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Food Science

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NEWS
August 2, 2009 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget what your parents said. It's OK to play with your food. In fact, it pays good money. That lesson - along with why Limburger cheese smells like feet (same type of bacteria), how long it takes to wash hands properly (15 to 20 seconds), and how to get students into an important but often overlooked science - was among those learned by elementary and high school teachers at Gloucester County College's summer workshop series on food science, which will wrap up Tuesday. Not food service.
NEWS
August 2, 2009 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forget what your parents said. It's OK to play with your food. In fact, it pays good money. That lesson - along with why Limburger cheese smells like feet (same type of bacteria), how long it takes to wash hands properly (15 to 20 seconds), and how to get students into an important but often overlooked science - was among those learned by elementary and high school teachers at Gloucester County College's summer workshop series on food science, which will wrap up Tuesday. Not food service . Not consumer science, also known as home economics.
FOOD
March 2, 1997 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget the parental edict that says: "Don't play with your food. " Playing with food and learning about food science is the essence of the Supermarket Science exhibit at the Please Touch Museum, 210 N. 21st St. There, tots are encouraged to shop a child-size mockup of supermarket aisles and checkout lanes filled with authentic packaging (empty) and plastic produce, loading carts with faux food, counting out "purchases" and play-cooking in mini-kitchens with small utensils.
FOOD
November 5, 1997 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
While Julia Child and Madeleine Kamman were teaching Americans the basics of French cooking, and Marcella Hazan was introducing us to the variety of Italian cuisine, Shirley Corriher was explaining to cooks across the country how cooking works. Why breads rise . . . why vegetables change color . . . what happens when you change ingredients or mix them a different way. "I used to carry Madeleine's first edition [of The Making of a Cook] around with me," Corriher said from her home in Atlanta.
NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By Michael Smerconish
I'm certain Sarah Palin spoke for many when she tweeted upon hearing the news that a New York judge had prevented implementation of Mayor Michael Bloomberg's efforts to regulate sugary drinks: "Victory in NYC for liberty-loving soda drinkers. To politicians with too much time on their hands we say: Govt, stay out of my refrigerator!" No doubt those "liberty lovers" view dietary habits as a matter of free will and personal responsibility. If only things were so simple. There's no question that most of us can do something about our weight.
FOOD
September 19, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
HOT FROM THE OVEN If you're a baker who's interested in making some dough, the City of Philadelphia is looking for you. As part of the ceremonies celebrating the restoration of the City Hall Tower, the city is holding a cake baking and decorating contest on Oct. 3. The theme is "City Hall," and amateurs and professionals alike can enter. Two top winners will get $500 each, and there will be other prizes. To enter by the deadline of next Wednesday, call 546-8862. MORE HOT NEWS Chili peppers burn your fingers and can make you cry and sweat, but still, people come back for more.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | By Zlati Meyer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Among the cans of Campbell's tomato soup, boxes of Mueller's lasagne noodles, Multi-Grain Cheerios and other staples in Sharon K. Gerdes' pantry sat Instant Tender Jel-C, high-oil cinnamon and Dimodan ESK. The industrial starch, spice and emulsifier are ingredients of Gerdes' industry. As a food scientist, she is called upon to troubleshoot ailments, and she has worked on SnackWell's low-fat blueberry muffins, cholesterol-free, low-fat cakes for the Harry and David gift-food company and Nutri/System's buttermilk-pancake mix. The 48-year-old runs a one-woman food-technology consulting firm that helps companies copy competitors' products and improve their recipes.
LIVING
April 20, 2000 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chomp. Chomp. Chomp. Chomp. When Sunday rolls around and you're digging into the Easter candy, you'll probably grab a few jelly beans, right? You'll pop a cherry or a licorice one in your mouth and take - what? - four chews. And it will be gone. When you're about to inhale one of those take-me-for-granted jelly beans, consider this: It takes seven days to make a single jelly bean. Longer, according to Genesis, than it took God to create heaven and earth. Far too long, for the taste of confectionery companies.
NEWS
January 2, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The party was over hours ago. The lipstick-stained glasses are still in the sink. And oops! You forgot to pump the air out of that bottle of pinot noir, now growing funkier by the minute on your kitchen counter. Fear not. Scientists from Pennsylvania State University are on the case. In a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they described using compounds called chelators to prevent wine from going bad. It was just a laboratory study, and the chelators are not something that will be approved for use by your local vineyard or wine bar anytime soon.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The students at Delaware Valley College are throwing a party this weekend, and everyone is invited. Their weekend bash, designed to show off the college, will have all the ingredients of a country fair, including livestock exhibits, planting demonstrations, arts and crafts, music and food. "The main thrust is to give the students an opportunity to display their developing expertise so the community has a better picture of what Delaware Valley is and what it means," said Robert Buggeln, executive assistant to the president.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
THE FOURTH annual Harvest on Henry event last month was no pie-in-the-sky venture. It raised $13,000 to support the educational agricultural opportunities at Henry Got Crops CSA, a community-supported agriculture partnership between Saul High School, Weavers Way Food Co-op, Weavers Way Community Programs and Fairmount Park. The daylong festival gave Saul students a chance to interact with the public and featured farm-inspired activities, such as hay rides, pumpkin crafts and - to show off students' cooking skills - a pie-baking contest.
