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Food Allergies

NEWS
August 12, 1993 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For many new mothers, with the decision to return to the workplace comes another choice to be made: to continue to breast-feed their babies, or to switch to formula. But that second decision need not be made, according to a certified lactation consultant. Women can return to work and still do all that they must to breast-feed. All it takes is an understanding boss, one willing to provide them the time and space to express breast milk during working hours. At an open house last week to mark World Breast-feeding Week, consultant Diane DiSandro said breast-feeding and the workplace has become an often- raised issue.
FOOD
November 12, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. My girls cannot tolerate gluten in their diets. Encyclopedias don't say whether there is gluten in certain grains such as semolina, soy, millet, triticale, wheat germ, etc. I've read that pastry flour lacks gluten. Is this true? Elaine Cook W. Bloomfield, Mich. A. You asked many questions about the gluten content of various flours in your letter, which I had to shorten. Basically, there's a certain amount of gluten in all flour, wheat containing the most. Pastry flour has some gluten, but not as much as bread flour.
NEWS
March 9, 2008
"Most women aren't too heavy; they're just too short," cardiac rehabilitation nurse Joyce Haag joked during a heart-healthy nutrition workshop at My Girlfriend's Kitchen, a meal-assembly business in Turnersville. As about 30 women munched on Madcap Oatmeal Coconut Bars and Meatballs with Zesty Orange Sauce, Haag taught them how to calculate their body mass index, scrutinize food labels, and make low-fat choices. Lourdes Health System sponsored the event as part of its February "Go Red for Women" campaign to raise awareness about their number-one killer: heart disease.
SPORTS
August 10, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Eat a piece of bread and feel bad on your run the next day? If you're blaming gluten, you're not the only one - and you may be pointing the finger in the wrong direction. In a study recently published in the International Journal of Sports Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism, 910 athletes, including 18 world champion and/or Olympic medalists, were surveyed about their eating habits. Forty-one percent follow a gluten-free diet 50 percent to 100 percent of the time. Fifty-seven percent self-diagnosed a gluten sensitivity.
FOOD
February 19, 1995 | By Jim Burns, FOR THE INQUIRER
What's all this about yeast-free bread? In the last couple of months, I've seen three or four brands in natural- food markets with colorful "Yeast Free" stickers. If there's no yeast in the bread, how does it rise and become a minor glory of the civilized world? I had more than just a technical interest, and was thinking of those who suffer side-effects from baker's yeast. Ah, to taste a good crust of bread again would be worth its weight in - desem? As I found out, desem, a natural "starter," is at the heart of this new bread revolution.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shelly Fisher's world is dominated by the unfashionable. Not people, but the illnesses and other medical conditions that plague them. Diabetes, heart disease, peanut allergies. There's nothing stylish about any of it. Except, perhaps, for the contributions the Villanova mother of three has made over the last nine years on her way to building an internationally known company. Hope Paige Designs L.L.C., operating out of cluttered third-floor space in a West Conshohocken office building, creates medical-identification bracelets with a twofold purpose: to save lives and be chic (or cool, depending on the targeted age group)
FOOD
January 5, 2006 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Any food-trend watcher worth her salt has got to be a little like Janus, the double-faced Roman god: You have to look forward and you have to look back. In 2005, small got big (think mini-cupcakes and pee-wee eggplant), pomegranates and blueberries got put on a pedestal (the first six months saw the introduction of a dozen new blueberry-juice products alone), and regional foods came into their own. These and several other trends cited in last year's list are now moving steadily, some aggressively, into the mainstream.
FOOD
June 18, 1986 | By KAREN KENNEY, Los Angeles Daily News
Diet books are a staple in the publishing trade. They rise each year like a hungry Phoenix from the ashes of diet fads to become best-sellers, despite the protests of nutrition experts who say most of these books are thin on fact and fat on fiction. The current serving of sizzling diet books includes "Fit for Life," "Dr. Berger's Immune Power Diet," "The Rice Diet Report" and "The Rotation Diet. " All made the New York Times list of best sellers this year, but doctors and dietitians are having a hard time digesting what the public is swallowing whole.
NEWS
October 23, 2007
Picky eaters That was quite a diatribe about Jessica Seinfeld's new book, Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids to Eat Good Food ("Mrs. Seinfeld's recipe to raise picky eaters," Oct. 17). Why attack someone who is providing a nutritionist- and physician-endorsed book of recipes to assist some (dare I say most?) mothers with a difficult area of child rearing? Seinfeld is simply making the foods that most children already eat more nutritious by adding a serving of healthful ingredients to the mix. As the mother of two picky eaters (ages 5 and 2)
NEWS
June 13, 2007 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist For decades, a quiet controversy has been brewing across America. The dispute reveals a troublesome double standard concerning mothers breast-feeding in public. We're uncomfortable about it. Sure, sure, the act is sweet and natural - but in public? Apparently, this is a Jekyll and Hyde culture that wants bare breasts on the screen, but not in the mall. We are now living in the 21st century (I hear), but far too many Americans are languishing in the distant past.
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