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Food Fight

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BUSINESS
September 9, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The Market at NewMarket, which opened last year as the keystone of a turnaround strategy for the Society Hill shopping complex, is nearly empty. Most of its vendors, who once peddled produce, fish, meat, bread and specialty items, have cleared their displays and quietly closed. "No business. Just not enough business, no customers," said Casey Ro of the produce firm Ro and Sons. Wayne Martin, spokesman for Fidelity Mutual Insurance, which owns the complex at 2nd and Lombard streets, said Fidelity hopes to decide within two months what to do at NewMarket.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Chris Brennan & Catherine Lucey and Daily News Staff Writers
THE BUDGET SCUFFLE between Mayor Nutter and City Council has moved to Harrisburg, where sources say the two sides are pushing for different legislative relief measures. The city's elected officials have been dueling for weeks over Nutter's proposal to move the city to a property-tax system based on market values, known as the Actual Value Initiative (AVI). Last week, Council overlooked Nutter's objections and gave preliminary approval to a plan delaying AVI for another year. Since then, sources say, Nutter and Council seem on different tracks in Harrisburg.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
Last month, a frenzy broke out when Mayor Nutter said he wanted to prohibit outdoor feeding of the homeless, especially on city parkland, including the Ben Franklin Parkway. Critics, mainly those who provide food for the hungry and homeless, claimed the city just wanted to get the homeless away from the Parkway, especially once the Barnes Museum opens. The city said that it's a health issue, that there should be safety measures in place for food and its handling — including running water — which can be better addressed indoors.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | By Chris Panzetta, Special to The Inquirer
Police in Radnor arrested 10 members of a Villanova University fraternity after a "food fight" on the front lawn of the Wayne Post Office about 3:30 a.m. last Thursday. Radnor police Sgt. John Rutty labeled the incident "a friendly war that got a little rough. " "It looked like they were actually in a physical fight," said Rutty, although no one was treated for injuries. According to Gary Bonas, Villanova University assistant director of student activities, the incident was a "purely internal" one involving Tau Kappa Omega, a fraternity whose house is in the 100 block of West Wayne Avenue, about 50 yards down the street.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | By Trudy Rubin
"Frankenstein foods. " That's what many Europeans call the genetically modified crops that America produces and exports across the Atlantic. Few Americans realize that since the early 1990s the Food and Drug Administration has been ruling that foods with GM (genetically modified) ingredients are safe and can be marketed without labels. But that good old American faith in science and progress would probably keep most U.S. consumers from worrying. Not so other parts of the world.
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
American Idol never-was Corey Clark, who earned his 15 minutes by claiming he had an affair with Idol judge Paula Abdul, has proven what a dangerous man he is. Clark was cited and released Saturday on a misdemeanor battery charge for his part in a . . . food fight. Police said Corey and his record company manager, Laura Kathleen Troy, were having breakfast in one of two hotel rooms they had rented in Sacramento, Calif., when an argument broke out about Clark's concert the night before in West Sacramento.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | BY SANDY GRADY
You need a split screen to watch the Bush White House careen between the Trivial and the Ominous. One minute these guys are mimicking "Saturday Night Live," the next minute they're replaying "Seven Days in May. " The trivial - which has done wonders for late-night comics and the broccoli industry - was George Bush's "No-I-Will-Not-Eat-My-Broccoli" ultimatum. The ominous is a tough question: What does Bush do if Soviet troops start killing people in the streets of Lithuania?
