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Food Poisoning

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NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
There were few things that Jerome Rodio, a retired Philadelphia police officer, loved more than fishing. On a dock last week on Chesapeake Bay, Rodio watched as an older man worked to bring up several crab traps. Rodio, 75, offered to help. A trap scratched the inside of Rodio's arm as he lifted it out of the shallow water. Three days later, Rodio, of Oxford, Chester County, was dead. "At one point he showed me the scratch and we laughed about it," said son Gene, who accompanied his father on a boat that morning to reel in perch.
FOOD
August 25, 1991 | By Edward R. Blonz, Special to The Inquirer
Bacterial food poisoning is likely to cause six million illnesses and more than 9,000 deaths in the United States this year. Rather than showing signs of going away, the problem is getting worse. In healthy individuals, most bouts of food poisoning pass quickly. But for those with impaired immune systems, the malady can have grave consequences. Most people have experienced food poisoning. It usually results in a queasy stomach, intestinal upset and a sick feeling. Often, what people think to be the 24-hour flu is actually the result of eating a tainted meal.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | By Amy Alexander, Daily News Staff Writer
Food poisoning is a real danger during these hot summer days, because while the sun beats down on you, bacteria may be having a picnic in your potato salad. High-protein foods are often targeted by the bacteria staphylococcus aureus, a common cause of food poisoning, said Dr. Annette Reboli, an infectious disease specialist at Hahnemann University Hospital. Food preparation requires extra care in the summer, since bacteria tend to incubate more rapidly during warm, humid weather.
SPORTS
October 7, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
A caller to the University of Miami's sports information media office yesterday wanted to know if reporters had heard the latest from Tallahassee: Somebody was planning to poison the food served to Miami players this weekend at the team hotel. The caller, who refused to identify himself, said he heard about the plan from Florida State fans in the Tallahassee area Tuesday. UM players and officials laughed off the rumor. Joked UM assistant athletic director Dave Scott, "We're going to put the freshmen at the head of the chow line.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
When preparing food at home, do you: Clean sponges with soap to kill bacteria after wiping up drippings on countertops? Cover Tupperware containers when cooling hot food in the fridge? Rinse chicken in the sink? All not good. "Washing a sponge with soap doesn't get rid of bacteria," said microbiologist Michael Doyle, director of the University of Georgia's Center for Food Safety. They grow at room temperature and get spread around anything else you wipe off. "Put the sponge in a microwave for one minute to kill the salmonella and other bacteria," he said.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
An apparent outbreak of food poisoning at a Delaware County nursing home has left six residents hospitalized and two others slightly ill, according to state health officials and the nursing home. Residents at the Longwood Villa Geriatric Center in Bethel Township reported feeling ill beginning July 3. By this week, six had been admitted to Sacred Heart Medical Center in Chester, according to nursing home administrator Betty Thummel. Officials at the state Department of Health investigated the nursing home this week and confirmed that the residents were suffering from salmonellosis, a form of food poisoning, said Health Department spokesman Bob Fisher.
SPORTS
November 7, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Miami Heat center Alonzo Mourning was held out of last night's game against the Seattle SuperSonics because of food poisoning. Mourning, who sat out 69 games last year with a kidney disorder but is averaging nearly 22 points per game this season, missed the team's shootaround after experiencing flu-like symptoms overnight. Team spokesman Tim Donovan said Mourning's food poisoning is unrelated to his kidney condition, known as focal glomerulosclerosis. Donovan said Mourning called team trainer Ron Culp before the team's shootaround and said he couldn't keep any food down.
NEWS
December 30, 1986 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventy-seven patrons became ill with salmonella food poisoning last month after eating corned beef at the Famous Deli, 700 S. Fourth St., a city health official said yesterday. In addition, 17 employees of the restaurant were found to be infected with the Salmonella B-Heidelberg virus, said Stephen Foelster, acting assistant chief of the food-protection division of the Department of Public Health. The employees received letters from the department prohibiting them from returning to work until they tested free of the bacteria.
SPORTS
March 24, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Tiger Woods split the middle of the fairway with a 3-wood, then ducked outside the ropes and dropped to his knees, his stomach heaving from a nasty bout of food poisoning. He never had it so difficult, nor has he ever made winning look so easy. Sickened by some bad pasta that caused him to vomit through the night and rain yesterday, Woods still managed to win the Bay Hill Invitational in Orlando, Fla., for the fourth straight year by going the final 44 holes without a bogey and winning by 11 strokes.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | By Aileen Soper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Montgomery County health officials are investigating whether food poisoning was the culprit behind an outbreak of nausea, vomiting and diarrhea experienced by at least 25 of the 230 people who attended a charity barbecue held Saturday at the borough playground. The flu-like symptoms were not severe enough to require any hospitalizations, said Jessica Bernstiel, the county disease-intervention specialist who is heading the Health Department inquiry. The event, which was open to the public, was sponsored by the Fourth of July Committee, a local citizen group that raises money for children's events such as the Halloween Parade, Easter egg hunt, Boy and Girl Scouts and the Fourth of July fireworks, said Borough Manager William Martin.
