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Food Allergies

NEWS
October 3, 2014
A NUTRITIONIST as well as a food-allergy sufferer, Allison Lubert has had a big impact on "restrictive" eating around Broad and South for the past four years, since the first Sweet Freedom Bakery opened there, with delicacies free of gluten, eggs, dairy, soy, corn, peanuts and refined sugar. Now, after opening additional locations in Collingswood and Bryn Mawr, she'll share her innovative recipes in Baking You Happy: Gluten-Free Recipes from Sweet Freedom Bakery , coming this month from Peter Pauper Press . Here are highlights from my phone chat with her. Q: For a long time, it seemed you felt proprietary about the recipes you'd developed.
FOOD
January 5, 2006 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Any food-trend watcher worth her salt has got to be a little like Janus, the double-faced Roman god: You have to look forward and you have to look back. In 2005, small got big (think mini-cupcakes and pee-wee eggplant), pomegranates and blueberries got put on a pedestal (the first six months saw the introduction of a dozen new blueberry-juice products alone), and regional foods came into their own. These and several other trends cited in last year's list are now moving steadily, some aggressively, into the mainstream.
FOOD
June 18, 1986 | By KAREN KENNEY, Los Angeles Daily News
Diet books are a staple in the publishing trade. They rise each year like a hungry Phoenix from the ashes of diet fads to become best-sellers, despite the protests of nutrition experts who say most of these books are thin on fact and fat on fiction. The current serving of sizzling diet books includes "Fit for Life," "Dr. Berger's Immune Power Diet," "The Rice Diet Report" and "The Rotation Diet. " All made the New York Times list of best sellers this year, but doctors and dietitians are having a hard time digesting what the public is swallowing whole.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Think of all the things you've touched today - the door handles pulled, the elevator buttons pushed, the railings held, the coins counted. All of them were coated with germs. Afterward, so were your hands. How often - and how thoroughly - did you wash them? In the battle against bugs, we often turn to antibacterial products. But a key ingredient in many of them, triclosan, may have its own problems. Triclosan, a type of chemical known as a chlorinated aromatic compound, has been linked with health issues, including hormone disruption.
NEWS
October 23, 2007
Picky eaters That was quite a diatribe about Jessica Seinfeld's new book, Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids to Eat Good Food ("Mrs. Seinfeld's recipe to raise picky eaters," Oct. 17). Why attack someone who is providing a nutritionist- and physician-endorsed book of recipes to assist some (dare I say most?) mothers with a difficult area of child rearing? Seinfeld is simply making the foods that most children already eat more nutritious by adding a serving of healthful ingredients to the mix. As the mother of two picky eaters (ages 5 and 2)
NEWS
June 13, 2007 | By Claude Lewis
Claude Lewis is a longtime Philadelphia journalist For decades, a quiet controversy has been brewing across America. The dispute reveals a troublesome double standard concerning mothers breast-feeding in public. We're uncomfortable about it. Sure, sure, the act is sweet and natural - but in public? Apparently, this is a Jekyll and Hyde culture that wants bare breasts on the screen, but not in the mall. We are now living in the 21st century (I hear), but far too many Americans are languishing in the distant past.
FOOD
August 3, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
The Center for Science in the Public Interest grabbed a lot of headlines recently when it slammed cheese-choked, fat-soaked, sour cream-cloaked, guacamole-glopped Mexican food as hazardous to the waist and heart. Another expose - this one involving Chinese restaurants in Philadelphia - didn't get nearly as much attention, probably because it was published in the Veggie News instead of USA Today. "Chinese 'Vegetarian' Food is Not Always Vegetarian!" warned the story by Andy Lefkowitz, president of the Vegetarians of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | by Monte Williams, New York Daily News
She upped her cigarette intake from two to three packs. She snapped at colleagues for micro-offenses. Her food allergies worsened. Kathleen, a divorced real-estate manager and appraiser, felt beat, licked and pummeled - stressed out to the max. Yet she did nothing about it until two guys at work - a superior and a colleague - took her to lunch. "They told me I was being too aggressive," recalled the 41-year-old Yonkers, N.Y., resident. "They could have had a point. My sarcasm was (at an all-time high)
FOOD
March 8, 1992 | By Edward R. Blonz, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
It's always interesting when scientific studies say good things about foods that we have a passion for - especially when they're foods associated with some degree of guilt. Given this, I'm sure that many will be pleased that today's topic is chocolate. There's little doubt that chocolate would appear near the top of any list of favorite food flavors. This taste, which has been cherished by many cultures throughout history, has a definite ability to please the palate. But chocolate is routinely censured for its hefty burden of saturated fat, its caffeine content, and its reputation for aggravating acne, provoking allergies and causing tooth decay.
FOOD
June 11, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. Why is pistachio ice cream green? A. Although there's a tiny vivid green kernel inside the pistachio nut, this is not why the ice cream is green. It's artificially colored. In a statement prepared by the Certified Color Manufacturers Association, the use of artificial food colors is defended: "When Americans sit down to Sunday dinner, they expect the peas to be green, strawberry-flavored gelatin to be red, butter to be yellow and pistachio ice cream to be green. "While most people are not aware of it," the statement explains, "many foods would not exist as we know them without added colors.
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