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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Nicole Laporte, New York Times News Service
LOS ANGELES - "Some people say: 'Maude Apatow is my spirit animal.' I get that a lot," Maude Apatow said. "They tweet it to me. " Over a coconut milk smoothie at a trendy vegan restaurant in Los Angeles, Maude was describing the rather intense fascination she has inspired on Twitter, where she has more than 62,000 followers. That may not compare to Lady Gaga's total, but considering she is a 14-year-old just out of braces, not a celebrity and not someone who has done anything outrageous on YouTube, it's an impressive fan base.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Wise thinks about Phil Bengtson. "Most people never heard of us, Phil Bengtson and me," he says, "because there is no slot in the record books for what you might call famous followers. " Phil Bengtson, you may not remember, was coach of the Green Bay Packers for three years in the late '60s and early '70s. All he had to do was follow the legendary Vince Lombardi, whose teams won league championships in each of the three years before Bengtson's takeover. Bengtson never made the playoffs during his three years as head coach.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
ISEE THE leftists are screaming about Christine O'Donnell's "shady past. " Maybe they should look into Obama's past, and the czars he has around him. Ayres. Holdren. Holder. Jennings. Lloyd. Dunn. Jarrett. Sunstein. Nice Marxists, all of them. Pat Dougherty Philadelphia
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
Three former Church of Our First Love members say church leader Anthony Marcolongo has an unquenchable desire to control the lives - and minds - of his followers. The three, who spoke on condition that they not be named, say Marcolongo, who started his church in 1983, made rigorous demands on his group. Marcolongo, a 33-year-old Glenolden native, demanded that followers fast Wednesday through Friday, attend one-hour morning prayer sessions five days a week and evening prayer services three times weekly, they said.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jingduan Yang's mother wants him to shut up. Stop talking, she tells him in her phone calls from China. Her youngest son, a Thomas Jefferson University Hospital psychiatrist, is only getting his big sister in more trouble. "She's in again and it's all because of you," Yang said his 79-year-old mother, Sun Yixia, told him. "Don't say anything. Be quiet. " But Yang refuses. The 40-year-old native of Hefei, in China's Anhui Province, wants anyone who will listen to know that his sister, Jingfang Yang, is imprisoned in China because of her belief in the spiritual meditation practice of Falun Gong.
NEWS
May 21, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her devotees believe she is the Hindu goddess of knowledge: a reincarnation of Divine Mother Saraswati, consort of Brahma. But officials at Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wynnewood say Hindus have no business using their Christian campus to promote their beliefs. Yesterday, the seminary canceled tonight's scheduled lecture by Indian holy woman Sri Karunamayi, who is in her late 30s and is nearing the end of a 13-city U.S. tour that began April 5 in Dallas. "It is our understanding that this woman is representing Hinduism," said Scott Rodin, vice president for advancement at the 460-student seminary.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last Sunday morning, Alexander Menn, one of the most beloved Russian Orthodox priests in the Soviet Union, set out on his accustomed route to church. It was 6:30 a.m. The stocky, handsome, gray-bearded priest left his wooden house, set in a grove of birch and pine, and headed for the train station of this country town. His route took him through a 300-yard stretch of forest cloaked in early morning gloom. The train would take him 15 miles to the village of Novaya Deryevnya, where he was a fabled preacher during the long years of Soviet religious oppression.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Brandt Berg, leader of the embattled Children of God religious sect, apparently has died the way he lived: shrouded in mystery. His followers say they don't know where or exactly when he died, or under what circumstances. But spokesmen for the sect in the United States and Europe say Berg's wife notified them Tuesday - in a letter from an unknown location - that their 75-year-old leader, in hiding since the early 1970s, had died. If Berg is gone (international police authorities are expressing doubts)
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Imam Warith Deen Mohammed, a national leader for African American Muslims who preaches personal responsibility and brotherhood between the races, urged his followers yesterday to practice love in the family and in government. "No one can become a believer or have faith until he practices love between his brothers and sisters," he told about 400 African American Muslims who gathered in the auditorium of Willingboro High School. The event was sponsored by eight New Jersey masjids, or congregations.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth and Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Death seems to follow Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman like a distant echo - there often seems to be a connection to his words, but it's never quite clear. There was the 1981 assassination of Egyptian President Anwar el-Sadat, which reportedly came after the blind Muslim cleric issued a decree denouncing Sadat's negotiations with Israel. There was the 1990 slaying of radical Rabbi Meir Kahane in New York. There was the killing two years ago of a Muslim man in Brooklyn who had clashed with the cleric.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 3, 2016 | By Jeff McLane, STAFF WRITER
Doug, you can do it. You can color outside the lines of the Andy Reid blueprint. Don't do it just to be different or out of hubris. Do it because you analyzed one of the Reid's long-established habits, concluded that it wasn't effective and found a better answer. For example, Reid's offensive play-calling arrangement is cumbersome. When Reid has called plays as head coach, both with the Eagles and Chiefs, he has radioed the call to his offensive coordinator, who has in turn passed it along to the quarterback.
