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NEWS
August 22, 2003 | By Ben Kelley
The history of public health will record that lawsuits against tobacco companies played a leading role in the campaign against cigarettes and the diseases they cause. Does that mean that litigation against food companies will likewise be a major factor in reversing the alarming spread of obesity? Food companies are said to fear as much, but there are other options. Parallels between cigarettes and dangerously fattening foods have understandably caught the media's attention. More and more, press coverage of the obesity epidemic has focused on real or imagined litigation threats.
NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry J. Kearney Jr., 84, of Warminster, a food-industry executive, died of cancer Thursday, Nov. 4, at Abington Memorial Hospital. In 1962, he became sales manager for Thriftway Foods, a wholesale distributor. Later, when Thriftway merged with Fleming Cos., he was director of the firm's Shop 'n Bag supermarket division and vice president of development at Fleming. In 1996, Mr. Kearney spoke to guests at a dinner in his honor when he retired as a Fleming vice president. "I guarantee that if you get involved in your job with enthusiasm, doing and giving more than you are supposed to, you will soon be recognized and promoted into the inner circle of decision-making," he said.
SPORTS
June 12, 1996 | By Michael Sokolove, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press
You would think that inventing Fat-Free Entenmann's would be enough for one lifetime. But it is not for Gregory B. Murphy. Murphy, 47, a longtime executive in the food industry, will now try to help fix baseball. Yesterday, the former president of Kraft Foods' bakery division was named president and CEO of Major League Baseball Enterprises, a new entity designed to fast-forward the game into the modern era of sports marketing. "Major League Baseball Enterprises represents a bold attempt by Major League Baseball to strategically integrate its revenue producing entities for optimum growth," acting baseball commissioner Bud Selig said in a prepared statement announcing Murphy's hiring.
NEWS
March 30, 2004 | By John F. Banzhaf 3d
The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed a bill to ban so-called "frivolous" obesity lawsuits. But it's the bill - not the lawsuits - which is frivolous. If, as claimed, the basis of the bill is that all obesity lawsuits are inherently frivolous, then the bill is unnecessary because judges routinely toss out, and juries usually reject, truly frivolous lawsuits, and appellate court judges can easily reverse the few that survive. These suits - which seek to hold manufacturers liable despite the argument of personal responsibility - are no more frivolous than tobacco or other product liability lawsuits, especially in view of a recent poll showing that prospective jurors are almost as likely to vote for a fat plaintiff in a lawsuit against a fast-food company as for a smoking plaintiff in a suit against a tobacco company.
NEWS
December 23, 1986 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
James F. Hutton, a retired ARA senior executive who spent a half-century in the food-contract business, died Sunday while visiting his daughter in Maine. He was 70 and lived in Gladwyne, Montgomery County. Hutton served on ARA's board of directors from 1961 through 1973, and in 1966 was awarded the Gold Plate Award of the International Food Service Manufacturers Association, the catering industry's highest honor. He played a major role in winning ARA food contracts for international Olympic competitions, beginning with the 1968 Summer Games in Mexico City, through the 1984 Winter Games in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, and the Summer Games in Los Angeles the following July.
FOOD
May 11, 1988 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Feast on fast-food burgers and fries, or snack on sprouts from a salad bar. Either way, you get a taste of this man's success. The way food is fixed in restaurants, the ads you see, which additives go into the groceries you buy - all come under his scrutiny. Gulp down a diet drink, sip your favorite fruit juice or indulge in a glass of wine. He has had his say in the labeling of each. He just may be the most influential man in the food industry. Or, more correctly, outside the food industry.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Clark, the executive director of Philabundance, who has been credited as an innovator in the fight against hunger, announced his resignation from the agency Thursday. For 13 years, Clark, 61, ran the $50-million-a-year hunger-relief behemoth that is based in South Philadelphia and serves nine counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Philabundance moves 30 million pounds of food a year to 426 pantries in a region whose core is the poorest big city in America. Mark Bender, a member of the Philabundance board, was appointed interim executive director, according to a statement from Murvin Lackey, chairman of the board.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J. Spiegel, 85, formerly of Huntingdon Valley, owner and president of the company that developed tamper-resistant, heat-shrinkable plastic seals, died of lung cancer Sunday, Jan. 15, at Jupiter (Fla.) Medical Center. Mr. Spiegel grew up in South Philadelphia. His first job was working for his father, a wholesale furrier. In 1961, he and his younger brother, Jacob, started a firm, Gilbreth International. With $10,000 in borrowed money, they opened a tiny office in Germantown and began importing basic chemicals.
