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Food Distribution

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NEWS
September 16, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Albert C. Clickner, 53, of Hatboro, a foreman at the South Philadelphia food distribution center, died Wednesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. He had cancer for two years. Mr. Clickner worked at the center for 23 years, first for Kansas Beef Industries and then for Quaker Valley Meats. Until he became ill, he was known for putting in long hours and not missing workdays, coworkers said. He was a native of Newberry on Michigan's Upper Peninsula, where he was educated and developed a love of hunting and fishing.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
THIS TOWN HAS activism twisted into its DNA, so we shouldn't be too surprised about the latest protests over a new city policy that will ban mass public feedings of the homeless and hungry in the city's parks, especially on the Ben Franklin Parkway. Almost every day of the week, a variety of organizations and individuals - including a few from Jersey - serve donated food out of the back of vans and trucks. The city, concerned over health and social-service issues, wants the food to be distributed indoors, and to provide safety training to those handing out food.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | By Frank Brown, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Bucks County judge is expected to rule this week on the appeal of a Bristol Borough councilman and a borough employee convicted of stealing food intended for the poor. Councilman Harry Crohe, 45, and August Constantini, 63, contend that a volunteer told them they could take some butter and cheese home as a "tip" for their work - for which they were paid by the borough - at a Sept. 24 food distribution in the borough. After a daylong hearing, Judge Edward G. Biester said June 26 that he would make a decision after reviewing the court transcript and a police videotape.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | By Geoff Mulvihill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For more than a decade, Burlington County officials have dreamed of a massive regional food-distribution center along the Delaware River in Florence and Burlington Townships. Officials had hoped the C. William Haines Distribution Center would bring 2,800 permanent jobs, as one of five "jewels" in a sweeping redevelopment of the Route 130 corridor. Earlier this month, a private developer bought the land that the county had in mind. With that sale, the county's negotiations to buy it ended - but its hopes of redevelopment in the area are still alive.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | By Rebecca Goldsmith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A multimillion dollar, 600-acre food-distribution center in northern Burlington County is not just a pie in the sky. It's a viable way for the county to cash in on the big bucks exchanged for food throughout the region. So said a team of real-estate developers, engineers and economists hopeful of securing their slice of what they said would be a very profitable venture for all involved. County freeholders listened to an in-depth presentation led by Matrix Realty Inc., the Cranbury firm that offered in March to coordinate the study for free.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | By Angela Couloumbis and Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Republicans aren't the only ones carrying clipboards and checklists. As the Republican Party and Philadelphia's host committees continue to script every aspect of next week's GOP convention, groups of activists have countered by mounting an intense organizational effort of their own. They have set up a media headquarters in Center City. They have stocked truckloads of food and water. They have arranged for child care and even rounded up attorneys to represent them should demonstrations end in mass arrests.
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On a 600-acre plot where Burlington County officials had hoped to build a massive food-distribution center, an area construction company is planning the county's largest industrial park. And in the first step toward developing the property, Whitesell Construction Co. of Delran has started building a warehouse to mark one of three entrances to the $250 million proposed complex located in Burlington and Florence Townships. Late last month near Route 130 and Dulty's Lane, Whitesell began construction of the 164,000-square-foot warehouse to house children's products for the Burlington Coat Factory, said Richard Cureton, the development firm's executive vice president.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Late in 1986, Gov. Kean nominated Chuck Zambito, a Haddon Township produce broker, to represent Camden County on the South Jersey Food Distribution Authority - an eight-member agency empaneled by the legislature to construct a large food-distribution and food-processing center. Zambito's appointment and Camden County's stake in the food center quickly got caught in a game of political chicken, with two of South Jersey's most powerful state senators, a Republican and a Democrat, waiting for each other to make the first move.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By Karen Weintraub, Special to The Inquirer
The South Jersey Food Distribution Authority moved into new quarters last Wednesday to be closer to the proposed site of the South Jersey Food Distribution Center on the Burlington Township/Florence Township border. The authority, which had been sharing quarters with the Gloucester County Improvement Authority in Woodbury, had to move out because the improvement authority needed more space. Distribution Authority director Aidan Desmond said he chose the Burlington Township municipal building because of its proximity to the site and because of the reasonable price of the lease.
NEWS
October 18, 1995 | By Deborah Kong, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A federal food distribution program that serves more than 500,000 people in New Jersey has passed a funding hurdle in Congress, but it still appears to be in jeopardy of elimination, according to officials. Last week, Congress approved an agriculture appropriations bill that set aside $166 million for that program, The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), along with two others that distribute food to the needy. But since the amount is less than the $189 million appropriated last year, local officials fear that the U.S. Department of Agriculture will decide to fund only two of the three programs and that TEFAP would be the one to go. The two other programs are a commodities supplemental food project aimed at providing pregnant women, new mothers, infants, young children and the elderly with vital nutrients, and a program that covers food banks and soup kitchens.