NEWS
January 2, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The party was over hours ago. The lipstick-stained glasses are still in the sink. And oops! You forgot to pump the air out of that bottle of pinot noir, now growing funkier by the minute on your kitchen counter. Fear not. Scientists from Pennsylvania State University are on the case. In a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they described using compounds called chelators to prevent wine from going bad. It was just a laboratory study, and the chelators are not something that will be approved for use by your local vineyard or wine bar anytime soon.
NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By Michael Smerconish
I'm certain Sarah Palin spoke for many when she tweeted upon hearing the news that a New York judge had prevented implementation of Mayor Michael Bloomberg's efforts to regulate sugary drinks: "Victory in NYC for liberty-loving soda drinkers. To politicians with too much time on their hands we say: Govt, stay out of my refrigerator!" No doubt those "liberty lovers" view dietary habits as a matter of free will and personal responsibility. If only things were so simple. There's no question that most of us can do something about our weight.
FOOD
January 25, 2013 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
It didn't take long for chicken nuggets, the go-to protein for many American children, to come up in conversation when Eli Kulp and the staff of Fork were brainstorming snack ideas for the bar menu at the Market Street restaurant. "Chicken nuggets have all-American roots," says Kulp, the executive chef of the Old City restaurant. That means they're appropriate fodder for Fork, where the challenge is "taking familiar food and presenting it in new ways or shedding new light on it," Kulp says.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker and Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writers
Southwest Philadelphia resident Mona West has a simple strategy for combatting rising food prices. "I buy less," she said. West's friend Gail Glenn of Pine Hill, N.J., has a different approach: "Just stomach it. You have to eat. " The two reacted this week to the prospect of higher food prices next year because of the severe drought searing the Midwest grain belt. The forecast for this year's harvest of U.S. field corn - not the sort bought at farm stands to eat off the cob - is down 27 percent from earlier this season because of weather that has scorched more of the nation's farmland than any other drought in the last 50 years, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
For the Yardley old-timers who've known this riverside luncheonette for nearly four decades as Charcoal Steaks n' Things, a go-to diner for pit-grilled burgers, turkey clubs, and Western omelets, the breakfast and lunch menus are still "safe. " After all, owner Anton "Tony" Plescha, who took two years to rebuild this institution (now elevated 10 feet above ground) after a devastating Delaware River flood in 2006, still happily mans the a.m. griddle. But when the dinner hour arrives and Plescha's executive-chef sons, Mark, 28, and Eric, 26, take over, the BYOB now known simply as Charcoal morphs into a kitchen of ultramodern ambition heretofore unexpected in this quaint Bucks County borough.
NEWS
August 2, 2009 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget what your parents said. It's OK to play with your food. In fact, it pays good money. That lesson - along with why Limburger cheese smells like feet (same type of bacteria), how long it takes to wash hands properly (15 to 20 seconds), and how to get students into an important but often overlooked science - was among those learned by elementary and high school teachers at Gloucester County College's summer workshop series on food science, which will wrap up Tuesday. Not food service.
NEWS
August 2, 2009 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forget what your parents said. It's OK to play with your food. In fact, it pays good money. That lesson - along with why Limburger cheese smells like feet (same type of bacteria), how long it takes to wash hands properly (15 to 20 seconds), and how to get students into an important but often overlooked science - was among those learned by elementary and high school teachers at Gloucester County College's summer workshop series on food science, which will wrap up Tuesday. Not food service . Not consumer science, also known as home economics.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | By Zlati Meyer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Among the cans of Campbell's tomato soup, boxes of Mueller's lasagne noodles, Multi-Grain Cheerios and other staples in Sharon K. Gerdes' pantry sat Instant Tender Jel-C, high-oil cinnamon and Dimodan ESK. The industrial starch, spice and emulsifier are ingredients of Gerdes' industry. As a food scientist, she is called upon to troubleshoot ailments, and she has worked on SnackWell's low-fat blueberry muffins, cholesterol-free, low-fat cakes for the Harry and David gift-food company and Nutri/System's buttermilk-pancake mix. The 48-year-old runs a one-woman food-technology consulting firm that helps companies copy competitors' products and improve their recipes.
LIVING
April 20, 2000 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chomp. Chomp. Chomp. Chomp. When Sunday rolls around and you're digging into the Easter candy, you'll probably grab a few jelly beans, right? You'll pop a cherry or a licorice one in your mouth and take - what? - four chews. And it will be gone. When you're about to inhale one of those take-me-for-granted jelly beans, consider this: It takes seven days to make a single jelly bean. Longer, according to Genesis, than it took God to create heaven and earth. Far too long, for the taste of confectionery companies.
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