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NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
There were few things that Jerome Rodio, a retired Philadelphia police officer, loved more than fishing. On a dock last week on Chesapeake Bay, Rodio watched as an older man worked to bring up several crab traps. Rodio, 75, offered to help. A trap scratched the inside of Rodio's arm as he lifted it out of the shallow water. Three days later, Rodio, of Oxford, Chester County, was dead. "At one point he showed me the scratch and we laughed about it," said son Gene, who accompanied his father on a boat that morning to reel in perch.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
There are three health violations that are sure to temporarily shut down an eatery in Philadelphia: no hot water, a rodent infestation, and not having an employee on site who has passed a food safety course. But it's the last infraction - having no one on duty trained to prevent food poisoning - that triggers the overwhelming number of closures. According to a spokesman for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, eateries usually get one pass. But if an inspector returns, and a food safety certified person is still missing, the business is asked to "discontinue food operations" for at least the rest of the day. During the last week, the health department temporarily shuttered 19 restaurants and neighborhood groceries.
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
The health department usually inspects a Philadelphia eatery once a year. At Copabanana on South Street, however, sanitarians have dropped in six times since January and asked it to shut down twice. The margarita and burger joint has a chronic problem with keeping food at safe temperatures. When perishable items are stored between 42 and 165 degrees Fahrenheit, toxic bacteria - the types that can cause food poisoning - can multiply quickly. On May 18  a sanitarian found calamari and coleslaw stored at 46 degrees, 5 degrees warmer than is considered safe.
NEWS
May 4, 2016
ISSUE | RESTAURANTS Post inspections Kudos to the Inquirer and Philly.com and their Clean Plates web page for providing access to the results of inspections of area restaurants. However, the public may need more information. For example, I recently walked by a restaurant near City Hall that had 19 illness-risk and retail violations, yet it was doing a booming lunch business. Food poisoning is horrendous to recover from, and I urge the Inquirer to continue publishing restaurant inspection reports.
NEWS
February 17, 2015
ISSUE | CREDENTIALS Qualified, unlicensed There are many qualified, competent, and expert therapists who lack a Pennsylvania license ("Abuse expert lacks Pa. license," Feb. 7). As a Pennsylvania-certified - but not licensed - psychotherapist, I want to reassure Inquirer readers who followed news of the perjury charges against a psychologist over her expert-witness testimony: They can and will get excellent therapy from unlicensed individuals. The real issue in the case of child-abuse expert Sue Cornbluth is that an individual allegedly lied about her credentials.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
When preparing food at home, do you: Clean sponges with soap to kill bacteria after wiping up drippings on countertops? Cover Tupperware containers when cooling hot food in the fridge? Rinse chicken in the sink? All not good. "Washing a sponge with soap doesn't get rid of bacteria," said microbiologist Michael Doyle, director of the University of Georgia's Center for Food Safety. They grow at room temperature and get spread around anything else you wipe off. "Put the sponge in a microwave for one minute to kill the salmonella and other bacteria," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
THIS TIME, Justin Bieber is blaming food poisoning for forcing him to stop his show in Buenos Aires - the second stoppage during his South America tour. "I'm not feeling too good, I think I'm out of energy," he told the unhappy crowd, saying he was sorry and blowing a kiss before walking off the stage while the boos escalated. Bieber posted a "selfie" photo on Twitter showing himself receiving intravenous fluids, and his manager, Scooter Braun , came to his defense. Braun said that Bieber's food poisoning was so severe, he spent eight hours on an IV drip before Sunday night's show, and doctors advised canceling, but Bieber didn't want to disappoint his fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013
DEAR ABBY: When friends and family get together, the conversation often turns to the subject of health. They look to each other for support and tips to get through the flu or a nasty case of food poisoning, and rely on each other's experience to tackle challenges like quitting smoking, managing heart disease, diabetes, menopause or conquering insomnia. To help your readers support their loved ones, the FDA's Office of Women's Health and the GSA's Federal Citizen Information Center have created the free Friends and Family Health Kit. It contains more than 20 publications that feature health-care and prevention tips for women and their families.
TRAVEL
April 14, 2013
When mild health issues crop up, such as a persistent cough or food poisoning, you have the power to self-heal. But you'll need the proper instruments. "If people have the skills to self-treat for minor respiratory illness or diarrhea, it's sort of empowering," said Phyllis Kozarsky, a travel health consultant for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Before you depart on your travels, the CDC consultant recommends visiting the pharmacy aisles to collect some necessary items.
SPORTS
August 31, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - It didn't take long to see that Novak Djokovic's right shoulder is feeling fine. Which was good, because he was on court for less than an hour yesterday. Djokovic began his first-round match at the U.S. Open with a 121 mph service winner. Four points later, he closed that game with a 120 mph ace. He whipped forehands exactly where he wanted them. He returned well, too. Playing his first match since Aug. 21, when he quit a match because of a sore and tired shoulder, the top-seeded Djokovic began setting aside any questions about his fitness for Flushing Meadows, building a 6-0, 5-1 lead before qualifier Conor Niland, of Ireland, stopped after 44 minutes.
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