams said at an afternoon news conference, saying his conclusion came after a three-month investigation. An attorney for the family of the 25-year-old Frankford man said questions remained in the case and indicated he would file suit.
SPORTS
March 12, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Six days ago, the Phillies were pinning their hopes of being a surprise, sleeper team on the left arm of a man who hadn't thrown in a game since July. After suffering a setback, there's a decent chance Cliff Lee won't pitch at all in 2015. So now the Phillies are hoping a guy who is coming off two surgeries and has logged all of 12 major league innings since 2012 can fill in for Lee. And the one pitcher in camp who is older and who has pitched in more games than Lee. And the International Man of Mystery, too, for good measure.
SPORTS
February 23, 2015
INDIANAPOLIS - Eric Kendricks has a tiny scar on his left cheek. He can't specifically remember the flying object that caused the gash that left the scar. But he definitely knows who was responsible. His older brother Mychal. "I think it was a rock," he said. "It definitely was something that was thrown. " The Kendricks brothers were born 17 months apart and spent a good portion of their childhood and adolescence doing what brothers close in age do - fighting and competing and destroying pretty much everything in their path.
SPORTS
February 9, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Troy Shorts could have sat behind a podium, smiled for the cellphone cameras, and put pen to paper like many top South Jersey football players did on Wednesday as part of national signing day. He could have accepted a scholarship from Central Connecticut, an NCAA Division I program that competes in the Northeast Conference with Sacred Heart, Wagner, and Bryant, among others. He could have been part of the celebratory scene on Wednesday - the attention in school, the posing for pictures, the swirl of excitement and congratulations.
SPORTS
February 5, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark Maccarone has many memories of coaching Ronnie James. His most vivid comes from his freshman season. "We put him on the field in his first game and, you know what?" the Glassboro High School football coach said. "He was so good that he never came off it until his career was over. " By Maccarone's estimation, James, a 6-foot, 180-pound safety bound for Rutgers, played in every quarter of every one of the 45 games that made up his high school career. During that time, James, named to The Inquirer's all-South Jersey second team as a defensive back, split time at safety and running back.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN THE 1970s true-life thriller All the President's Men , journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein had one basic rule for covering politics: "Follow the money. " But if the Watergate-reporting sleuths were on the trail of the 2015 Philadelphia mayor's race, they might be asking: "Where the hell did all the money go?" With yesterday's deadline for filing 2014 year-end campaign-finance reports, the major Democratic candidates laid their financial cards on the table for the first time, and no one had a royal flush.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
In the moments before Deja Brown hit the biggest shot of her life, most didn't even realize she was on the court. And of those who did, many likely wondered why. Two years ago, Brown could have passed for a middle-schooler. Her Rancocas Valley girls' basketball teammates didn't help the matter: Lauren Moses was a 6-foot-2 wrecking ball. Dominque Ward was a 5-11 guard who could dunk a basketball. Brown was a slight, 5-6 sophomore in a baggy uniform who most outside of Westampton had never heard of. "It feels like a long time ago," Brown said.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Mark Tyler awoke before dawn Tuesday, invigorated by the giant protest that had shut down Center City the previous day - and ready to confront the question on everyone's mind: What's next? Through weeks of planning, he and other organizers promised the Martin Luther King's Birthday march would be just the start, the public launch of a new movement to bring concrete change to Philadelphia. But protest can be a limited tactic, and even the best-led social movements can fizzle.
NEWS
January 22, 2015
NEW GOV. Wolf has made increasing state aid to public education one of his priorities, but to do anything about it now would be putting the cart before the horse. Before the debate begins in Harrisburg over how much to give the public schools, a decision should be made on the formula by which the money is handed out. A special commission is looking into the matter and its recommendations are due in June. One thing everyone agrees on is that the current method is out-of-date and unfair.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Columnist
Collingswood's Tyree Mann-Barnes hasn't had the best of luck playing one-on-one with his older brother Tyrone, a record that mirrors the Washington Generals' log against the Harlem Globetrotters. Yet the Collingswood senior has enjoyed much greater success against high school competition, and a lot of that can be attributed to the tutoring from his older brother. A senior guard, Tyree is averaging 13.6 points for a Collingswood team that has won six in a row since a close opening-night loss to Haddonfield.
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