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Food Allergies

FOOD
January 10, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
The meat cases at Sonny D'Angelo's singular butcher shop were half-empty and a bit of a mess one day last week in the languor of postholiday Ninth Street. The lardo was buried under a slab of double-smoked bacon, and some sausage trays lacked for labels, though you could make out the hand-scrawled sign for a pumpkiny pork sausage (with bourbon and walnuts), a feature of one of his claims to fame - the meticulously artisan, labor-intensive, bread-free turducken. Business had been robust before New Year's, he said, with his seven-fishes sausage to make, his exotic game to pitch.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shelly Fisher's world is dominated by the unfashionable. Not people, but the illnesses and other medical conditions that plague them. Diabetes, heart disease, peanut allergies. There's nothing stylish about any of it. Except, perhaps, for the contributions the Villanova mother of three has made over the last nine years on her way to building an internationally known company. Hope Paige Designs L.L.C., operating out of cluttered third-floor space in a West Conshohocken office building, creates medical-identification bracelets with a twofold purpose: to save lives and be chic (or cool, depending on the targeted age group)
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The disease is new and, so far, incurable. It is increasingly common and can occur at any age. It typically involves an allergic reaction to foods - in severe cases, all foods - and can turn the pleasurable act of eating into a torment of swallowing problems, pain, vomiting, and choking. If this is the first time you've heard of eosinophilic esophagitis (ee-oh-sin-oh-FILL-ic es-offa-JI-tis), it won't be the last. Add "EoE" to the growing list of ways in which the immune system can go horribly haywire for no apparent reason.
FOOD
January 5, 2006 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Any food-trend watcher worth her salt has got to be a little like Janus, the double-faced Roman god: You have to look forward and you have to look back. In 2005, small got big (think mini-cupcakes and pee-wee eggplant), pomegranates and blueberries got put on a pedestal (the first six months saw the introduction of a dozen new blueberry-juice products alone), and regional foods came into their own. These and several other trends cited in last year's list are now moving steadily, some aggressively, into the mainstream.
FOOD
June 18, 1986 | By KAREN KENNEY, Los Angeles Daily News
Diet books are a staple in the publishing trade. They rise each year like a hungry Phoenix from the ashes of diet fads to become best-sellers, despite the protests of nutrition experts who say most of these books are thin on fact and fat on fiction. The current serving of sizzling diet books includes "Fit for Life," "Dr. Berger's Immune Power Diet," "The Rice Diet Report" and "The Rotation Diet. " All made the New York Times list of best sellers this year, but doctors and dietitians are having a hard time digesting what the public is swallowing whole.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I CALLED Pittsburgh pediatrician Lidia Turzai after the state House of Representatives canceled the vote on a new cigarette tax for Philly. "The office is now closed," went the recorded message for Dr. Turzai's large Pittsburgh practice. "If this is an emergency, hang up and call 9-1-1. " Hell, yeah, it was an emergency, except the cops wouldn't be of any help. Because it would be illegal for them to knock sense into the heads of Dr. Turzai's husband, state House Majority Leader Michael Turzai, and House Speaker Sam Smith.
NEWS
October 23, 2007
Picky eaters That was quite a diatribe about Jessica Seinfeld's new book, Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids to Eat Good Food ("Mrs. Seinfeld's recipe to raise picky eaters," Oct. 17). Why attack someone who is providing a nutritionist- and physician-endorsed book of recipes to assist some (dare I say most?) mothers with a difficult area of child rearing? Seinfeld is simply making the foods that most children already eat more nutritious by adding a serving of healthful ingredients to the mix. As the mother of two picky eaters (ages 5 and 2)
NEWS
June 13, 2007 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist For decades, a quiet controversy has been brewing across America. The dispute reveals a troublesome double standard concerning mothers breast-feeding in public. We're uncomfortable about it. Sure, sure, the act is sweet and natural - but in public? Apparently, this is a Jekyll and Hyde culture that wants bare breasts on the screen, but not in the mall. We are now living in the 21st century (I hear), but far too many Americans are languishing in the distant past.
FOOD
August 3, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
The Center for Science in the Public Interest grabbed a lot of headlines recently when it slammed cheese-choked, fat-soaked, sour cream-cloaked, guacamole-glopped Mexican food as hazardous to the waist and heart. Another expose - this one involving Chinese restaurants in Philadelphia - didn't get nearly as much attention, probably because it was published in the Veggie News instead of USA Today. "Chinese 'Vegetarian' Food is Not Always Vegetarian!" warned the story by Andy Lefkowitz, president of the Vegetarians of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | by Monte Williams, New York Daily News
She upped her cigarette intake from two to three packs. She snapped at colleagues for micro-offenses. Her food allergies worsened. Kathleen, a divorced real-estate manager and appraiser, felt beat, licked and pummeled - stressed out to the max. Yet she did nothing about it until two guys at work - a superior and a colleague - took her to lunch. "They told me I was being too aggressive," recalled the 41-year-old Yonkers, N.Y., resident. "They could have had a point. My sarcasm was (at an all-time high)
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