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Food Allergies

FOOD
January 10, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
The meat cases at Sonny D'Angelo's singular butcher shop were half-empty and a bit of a mess one day last week in the languor of postholiday Ninth Street. The lardo was buried under a slab of double-smoked bacon, and some sausage trays lacked for labels, though you could make out the hand-scrawled sign for a pumpkiny pork sausage (with bourbon and walnuts), a feature of one of his claims to fame - the meticulously artisan, labor-intensive, bread-free turducken. Business had been robust before New Year's, he said, with his seven-fishes sausage to make, his exotic game to pitch.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Think of all the things you've touched today - the door handles pulled, the elevator buttons pushed, the railings held, the coins counted. All of them were coated with germs. Afterward, so were your hands. How often - and how thoroughly - did you wash them? In the battle against bugs, we often turn to antibacterial products. But a key ingredient in many of them, triclosan, may have its own problems. Triclosan, a type of chemical known as a chlorinated aromatic compound, has been linked with health issues, including hormone disruption.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2012 | Jeff Gelles
To restaurateur Bryon Phillips, the OpenTable online-reservation system is so essential that he can barely imagine doing without it. About half the patrons at Zama, the Japanese restaurant and sushi bar he manages on 19th Street, book their tables online. And almost all arrive via OpenTable, which over the last decade has made itself almost as attractive to diners as it is to restaurateurs — thanks to its convenience for finding a perfect place to eat, and to its popular frequent-diners program.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I CALLED Pittsburgh pediatrician Lidia Turzai after the state House of Representatives canceled the vote on a new cigarette tax for Philly. "The office is now closed," went the recorded message for Dr. Turzai's large Pittsburgh practice. "If this is an emergency, hang up and call 9-1-1. " Hell, yeah, it was an emergency, except the cops wouldn't be of any help. Because it would be illegal for them to knock sense into the heads of Dr. Turzai's husband, state House Majority Leader Michael Turzai, and House Speaker Sam Smith.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shelly Fisher's world is dominated by the unfashionable. Not people, but the illnesses and other medical conditions that plague them. Diabetes, heart disease, peanut allergies. There's nothing stylish about any of it. Except, perhaps, for the contributions the Villanova mother of three has made over the last nine years on her way to building an internationally known company. Hope Paige Designs L.L.C., operating out of cluttered third-floor space in a West Conshohocken office building, creates medical-identification bracelets with a twofold purpose: to save lives and be chic (or cool, depending on the targeted age group)
NEWS
October 23, 2007
Picky eaters That was quite a diatribe about Jessica Seinfeld's new book, Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids to Eat Good Food ("Mrs. Seinfeld's recipe to raise picky eaters," Oct. 17). Why attack someone who is providing a nutritionist- and physician-endorsed book of recipes to assist some (dare I say most?) mothers with a difficult area of child rearing? Seinfeld is simply making the foods that most children already eat more nutritious by adding a serving of healthful ingredients to the mix. As the mother of two picky eaters (ages 5 and 2)
NEWS
June 13, 2007 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist For decades, a quiet controversy has been brewing across America. The dispute reveals a troublesome double standard concerning mothers breast-feeding in public. We're uncomfortable about it. Sure, sure, the act is sweet and natural - but in public? Apparently, this is a Jekyll and Hyde culture that wants bare breasts on the screen, but not in the mall. We are now living in the 21st century (I hear), but far too many Americans are languishing in the distant past.
FOOD
August 3, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
The Center for Science in the Public Interest grabbed a lot of headlines recently when it slammed cheese-choked, fat-soaked, sour cream-cloaked, guacamole-glopped Mexican food as hazardous to the waist and heart. Another expose - this one involving Chinese restaurants in Philadelphia - didn't get nearly as much attention, probably because it was published in the Veggie News instead of USA Today. "Chinese 'Vegetarian' Food is Not Always Vegetarian!" warned the story by Andy Lefkowitz, president of the Vegetarians of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | by Monte Williams, New York Daily News
She upped her cigarette intake from two to three packs. She snapped at colleagues for micro-offenses. Her food allergies worsened. Kathleen, a divorced real-estate manager and appraiser, felt beat, licked and pummeled - stressed out to the max. Yet she did nothing about it until two guys at work - a superior and a colleague - took her to lunch. "They told me I was being too aggressive," recalled the 41-year-old Yonkers, N.Y., resident. "They could have had a point. My sarcasm was (at an all-time high)
FOOD
March 8, 1992 | By Edward R. Blonz, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
It's always interesting when scientific studies say good things about foods that we have a passion for - especially when they're foods associated with some degree of guilt. Given this, I'm sure that many will be pleased that today's topic is chocolate. There's little doubt that chocolate would appear near the top of any list of favorite food flavors. This taste, which has been cherished by many cultures throughout history, has a definite ability to please the palate. But chocolate is routinely censured for its hefty burden of saturated fat, its caffeine content, and its reputation for aggravating acne, provoking allergies and causing tooth decay.
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