BUSINESS
February 16, 1988 | By JAMES C. LAWSON, Special to the Daily News
Salad bars, photo processing centers, takeout hot food, cosmeticians and larger stores that offer more non-food items have given a new look to the neighborhood supermarket. Hoping to build market share, ward off competitors and appeal to the needs of on-the-go shoppers, Philadelphia's major supermarket chains are sprucing up, restocking and expanding existing stores and building "super-size" stores. "Food retailers have tried to get into one-stop shopping since the early 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My husband and I fight about food, constantly. I grew up with fresh food. He grew up with chips and a candy bar as an integral part of every meal. It wasn't a big deal when we first got together, but I've since changed a lot (vegetarian, but I'll cook meat for him), and he believes he's the one making all of the compromises. That's true, but since they're for health reasons, I think he should do it and stick around another 50 to 70 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2011
DEAR ABBY: Because my 90-year-old mother is homebound, she qualifies for a meal program through a senior charity service. The program is free of charge for those in need. She didn't like some of the meals, so she asked me to give them to my father-in-law, "Louis. " Louis is 88. He still drives and is well-off, so he doesn't qualify for the program, but he accepted the meals that were offered. My mother has now decided she can no longer eat any of these meals, so I told her we should discontinue the program.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
March 20, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
As I drove into the parking lot of Roberto Clemente Middle School in North Philadelphia to start my cooking classes there, my competition was staring me in the face: a giant Burger King sign. The restaurant is not even a minute's walk from the school. Trying to convince kids to cook healthy meals in a fast-food world is hard enough. But with Whoppers wooing them across the parking lot? There ought to be a law! If I needed confirmation that these students, like so many other American middle schoolers, were eating this junk, I got that pretty quickly: My five eighth-grade girls answered a questionnaire about what they eat for dinner and how often they eat fast food.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
MAYBE THEY SHOULD call it a "Democratic disunity" meeting? York County businessman Tom Wolf will sit down for breakfast at the Oregon Diner in South Philly tomorrow morning with the three candidates he easily defeated in Tuesday's Democratic primary election for governor. U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, the city's Democratic Party chairman, asked the candidates last week to attend a "unity" meeting after the primary. They all agreed. But former Gov. Ed Rendell, who is also attending, predicts no "kissing and hugging" after the nasty primary campaign among Wolf, U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz and state Treasurer Rob McCord.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
Roots of renewal While appreciative of Inquirer coverage of the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia, as former long-time residents and civic activists there we can assure readers that revitalization efforts along Germantown Avenue have been in progress even longer than reported ("A warm welcome," March 2). As far back as 1979, a city-sponsored study of the needs along this part of the avenue by Johnson/Smith Architects was followed up by new street lighting, improvements to certain buildings, additional street trees, and major repairs to the avenue itself - all with the cooperation of the adjacent civic associations, including East and West Mount Airy Neighbors.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the seemingly genteel world of food charity, hunger-relief advocates are perceived as big-hearted humanitarians all rowing in the same direction. But lately, as need increases while food supplies contract, people more accustomed to fighting hunger now battle among themselves - do-gooder vs. do-gooder. What's developing locally is a noisy quarrel between two altruistic camps: those who help the hungry in Chester County, and the hunger-relief behemoth, Philabundance, based in South Philadelphia and serving nine counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
It's so tempting, I know. Costumes, masks, pranks, pop-culture sight gags, strange people coming to the door, eating jokes - Halloween just seems like an occasion designed for sitcoms. The episodes practically write themselves, don't they? Well, no. Halloween is actually like a theme-park tar pit for TV comedies. Every year, ignoring the danger, half the herd charges into the same trap - with the same tragic results. This year was the saddest in memory. The better half of Ben and Kate rigged up a costume that was part judicial robe/part baseball uniform to go as Babe Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My husband and I fight about food, constantly. I grew up with fresh food. He grew up with chips and a candy bar as an integral part of every meal. It wasn't a big deal when we first got together, but I've since changed a lot (vegetarian, but I'll cook meat for him), and he believes he's the one making all of the compromises. That's true, but since they're for health reasons, I think he should do it and stick around another 50 to 70 years.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
By Khadijah White U.S. District Judge William Yohn's recent ruling against Philadelphia's ban on outdoor feeding of the homeless pleased me both philosophically and personally - personally because I had spent a night in jail after questioning police officers who were preventing opponents of the ban from participating in a public hearing. The case against me was dropped shortly after Yohn's ruling. The city's outdoor feeding ban was part of a much larger legislative legacy of the Occupy movement in cities nationwide.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
Philip Dukes had a number of important jobs in the Philadelphia prison system, but the one that probably gave him the most satisfaction was running the work-release program.   As its director, Phil would find jobs for prisoners to fulfill the program's philosophy that if inmates could find meaningful work, it would help turn their lives around. And there's no doubt that many of the inmates whom Philip helped over the 10 years he had the job did find through work a way out of the troubles that got them locked up in the first place.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Chris Brennan & Catherine Lucey and Daily News Staff Writers
THE BUDGET SCUFFLE between Mayor Nutter and City Council has moved to Harrisburg, where sources say the two sides are pushing for different legislative relief measures. The city's elected officials have been dueling for weeks over Nutter's proposal to move the city to a property-tax system based on market values, known as the Actual Value Initiative (AVI). Last week, Council overlooked Nutter's objections and gave preliminary approval to a plan delaying AVI for another year. Since then, sources say, Nutter and Council seem on different tracks in Harrisburg.
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