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Food Safety

NEWS
May 28, 2013
By Christina Weiss Lurie and Joan C. Hendricks After years of being under the radar, America's hunger crisis is becoming a growing reality for many people. One in six Americans goes to bed every night with empty stomachs. Poverty is forcing millions into "food insecurity" - the inability to know where your next meal is coming from. Families are buying cheaper, less nutritious food or cutting meals entirely. The problem is not a lack of food; it's the inability to provide nutritious, safe, affordable food for everyone.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A state senator thinks that Pennsylvania ought to do what no other state, including left-leaning California, has done: require that food products be labeled to show whether they contain genetically engineered ingredients. Or at the very least, said Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery), the bill he introduced Tuesday should start a conversation here on one of the hottest topics in consumer health circles. "I am concerned about the lack of information available about the presence of genetically engineered food, and I believe it is every consumer's right to know what ingredients are found in the products they buy," Leach said Tuesday in an interview.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Fewer food-safety inspections and an increased risk to consumers will result from the lack of a new 2013 budget from Congress and the impending across-the-board spending cuts, Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said Thursday. The cuts were to take effect Friday unless the White House and Congress could come to a budget agreement. The reduced inspections and budget cuts could delay a new food safety law that requires the agency to boost inspections and directs farms and food facilities to ensure their food is safe.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
The Food and Drug Administration has proposed the most sweeping changes in food-safety rules in decades. The changes being made under the Food Safety Modernization Act, which became law in 2011, are long overdue and should be implemented as soon as possible. If adopted, the new rules would require farmers to take common-sense precautions against food contamination by making sure workers wash their hands, irrigation water is clean, and animals are kept out of fruit and vegetable fields.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Jeri Clausing, Associated Press
PORTALES, N.M. - Farmers in a revered peanut-growing region along the New Mexico-Texas border should be celebrating one of the best harvests in recent memory. Instead, millions of pounds of their prized sweet Valencia peanuts sit in barns at a peanut butter plant shuttered for two months amid a salmonella outbreak that sickened 41 people in 20 states. Farmers are worried about getting paid for their peanuts, nearly one-third of the plant's 150 workers have been laid off, and residents wonder what toll an increasingly contentious showdown between the nation's largest organic peanut butter plant and federal regulators could ultimately have on the region's economy.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Just because some businesses are labeled "small" doesn't mean they aren't trying to solve some big problems. Consider Radnor-based Novira Therapeutics Inc. , which is developing antiviral drugs to treat chronic hepatitis B and HIV infections. Both are serious conditions. There were about 34.2 million people worldwide living with HIV infection in 2011, including about 1.2 million in the United States. Hepatitis B infection, which is rare in the United States thanks to infant vaccinations, attacks the liver and is a major health problem in Asia, particularly China.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2012 | By David Sell and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The economic turmoil in much of the industrialized world has affected the drug industry, but regulatory leaders from the United States, Canada, and Europe said Monday that safety and science must not be compromised for the sake of jobs that might be created if rules were relaxed. "We all live in a world where there are important politics that pound at the door," said Margaret Hamburg, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "Science must be the critical tool that guides us in our decision making.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | Daily News Staff Report
Food is a science, as well as an art, thus the topic gets attention during this year's Philadelphia Science Festival, starting Friday through April 29. Among the highlights is a rare public appearance by legendary local chef Shola Olunloyo, wh*o will do a chemistry lab-meets-kitchen demo/discussion, "Extraction: Food and Flavor," 7 p.m. Tuesday at World Cafe Live in West Philly ($25). "All Things Fermented: The Science of Beer and Cheese" is the topic for a tasting and discussion, 3:30 p.m. April 28 at Triumph Brewing in Old City ($50, 21-plus)
NEWS
March 16, 2012
Like the troubled individuals they often serve, the Good Samaritans doling out free sandwiches to the homeless along Philadelphia's signature boulevard may need a little tough love. That describes Mayor Nutter's smart decision to ban food handouts in city parks, which includes the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. After several years of trying to persuade community and church-based volunteer groups to move indoors willingly with their feedings of hundreds of people, Nutter needed to kick it up a notch.
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