NEWS
July 30, 2016
A 23-year-old woman has been charged with stabbing her brother to death after an argument at their home in Port Richmond on Tuesday, according to police. Naija Greo, of the 3100 block of Agate Street, is accused of slashing her brother, Zoilo Rodriguez-Greo, Tuesday afternoon and fleeing the scene after he stumbled outside bleeding. Police found Rodriguez-Greo lying on the street suffering from stab wounds around 1:20 p.m. He was transported to Temple University Hospital and pronounced dead at 1:55 p.m., police said.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Four iconic Philadelphia radio stations are changing hands in a blockbuster deal announced Wednesday. The repercussions could be strong and likely augur more cuts, suggests a seasoned media insider, for staffers and programming at WMMR-FM (93.3), WMGK-FM (102.9), WBEN-FM (95.7), and WPEN-FM (97.5). Beasley Broadcasting of Naples, Fla., announced its intention to pick up all 21 stations in seven markets owned by Greater Media Inc. in a $240 million transaction that includes $100 million in cash.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Charles Fox, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
During the 39 years the Carlisle Indian Industrial School was in existence, 628 students from the Seneca Nation would walk through its gates. Approximately 50 Seneca visitors from the Cattaragus and Allegany Reservations in western New York came recently to walk in their footsteps. And in a location where American Indian students were once not allowed to express their native traditions, the Seneca visitors came to dance. "Our social dancing is to bring positive energy, good feelings," said Sheldon Sundown who organized the dancers.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
In the animal care world, July 5 is known as the busiest day of the year. The reason? Fireworks. At the sound of the first boom, family pets will tear through screens, break windows, shoot out doors, scale tall fences and race for miles until they are completely disoriented and exhausted. "That one day can be pretty scary," said Laura Garber, manager of behavior and enrichment for the Pennsylvania SPCA. It's not just the larger firework displays but also the occasional neighborhood firework or sidewalk popper that can send pets running, said Garber.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
It isn't every day an NBA franchise is able to introduce the No. 1 draft pick, so Bryan Colangelo took a moment on Friday - as the team officially welcomed Ben Simmons - to acknowledge the man behind the bumpy road that made it possible. "We came in with a lot in front of us to do, but with a lot of tools and resources put in place by my predecessor," Colangelo said. "We were able to draft from multiple positions in this draft and add significant talent to the roster. That's in addition to all the good young pieces already in place.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, STAFF WRITER
On a wet afternoon at Crosswicks Wildlife Sanctuary in Abington Township, Leigh Altadonna walked the muddy trails, searching through binoculars for a breeding pair of wood thrushes, a species in decline, and remembering a childhood day 60 years ago when he saw a robin in the woods behind his Glenside home, carrying mud from a pond to build its nest. He's been a fervent birder ever since. "It doesn't take an exotic bird to get you into this," he said. "For me, it was a robin. " Altadonna, 67, is a benevolent guiding spirit at Crosswicks - Pennsylvania's only National Audubon Society sanctuary - rambling through its 13 acres as knowingly as he once walked the woods of his youth, eyes and ears attuned to the moving tapestry of birds from the forest floor to the tree canopy 100 feet above.
NEWS
June 17, 2016
ISSUE | DEVELOPMENT High-rise within law The Philadelphia Department of Licenses and Inspections is not considering allowing a developer, PMC Property Group, to back out of a "deal" to provide affordable housing in return for a zoning "favor" from the city that added five stories to the apartment building on the Delaware waterfront ("Low road for high-rise," Monday). L&I's role is to apply the law. There is no deal; there is no favor. PMC's zoning permit provides for a "zoning bonus" authorizing extra stories on its building.
SPORTS
May 20, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, STAFF WRITER
BALTIMORE - When a really good horse wins the Kentucky Derby, that horse rarely loses the Preakness. See American Pharoah, California Chrome, Big Brown and Smarty Jones, as examples this century. I wasn't ready to put Nyquist in their class before the Derby. I am now. If you think Exaggerator was eventually going to pass Nyquist, think again. If you kept watching past the wire, you noticed the final margin actually increased as the horses galloped to the first turn. Exaggerator's jockey, Kent Desormeaux, said he lost momentum on his late runner heading into the far turn.
NEWS
May 19, 2016
IF LAWMAKERS in Harrisburg want to look for a place with effective and enforced election laws, they do not need to look far. They can look to Philadelphia. Yes, Philadelphia. The city has a far tougher election law than the state of Pennsylvania. For one thing, the city has limits on campaign giving. The state has none. For another, we have the Board of Ethics to enforce the law. It tracks down mistakes and misdeeds in the filing or spending of campaign money - and has the power to levy thousands of dollars in fines.
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