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Food Allergies

FOOD
February 19, 1995 | By Jim Burns, FOR THE INQUIRER
What's all this about yeast-free bread? In the last couple of months, I've seen three or four brands in natural- food markets with colorful "Yeast Free" stickers. If there's no yeast in the bread, how does it rise and become a minor glory of the civilized world? I had more than just a technical interest, and was thinking of those who suffer side-effects from baker's yeast. Ah, to taste a good crust of bread again would be worth its weight in - desem? As I found out, desem, a natural "starter," is at the heart of this new bread revolution.
FOOD
January 5, 2006 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Any food-trend watcher worth her salt has got to be a little like Janus, the double-faced Roman god: You have to look forward and you have to look back. In 2005, small got big (think mini-cupcakes and pee-wee eggplant), pomegranates and blueberries got put on a pedestal (the first six months saw the introduction of a dozen new blueberry-juice products alone), and regional foods came into their own. These and several other trends cited in last year's list are now moving steadily, some aggressively, into the mainstream.
FOOD
June 18, 1986 | By KAREN KENNEY, Los Angeles Daily News
Diet books are a staple in the publishing trade. They rise each year like a hungry Phoenix from the ashes of diet fads to become best-sellers, despite the protests of nutrition experts who say most of these books are thin on fact and fat on fiction. The current serving of sizzling diet books includes "Fit for Life," "Dr. Berger's Immune Power Diet," "The Rice Diet Report" and "The Rotation Diet. " All made the New York Times list of best sellers this year, but doctors and dietitians are having a hard time digesting what the public is swallowing whole.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
To their young charges, they're the slightly older arbiters of fun in the summer. The camp counselor is the hip role model who is cool to look up to. But the young people whose job it is to take care of campers during the summer say their jobs are about more than supervising the basketball game or taking the easy path to summer employment. Their role has increasing responsibility and requires training that has become more extensive and varied. "We see the kid whose parents are going through a divorce, or the kid coming in the same clothes day after day. Sometimes we see pain and suffering that they may be going through at home," said Josh Watters, 24, a counselor at the Diamond Ridge day camp in Jamison.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
A NUTRITIONIST as well as a food-allergy sufferer, Allison Lubert has had a big impact on "restrictive" eating around Broad and South for the past four years, since the first Sweet Freedom Bakery opened there, with delicacies free of gluten, eggs, dairy, soy, corn, peanuts and refined sugar. Now, after opening additional locations in Collingswood and Bryn Mawr, she'll share her innovative recipes in Baking You Happy: Gluten-Free Recipes from Sweet Freedom Bakery , coming this month from Peter Pauper Press . Here are highlights from my phone chat with her. Q: For a long time, it seemed you felt proprietary about the recipes you'd developed.
NEWS
February 21, 2012
WITH a 25 percent poverty rate ($23,050 or below for a family of four) - up from 18.5 percent in 2000 - Philadelphia is the country's biggest poor city. Seventy percent of its children have public health-insurance coverage. Yet, since the summer, the Department of Public Welfare has removed 25,000 city children from the medical assistance rolls, kids whose family incomes are believed to still fall within the qualifying guidelines. For these now-uninsured children - and every other child who attends the city public schools - the district's layoff of 47 school nurses means that the children's health and educational prospects have taken a step backward.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The disease is new and, so far, incurable. It is increasingly common and can occur at any age. It typically involves an allergic reaction to foods - in severe cases, all foods - and can turn the pleasurable act of eating into a torment of swallowing problems, pain, vomiting, and choking. If this is the first time you've heard of eosinophilic esophagitis (ee-oh-sin-oh-FILL-ic es-offa-JI-tis), it won't be the last. Add "EoE" to the growing list of ways in which the immune system can go horribly haywire for no apparent reason.
NEWS
October 23, 2007
Picky eaters That was quite a diatribe about Jessica Seinfeld's new book, Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids to Eat Good Food ("Mrs. Seinfeld's recipe to raise picky eaters," Oct. 17). Why attack someone who is providing a nutritionist- and physician-endorsed book of recipes to assist some (dare I say most?) mothers with a difficult area of child rearing? Seinfeld is simply making the foods that most children already eat more nutritious by adding a serving of healthful ingredients to the mix. As the mother of two picky eaters (ages 5 and 2)
NEWS
June 13, 2007 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist For decades, a quiet controversy has been brewing across America. The dispute reveals a troublesome double standard concerning mothers breast-feeding in public. We're uncomfortable about it. Sure, sure, the act is sweet and natural - but in public? Apparently, this is a Jekyll and Hyde culture that wants bare breasts on the screen, but not in the mall. We are now living in the 21st century (I hear), but far too many Americans are languishing in the distant past.
FOOD
August 3, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
The Center for Science in the Public Interest grabbed a lot of headlines recently when it slammed cheese-choked, fat-soaked, sour cream-cloaked, guacamole-glopped Mexican food as hazardous to the waist and heart. Another expose - this one involving Chinese restaurants in Philadelphia - didn't get nearly as much attention, probably because it was published in the Veggie News instead of USA Today. "Chinese 'Vegetarian' Food is Not Always Vegetarian!" warned the story by Andy Lefkowitz, president of the Vegetarians of Philadelphia.
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