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NEWS
February 8, 2013
WHEN U.S. Rep. Bob Brady testified at a City Council hearing Thursday, his message was clear: Get into the game. Brady has proposed that a gaming company should partner with a new nonprofit that would funnel a portion of profits from a casino built on city-owned land into the city's underfunded pension fund and cash-strapped school district. He says that it would mean $115 million over 15 years. The casino operator, Penn National Gaming, is one of six firms vying for the city's remaining casino license.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Outraged area residents have been offering money, praise, and advice to the Delaware County woman whose efforts to voluntarily feed children in her neighborhood have collided with zoning laws. People pledged more than $3,000 to Angela Prattis of Chester Township on Wednesday, which more than covers the $1,000 she must pay for a zoning hearing to continue distributing food from her driveway next year. She's being permitted to distribute food this summer until Aug. 24. A Facebook group of 89 people materialized overnight to "help Angela Prattis ... serve the children.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Outraged area residents have been offering money, praise, and advice to the Delaware County woman whose efforts to voluntarily feed children in her neighborhood have collided with zoning laws. People pledged more than $3,000 to Angela Prattis of Chester Township on Wednesday, which more than covers the $1,000 she must pay for a zoning hearing to continue distributing food from her driveway next year. She's being permitted to distribute food this summer until Aug. 24. A Facebook group of 89 people materialized overnight to "help Angela Prattis ... serve the children.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By Dara McBride and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the ban against serving food to the homeless in city parks goes into effect Friday, the outreach and worship center Chosen 300 Ministries plans to ignore it — and is encouraging others to do the same by offering to pay the first 10 fines received for mass food distribution on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. "I encourage every church, every organization, every individual that has been serving on the Parkway to continue serving on the Parkway, despite this law that is going into effect," Altressa Boatwright, operations manager for Chosen 300, said during a City Council hearing on the ban Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside the Barnes, guests were served lamb chops and smoked salmon cannolis with a lemon aioli sauce along with champagne and red and white wine at the $1,500-a-plate opening-reception dinner. Outside, at 20th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the menu was drastically different. A coalition of homeless-advocacy groups and others protesting the Barnes' move from Merion dined on doughnut holes, salmon dip, bread, apples, bagels, rice, and string beans served on paper plates with plastic utensils.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Marc Lamont Hill, Daily News Columnist
MAYOR NUTTER last week announced a proposal to outlaw outdoor public feedings on city parkland, especially the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, where highly visible feedings take place. According to Nutter, the ban will allow for more sanitary and dignified food distribution to the homeless. As expected, the news sparked a string of protests from antipoverty and anti-Nutter activists, who saw it as a swipe at the poor and a cynical attempt to polish the city's image for tourists and investors.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
THIS TOWN HAS activism twisted into its DNA, so we shouldn't be too surprised about the latest protests over a new city policy that will ban mass public feedings of the homeless and hungry in the city's parks, especially on the Ben Franklin Parkway. Almost every day of the week, a variety of organizations and individuals - including a few from Jersey - serve donated food out of the back of vans and trucks. The city, concerned over health and social-service issues, wants the food to be distributed indoors, and to provide safety training to those handing out food.
NEWS
March 15, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
HUNDREDS OF the city's hungry gather daily on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and at LOVE Park for free food, but those days may be numbered. Mayor Nutter yesterday banned outdoor food distribution in city parks to encourage more indoor, safe and healthy eating. The regulation takes effect in 30 days. "This is aimed at increasing the health, safety, dignity and support of those vulnerable individuals who now gain their daily and often less-than-daily sustenance from well-intentioned groups of individuals and organizations in our city distributing food on our city streets," Nutter said.
NEWS
August 6, 2011 | By Abdi Guled and Katharine Houreld, Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - A World Food Program handout of corn rations to Somalis trying to survive a famine turned deadly Friday after government troops opened fire, killing at least seven, witnesses said. Residents of Mogadishu's largest famine refugee camp accused government soldiers of starting the chaos by trying to steal some of the 290 tons of dry rations that aid workers were trying to distribute. Then refugees joined in the scramble, prompting soldiers to open fire, witnesses said.
FOOD
April 7, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Meet John Vena. At 58, he is the third John Vena in the family produce business, but he doesn't use stuffy suffixes like Junior or the Third. The first John Vena started in 1919 selling apples and oranges on Dock Street. He didn't live long enough to see the produce vendors moved from there in 1959 and into a wholesale produce market in an industrial park south of Packer Avenue that most Philadelphians would come to call the food distribution center. No doubt, though, that first John Vena would be proud to see his namesake serve on the board of directors of the Philadelphia Wholesale Produce Market (the food distribution center's formal name)
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