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Food Allergies

ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice. On missing your child's birth because of a prior social commitment: I am an aunt to two children whose mother died giving birth to the second child 13 years ago. It still happens. You need to be there. On unsolicited opinions and advice on medical conditions: My daughter is 7, and from age 3 has had asthma triggered by tree-pollen allergies, as well as an egg allergy we must carry an EpiPen for. She is also allergic to any furry and feathered pets, dust, and weeds, and can get asthmatic in other people's houses from pet hair/dander.
NEWS
December 27, 2005 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The doctors and scientists streaming into the booth at the allergists' convention were amazed at what the middle-schoolers had wrought. The concept captivated them. It was a handheld scanner that could instantly translate confusing food labels to reveal potentially dangerous ingredients. For the 11 million Americans with sometimes lethal food allergies, it could prevent injury or even death. That it was invented by a bunch of kids barely into their teens only fueled the fascination last month for the annual meeting of the American College of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology.
NEWS
March 30, 2009 | By Gloria Hochman FOR THE INQUIRER
Prominently displayed in every classroom in the House at Pooh Corner in Germantown is this chart: Ben: peanuts Audrey: blueberries and strawberries Marley: squash Mateo: fava beans Tahir: seafood Elie, Lola, Raj, Solveig, Zuri: dairy Elise: milk, soy Sarah: eggs These are the reported food allergies of 12 out of 55 Pooh preschoolers. "This is a relatively new phenomenon," says Teri DiCesare, owner and director of Child's Conceptions Day Care Center, which operates Pooh.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1991 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Annette Girsh started getting migraine headaches in the 1970s, most doctors would have advised a painkiller and an easy chair. In her case, though, her doctor was also her husband. And her migraines came after munching on chocolate while helping him research one of his many scholarly papers. So, once he determined she was allergic to chocolate, she had a certain leverage. "It was just like Mrs. Gerber asking her husband to mash the baby's peas," says her husband, Leonard S. Girsh, a Huntingdon Valley allergist and immunologist.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
By Jessica Braun I realized that I had lost control of my life when I couldn't eat the lasagna. I started dieting around ninth grade. I have been in The Zone, eaten a Big Mac sans bun, and squeezed many lemons into my magical maple syrup-cayenne pepper elixir. I can recite the foods most beneficial to my blood type (liver, mutton, beet leaves) and can say with certainty that saving all your Weight Watcher points for a six-pack of Miller Light (18 points) instead of food never ends well.
NEWS
December 2, 2007 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What would the season of turkey, jingle, dreidel and Kwanzaa be without its signature foods? No gobble gobble. No gingerbread cookies. No latkes. No sweet-potato pie. The holiday police would have grounds for an arrest. But some families would have no choice but to surrender. When the children have food allergies, holidays that are heavily defined by communal dining and sweet confections create a real challenge. Parents striving to maintain the spirit of the holidays - safely - have a place to turn thanks to Lynda Mitchell, of Plumstead.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania House unanimously passed a bill this week extending insurance coverage of amino-acid-based liquid nutrition formulas to children with severe food allergies. The sponsor, Rep. Daniel Truitt (R., Chester), said he hoped for Senate passage in the fall. An estimated 450 infants and children in Pennsylvania cannot eat conventional foods because of food-protein allergies. They require the elemental liquid formulas, which must be prescribed by a physician and cost about $5,000 a year.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
Really care about giving out good-for-them goodies this go-round? Our ranking of best to worst. 1 Toys, stickers. They last longer than candy. Ideal for trick-or-treaters with weight issues or food allergies. 2 Prepackaged fruits and veggies. Squeeze pouches of applesauce and such, too. 3 Salty snacks. Utz makes cute snack bags of bat- and Jack-o-lantern-shaped pretzels. 4 Fun-size candies. The smaller the better. Our pros especially like York Peppermint Patties, but give in to tolerate Reese's PB Cups.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
FOOD ALLERGIES Is someone in your family allergic to milk? Don't automatically trust products labeled "non-dairy," warn Johns Hopkins University allergy specialists. They say that such foods may not be completely milk-free. Three children with cow's-milk hypersensitivity developed acute allergic reactions after eating tofu- and rice-based frozen deserts, made in dairy processing plants and contaminated with milk, and one child reacted to a hot dog, which contained hydrolized sodium caseinate - a milk derivative not listed on the label.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Jean Kintisch of Wayne, Halloween can be a scary time of year - and not in an exciting, haunted-house kind of way. That's because her youngest daughter has nut allergies that make trick-or-treating a potentially life-threatening activity. This year, though, Kintisch may feel a little less frightened, thanks to a campaign called the Teal Pumpkin Project that invites people to display a teal-painted pumpkin or a printable flier to notify trick-or-treaters that nonfood treats such as stickers or crayons are available.
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