CollectionsFood Allergies
IN THE NEWS

Food Allergies

BUSINESS
November 18, 1991 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Annette Girsh started getting migraine headaches in the 1970s, most doctors would have advised a painkiller and an easy chair. In her case, though, her doctor was also her husband. And her migraines came after munching on chocolate while helping him research one of his many scholarly papers. So, once he determined she was allergic to chocolate, she had a certain leverage. "It was just like Mrs. Gerber asking her husband to mash the baby's peas," says her husband, Leonard S. Girsh, a Huntingdon Valley allergist and immunologist.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Daniel Q. Haney, Associated Press Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Food allergies diagnosed by doctors in a new and controversial medical specialty called environmental medicine appear overwhelmingly to be the result of the power of suggestion rather than true reactions to food, according to a study to be published today. The study found that the type of allergy testing used in environmental medicine does not work, despite its widespread use. The report questions the techniques used by doctors in that specialty, which attributes a wide variety of aches and ills to foods, chemicals and environmental pollutants.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
HEALTH FRAUDS Before you send away for that miracle-cure product, consider this. One of 10 people trying "quack remedies" suffers harmful side-effects, says the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA has compiled a list of the top 10 health frauds. In order, they are: Fraudulent arthritis products, spurious cancer clinics, bogus AIDS cures, instant weight-loss schemes, fraudulent sexual aids, baldness remedies, nutritional schemes, chelation (arterial cleaning) therapy, unproven use of muscle stimulators and needless treatments for nonexistent yeast infections.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Psychology Today and Parents magazines and Inquirer wire services
SEGAL'S COMPLIMENT. Protective, demanding, self-sacrificing, upward- striving mothers have gotten a bad rap, according to a psychologist, who says, "Three cheers for the 'Jewish mother.' " Julius Segal writes in Parents magazine that there is little evidence that such mothers - who obviously aren't all Jewish - "were all that bad for her kids. On the contrary, her instinct for on-the-spot responsiveness to the needs of her little ones, starting from birth, appears to have been profoundly wise.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3
|
|
|
|
|