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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Nicole Laporte, New York Times News Service
LOS ANGELES - "Some people say: 'Maude Apatow is my spirit animal.' I get that a lot," Maude Apatow said. "They tweet it to me. " Over a coconut milk smoothie at a trendy vegan restaurant in Los Angeles, Maude was describing the rather intense fascination she has inspired on Twitter, where she has more than 62,000 followers. That may not compare to Lady Gaga's total, but considering she is a 14-year-old just out of braces, not a celebrity and not someone who has done anything outrageous on YouTube, it's an impressive fan base.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Wise thinks about Phil Bengtson. "Most people never heard of us, Phil Bengtson and me," he says, "because there is no slot in the record books for what you might call famous followers. " Phil Bengtson, you may not remember, was coach of the Green Bay Packers for three years in the late '60s and early '70s. All he had to do was follow the legendary Vince Lombardi, whose teams won league championships in each of the three years before Bengtson's takeover. Bengtson never made the playoffs during his three years as head coach.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
ISEE THE leftists are screaming about Christine O'Donnell's "shady past. " Maybe they should look into Obama's past, and the czars he has around him. Ayres. Holdren. Holder. Jennings. Lloyd. Dunn. Jarrett. Sunstein. Nice Marxists, all of them. Pat Dougherty Philadelphia
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
Three former Church of Our First Love members say church leader Anthony Marcolongo has an unquenchable desire to control the lives - and minds - of his followers. The three, who spoke on condition that they not be named, say Marcolongo, who started his church in 1983, made rigorous demands on his group. Marcolongo, a 33-year-old Glenolden native, demanded that followers fast Wednesday through Friday, attend one-hour morning prayer sessions five days a week and evening prayer services three times weekly, they said.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jingduan Yang's mother wants him to shut up. Stop talking, she tells him in her phone calls from China. Her youngest son, a Thomas Jefferson University Hospital psychiatrist, is only getting his big sister in more trouble. "She's in again and it's all because of you," Yang said his 79-year-old mother, Sun Yixia, told him. "Don't say anything. Be quiet. " But Yang refuses. The 40-year-old native of Hefei, in China's Anhui Province, wants anyone who will listen to know that his sister, Jingfang Yang, is imprisoned in China because of her belief in the spiritual meditation practice of Falun Gong.
NEWS
May 21, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her devotees believe she is the Hindu goddess of knowledge: a reincarnation of Divine Mother Saraswati, consort of Brahma. But officials at Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wynnewood say Hindus have no business using their Christian campus to promote their beliefs. Yesterday, the seminary canceled tonight's scheduled lecture by Indian holy woman Sri Karunamayi, who is in her late 30s and is nearing the end of a 13-city U.S. tour that began April 5 in Dallas. "It is our understanding that this woman is representing Hinduism," said Scott Rodin, vice president for advancement at the 460-student seminary.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last Sunday morning, Alexander Menn, one of the most beloved Russian Orthodox priests in the Soviet Union, set out on his accustomed route to church. It was 6:30 a.m. The stocky, handsome, gray-bearded priest left his wooden house, set in a grove of birch and pine, and headed for the train station of this country town. His route took him through a 300-yard stretch of forest cloaked in early morning gloom. The train would take him 15 miles to the village of Novaya Deryevnya, where he was a fabled preacher during the long years of Soviet religious oppression.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Brandt Berg, leader of the embattled Children of God religious sect, apparently has died the way he lived: shrouded in mystery. His followers say they don't know where or exactly when he died, or under what circumstances. But spokesmen for the sect in the United States and Europe say Berg's wife notified them Tuesday - in a letter from an unknown location - that their 75-year-old leader, in hiding since the early 1970s, had died. If Berg is gone (international police authorities are expressing doubts)
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Imam Warith Deen Mohammed, a national leader for African American Muslims who preaches personal responsibility and brotherhood between the races, urged his followers yesterday to practice love in the family and in government. "No one can become a believer or have faith until he practices love between his brothers and sisters," he told about 400 African American Muslims who gathered in the auditorium of Willingboro High School. The event was sponsored by eight New Jersey masjids, or congregations.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth and Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Death seems to follow Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman like a distant echo - there often seems to be a connection to his words, but it's never quite clear. There was the 1981 assassination of Egyptian President Anwar el-Sadat, which reportedly came after the blind Muslim cleric issued a decree denouncing Sadat's negotiations with Israel. There was the 1990 slaying of radical Rabbi Meir Kahane in New York. There was the killing two years ago of a Muslim man in Brooklyn who had clashed with the cleric.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 21, 2015 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Columnist
IMAGINE BUILDING your dream home, living in it for a year and then having to knock it down and rebuild it. Now imagine doing that every single year. Welcome to the life of a special-teams coach. "That's how it works in our area," said the Eagles' Dave Fipp. "You've got to build from the ground up every year. "The thing that happens with special teams is the back end of the roster changes the most usually. But to me, that's fun. It resets and you've got to start over from scratch every year.
