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Food Allergies

SPORTS
August 10, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Eat a piece of bread and feel bad on your run the next day? If you're blaming gluten, you're not the only one - and you may be pointing the finger in the wrong direction. In a study recently published in the International Journal of Sports Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism, 910 athletes, including 18 world champion and/or Olympic medalists, were surveyed about their eating habits. Forty-one percent follow a gluten-free diet 50 percent to 100 percent of the time. Fifty-seven percent self-diagnosed a gluten sensitivity.
NEWS
March 9, 2008
"Most women aren't too heavy; they're just too short," cardiac rehabilitation nurse Joyce Haag joked during a heart-healthy nutrition workshop at My Girlfriend's Kitchen, a meal-assembly business in Turnersville. As about 30 women munched on Madcap Oatmeal Coconut Bars and Meatballs with Zesty Orange Sauce, Haag taught them how to calculate their body mass index, scrutinize food labels, and make low-fat choices. Lourdes Health System sponsored the event as part of its February "Go Red for Women" campaign to raise awareness about their number-one killer: heart disease.
FOOD
February 19, 1995 | By Jim Burns, FOR THE INQUIRER
What's all this about yeast-free bread? In the last couple of months, I've seen three or four brands in natural- food markets with colorful "Yeast Free" stickers. If there's no yeast in the bread, how does it rise and become a minor glory of the civilized world? I had more than just a technical interest, and was thinking of those who suffer side-effects from baker's yeast. Ah, to taste a good crust of bread again would be worth its weight in - desem? As I found out, desem, a natural "starter," is at the heart of this new bread revolution.
FOOD
January 10, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
The meat cases at Sonny D'Angelo's singular butcher shop were half-empty and a bit of a mess one day last week in the languor of postholiday Ninth Street. The lardo was buried under a slab of double-smoked bacon, and some sausage trays lacked for labels, though you could make out the hand-scrawled sign for a pumpkiny pork sausage (with bourbon and walnuts), a feature of one of his claims to fame - the meticulously artisan, labor-intensive, bread-free turducken. Business had been robust before New Year's, he said, with his seven-fishes sausage to make, his exotic game to pitch.
FOOD
January 5, 2006 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Any food-trend watcher worth her salt has got to be a little like Janus, the double-faced Roman god: You have to look forward and you have to look back. In 2005, small got big (think mini-cupcakes and pee-wee eggplant), pomegranates and blueberries got put on a pedestal (the first six months saw the introduction of a dozen new blueberry-juice products alone), and regional foods came into their own. These and several other trends cited in last year's list are now moving steadily, some aggressively, into the mainstream.
FOOD
June 18, 1986 | By KAREN KENNEY, Los Angeles Daily News
Diet books are a staple in the publishing trade. They rise each year like a hungry Phoenix from the ashes of diet fads to become best-sellers, despite the protests of nutrition experts who say most of these books are thin on fact and fat on fiction. The current serving of sizzling diet books includes "Fit for Life," "Dr. Berger's Immune Power Diet," "The Rice Diet Report" and "The Rotation Diet. " All made the New York Times list of best sellers this year, but doctors and dietitians are having a hard time digesting what the public is swallowing whole.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
To their young charges, they're the slightly older arbiters of fun in the summer. The camp counselor is the hip role model who is cool to look up to. But the young people whose job it is to take care of campers during the summer say their jobs are about more than supervising the basketball game or taking the easy path to summer employment. Their role has increasing responsibility and requires training that has become more extensive and varied. "We see the kid whose parents are going through a divorce, or the kid coming in the same clothes day after day. Sometimes we see pain and suffering that they may be going through at home," said Josh Watters, 24, a counselor at the Diamond Ridge day camp in Jamison.
NEWS
October 23, 2007
Picky eaters That was quite a diatribe about Jessica Seinfeld's new book, Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids to Eat Good Food ("Mrs. Seinfeld's recipe to raise picky eaters," Oct. 17). Why attack someone who is providing a nutritionist- and physician-endorsed book of recipes to assist some (dare I say most?) mothers with a difficult area of child rearing? Seinfeld is simply making the foods that most children already eat more nutritious by adding a serving of healthful ingredients to the mix. As the mother of two picky eaters (ages 5 and 2)
NEWS
June 13, 2007 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist For decades, a quiet controversy has been brewing across America. The dispute reveals a troublesome double standard concerning mothers breast-feeding in public. We're uncomfortable about it. Sure, sure, the act is sweet and natural - but in public? Apparently, this is a Jekyll and Hyde culture that wants bare breasts on the screen, but not in the mall. We are now living in the 21st century (I hear), but far too many Americans are languishing in the distant past.
FOOD
August 3, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
The Center for Science in the Public Interest grabbed a lot of headlines recently when it slammed cheese-choked, fat-soaked, sour cream-cloaked, guacamole-glopped Mexican food as hazardous to the waist and heart. Another expose - this one involving Chinese restaurants in Philadelphia - didn't get nearly as much attention, probably because it was published in the Veggie News instead of USA Today. "Chinese 'Vegetarian' Food is Not Always Vegetarian!" warned the story by Andy Lefkowitz, president of the Vegetarians of Philadelphia.
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