NEWS
November 17, 1993 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a real-life Horatio Alger story, a reach-for-the-stars, only-in- America tale of pluck and luck. And the press loved it. A dozen writers for business magazines and newspapers told the amazing tale of the hard-pressed suburban Philadelphia couple - parents of four beautiful kids - who in the winter of 1981 were down to their last $200. Instead of paying the electric or phone bills - both more than $200, anyway - the gutsy couple mixed and bottled $200 worth of mustard in their kitchen using an old family recipe.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SKINNED, headless rabbit hung upside down above a wood table, its feet bound and its arms outstretched as if it were racing toward the ground. The table was adorned with lavender baby's breath flowers, a glass of white wine and the ingredients used in Osteria's signature dish, casalinga , or rabbit with polenta: kosher salt, butter, rosemary, sage and pancetta . For fine diners at the Spring Garden restaurant, this is dinner. For visiting art teacher Deva Watson and her four students from Southwest Leadership Academy Charter School, in the Paschall section of Southwest Philly, this is art. Food linked with art is one of Watson's out-of-the-box ideas that excite her bosses, nonprofit officials and, most significantly, her students.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Clark, the executive director of Philabundance, who has been credited as an innovator in the fight against hunger, announced his resignation from the agency Thursday. For 13 years, Clark, 61, ran the $50-million-a-year hunger-relief behemoth that is based in South Philadelphia and serves nine counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Philabundance moves 30 million pounds of food a year to 426 pantries in a region whose core is the poorest big city in America. Mark Bender, a member of the Philabundance board, was appointed interim executive director, according to a statement from Murvin Lackey, chairman of the board.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2014
LAST WEEK'S column, "Fat, Obese? Blame Yourself" really fired up many Daily News readers, so much so, that quite a few were compelled to write me. Never one to shy away from controversy, here's what some of our readers had to say (letters edited for space): Ms. Garrison, I am all in favor of people's taking responsibility for their conduct and decisions. Not everyone who is overweight or obese got there because of poor eating habits. The causes of obesity are not necessarily that one's eating habits are poor or out of control.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the seemingly genteel world of food charity, hunger-relief advocates are perceived as big-hearted humanitarians all rowing in the same direction. But lately, as need increases while food supplies contract, people more accustomed to fighting hunger now battle among themselves - do-gooder vs. do-gooder. What's developing locally is a noisy quarrel between two altruistic camps: those who help the hungry in Chester County, and the hunger-relief behemoth, Philabundance, based in South Philadelphia and serving nine counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
FOOD
January 24, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last few years, Philly's mobile-food industry has finally begun to catch up with the city's impressive restaurant scene, as dozens of chefs and entrepreneurs debut creative concepts well beyond gyros and soft pretzels. Now, those food trucks selling pork-cheek tacos and grass-fed burgers are spurring a secondary market: new and improved commissaries designed just for them. The facilities are equipped not just with basic prep tables and sanitizing sinks, but also with full commercial kitchens, secure parking, and lots of extras.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013
IF YOU ARE thirsty for knowledge and hungry for justice on global food issues, sink your teeth into my favorite books: 1TomatoLand: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit After reading Barry Estabrook's book and discovering the agribusiness slavery practiced today in the U.S. to produce these crops, you may never eat a commercially grown tomato again. 2Food Rebellions! Become a knowledgeable citizen of the world as Eric Holt-Gimenez and Raj Patel give you the 4-1-1 on the global food crisis and why more than 8 million people needlessly starve every day. 3Your Right to Know: Genetic Engineering and the Secret Changes in Your Food Andrew Kimbrell's illustrated shopper's guide reveals all the secrets about your food that are hidden in plain view.
FOOD
March 28, 2013
Salt Sugar Fat How the Food Giants Hooked Us By Michael Moss Random House. 480 pp. $28 Reviewed by Jessica Gresko   A can of Coke contains roughly nine teaspoons of sugar. Lunchables were created as a way to revive a flagging interest in bologna. People like chips that snap with about four pounds of pressure per square inch. Those are just some of the nuggets of information Michael Moss feeds readers in his new book about the food industry, Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us . But while the book is sprinkled with food facts, Moss doesn't just want to entertain.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SKINNED, headless rabbit hung upside down above a wood table, its feet bound and its arms outstretched as if it were racing toward the ground. The table was adorned with lavender baby's breath flowers, a glass of white wine and the ingredients used in Osteria's signature dish, casalinga , or rabbit with polenta: kosher salt, butter, rosemary, sage and pancetta . For fine diners at the Spring Garden restaurant, this is dinner. For visiting art teacher Deva Watson and her four students from Southwest Leadership Academy Charter School, in the Paschall section of Southwest Philly, this is art. Food linked with art is one of Watson's out-of-the-box ideas that excite her bosses, nonprofit officials and, most significantly, her students.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | Associated Press
Food trucks selling gourmet goods such as tacos, barbecue and cupcakes have grown in popularity in recent years. But people have been buying street food for generations. Food carts were already a fixture in many cities in the 1800s. Hot dog, sausage and pretzel vendors have been selling quick lunches to office workers and tourists on city streets and in beach towns since the early 1900s. The website for Good Humor ice cream says the company's first trucks hit the road in 1920.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J. Spiegel, 85, formerly of Huntingdon Valley, owner and president of the company that developed tamper-resistant, heat-shrinkable plastic seals, died of lung cancer Sunday, Jan. 15, at Jupiter (Fla.) Medical Center. Mr. Spiegel grew up in South Philadelphia. His first job was working for his father, a wholesale furrier. In 1961, he and his younger brother, Jacob, started a firm, Gilbreth International. With $10,000 in borrowed money, they opened a tiny office in Germantown and began importing basic chemicals.
NEWS
May 22, 2011 | By Alexa Olesen, Associated Press
BEIJING - Toxic bean sprouts, filthy cooking oil, drug-tainted pork: The relentless headlines in Chinese media have churned up queasy feelings for months about the dangers lurking in the nation's dinner bowls. The stories are grim reading but they show that China's usually strict censors are allowing the media more latitude to help it monitor a food industry long riddled with problems. The central government has been cautiously encouraging a sudden burst in food safety muckraking.
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