SPORTS
August 13, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
ON YESTERDAY'S annual preseason Ivy League coaches conference call, Al Bagnoli said the mid-October Penn-Columbia game in New York "will certainly . . . have a weird dynamic to it. " That's one way of pointing out the obvious. Bagnoli was Penn football for the last 23 seasons, a run that included nine titles. He stepped down after last season, which enabled Ray Priore to finally step in. The same Priore who's been at Penn since 1987, coaching linebackers, defensive ends, special teams and defensive backs.
NEWS
July 29, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE CADET FROM Northeast Philly left at dawn yesterday in her freshly starched uniform, nervous and ready for something new, but the person she'd always imagined kissing goodbye before that journey began wasn't there to see her go. Maria Gill was a Catholic school teacher when she fell for Philadelphia firefighter Timothy Gill. It was the uniform, she said. When he'd come home after a shift, Maria would listen to Tim's stories while she graded papers or prepared lesson plans, and she was drawn in by his tales of firehouse bonds, the big cookouts between the runs and those days when they'd beat back the flames and feel blessed to be alive.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
In its latest response to the deadly May 12 Amtrak wreck at Frankford Junction in Philadelphia, the Federal Railroad Administration urged passenger railroads to better control train speed approaching tight curves and bridges. The safety advisory on Tuesday recommended that railroads identify locations where the speed limit drops by more than 20 m.p.h. entering the curve or bridge. Railroads should install automatic-braking circuitry at those locations to slow trains if the engineer doesn't, the FRA said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2015 | By Layla A. Jones, PHILLY.COM
Wearing a blue-and-purple tie-dye crop top that exposes her hot-pink bra paired with rolled-up jeans shorts and massive platform work boots, Anhia Santana doesn't seem . . . well, even as young as she is, she doesn't like to reveal her age. "I feel like it ruins my brand," said Santana, better known as the visual artist Distortedd. Her "brand" is a collection of captivatingly grotesque illustrations and animations with psychedelic swirls, gross-out oozes, and bouncing body parts that she admits sometimes scare people away.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In this age of the ubiquitous cellphone camera, rarely a week passes without the release of yet another video showing police officers responding inappropriately to volatile situations. Currently making the rounds on the Internet and TV is footage showing a policeman, who had responded to a call about a fight at a pool party, throwing a teenage girl in a bikini to the ground and drawing his gun when witnesses threaten to intercede. The McKinney, Texas, officer was later placed on administrative leave pending an investigation.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When it comes to nuclear negotiations with Iran, which are nearing a June 30 deadline, those who want a solid deal should be saying Vive la France! The French are taking the toughest stand of any of the six countries (known as the P5+1) that are negotiating with Tehran. Paris insists that any accord must permit continuing inspections of all Iranian nuclear installations, including military sites. This demand has been put forward by the entire P5+1 (the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council plus Germany)
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
It was a Philadelphia underdog story: Irish American son of a firefighter from the old neighborhood, dismissed at first, captures Democratic nomination for mayor. To some Democrats, former City Councilman Jim Kenney's landslide win also echoes nationally as the latest example of a progressive big-city tide - on the order of the 2013 victories of Bill de Blasio in New York and union laborer Marty Walsh in Boston. These mayors and others were elected by broad, cross-racial coalitions, on promises to address the economic frustrations of workers and to end racial disparities in law enforcement.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A chubby, happy harbor seal has been spotted in the Rancocas Creek, apparently lured by herring, says a wildlife expert who assists stranded and displaced marine animals. "It's not unusual for the seals to follow the herring in the spring and to not know how far upstream they are going," said Bob Schoelkopf founder of the Marine Mammal Stranding Center in Brigantine, N.J. "As long as they find food, they're happy. When they run out of food, they go back down" into Delaware Bay and out into the ocean.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2015 | By Roberta Sandler, For The Inquirer
GREENWOOD, Miss. - The 2011 film version of Kathryn Stockett's bestseller, The Help , was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture, which cheerfully prompted Greenwood to create a new tourist attraction: The Help Tour. This lovely little Mississippi Delta city (pop. 16,000) has long been wrapped in blues heritage and Civil Rights history. Markers for both the Mississippi Blues Trail and the Mississippi Freedom Trail dot the landscape. Now, Greenwood is drawing on its cinematic connections, as well, by pointing visitors on self-guided driving tours of the local sites where The Help was filmed.
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