CollectionsFood Stamps
IN THE NEWS

Food Stamps

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Steven Small, 33, wanted to be in politics so badly, they say he tried for spots in several City Council offices . . . in his own way. Police yesterday arrested Small, of Media Avenue near 55th Street, as he allegedly hawked food stamps on the corner of 54th and Master in his West Philadelphia neighborhood. At the time, Small was posing as Lester Brown, administrative assistant for Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell's office, police said. After the arrest, a quick call to Blackwell's office disclosed that the Lester Brown who worked there was in the office, working.
NEWS
June 11, 2015
WHAT'S THE worst non-capital crime there is? Child abuse? Rape? Public corruption? According to at least one of our state lawmakers, the worst crime you can commit is possessing enough drugs to warrant a felony conviction . . . which, in this state could be a small amount of marijuana, or a second offense for possession. Rep. Mike Regan, R-Dillsburg, wants to impose a lifetime ban on food stamp and Temporary Aid to Needy Families benefits to anyone convicted of a felony drug offense.
NEWS
November 19, 2009
THANKS for your edit on the alarming number of children who've received food stamps at some point. Many people don't realize just how vital that safety-net program is. Without it, we'd have much higher rates of hunger in this country. In Pennsylvania, the number of children in the program has risen 37 percent in the last five years. Considering your readership likely encompasses more than Pennsylvanians, it would be prudent to point out that the eligibility requirements of the program (now the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance)
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Welfare recipients will be able to get supplemental food stamps next month if the General Assembly has not adopted a state budget by Monday's deadline, a state welfare official said yesterday. Yvette Jackson, the Department of Public Welfare's acting deputy secretary for income maintenance, said federal officials had given the department tentative approval to award extra food stamps in the event the Casey administration cannot issue welfare checks next month. Under state law, the government loses the authority to spend money - including payments to welfare recipients, funding for schools and payroll for state employees - if the legislature has not approved a new budget by the start of the 1992 fiscal year.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | by Rob Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
A major fraud ring in the city has been stamped out. Thirteen people have been arrested after a yearlong undercover investigation into illegal trafficking of food stamps at six local take-out restaurants, District Attorney Lynne Abraham said yesterday. Employees of the following eateries were arrested: Number 1 Kitchen, at 5th Street near Cumberland; Eddie's Chinese Restaurant, on Allegheny Avenue near Lee Street; Kitchen Express, on 2nd Street near Dauphin Street; Yung Hinh Inn on 52nd Street near Irving Street; Antai Kitchen on Chew Avenue near Woodlawn Avenue; and another Number 1 Kitchen, on Washington Lane near Stenton Avenue.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
OF ALL THE distortions and downright lies about the food-stamp program that have been trotted out in recent weeks, perhaps the biggest howler is the one advanced by the Wall Street Journal editorial page. It said the program is "becoming the latest middle-class entitlement. " The actual fact is that no one within shouting distance of middle class is eligible for food stamps: According to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, 85 percent of recipients have incomes below the poverty line — $18,500 for a family of three — with the rest barely above it. Last week, the House Agricultural Committee passed a five-year reauthorization of the farm bill that cuts $16 billion in food stamps while keeping several subsidies for corporate farmers intact.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Federal agents yesterday arrested four city residents and were seeking two others on charges of trafficking in food stamps, a widespread problem in Philadelphia, prosecutors say. In each case, the defendants were accused of purchasing food stamps for roughly half their face value near locations where food-stamp recipients pick up their coupons each month. One defendant on one occasion allegedly traded $1,000 cash and a Batman T- Shirt for $2,180 in food stamps, authorities said.
NEWS
March 12, 1998
Immigrants from scores of countries are changing the face of this city, as the Daily News reported Tuesday in a special section, "The New Philadelphians. " But some of those immigrants are hungry, victims of the shortsighted - not to mention cruel - cutoff of food stamps in the 1996 welfare reform act. Around the state, food banks are reporting a surge in hungry people, some of them immigrants, including children. Other legal immigrants are disabled or elderly - not able to become citizens, which would re-qualify them for food assistance.
NEWS
November 18, 1996
When it comes to making laws that affect poor people, legislators everywhere in the country are generous at serving up rhetoric. Apparently, few are hungry for firsthand knowledge. Only about a dozen state legislators in Pennsylvania have taken the challenge to "walk a mile" in the shoes of welfare recipients and the working poor this month. As part of a program sponsored here by the Community Action Association of Pennsylvania, the legislators will live on typical food-stamp allotments for their county.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LINCOLN PARK, Mich. - A Michigan lottery winner was charged with fraud Tuesday for collecting food stamps and public health insurance despite having pocketed a $735,000 jackpot. Amanda Clayton, 25, was silent during a brief court hearing after spending a night in jail. A not-guilty plea was entered, and her lawyer vowed to fight the charges. Clayton is the second person in Michigan caught with food stamps despite newly minted wealth. Gov. Rick Snyder last week signed a law requiring the lottery to notify the Human Services Department when someone wins at least $1,000.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 9, 2016
ISSUE | UNIONS A matter of respect In "Coping with a union workforce" (Philly.com, Wednesday), Team Clean president Donna Allie dismissed some of her employees, saying, "Some people don't want to do anything. Then they run to the union for protection. " I've been a cleaner for 16 years and a proud member of Service Employees International Union Local 32BJ for 11 years. We work hard and take pride in our work. Our hard work makes Team Clean and many other businesses profitable.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
ISSUE | MINIMUM WAGE Working hard for a better living An article about fast-food worker and activist Shymara Jones effectively described her rationale for a $15-an-hour minimum wage and her significant effort to achieve that goal ("A voice for change," Sunday). She has a high school diploma and some college credits, but her labor-organizing activities have demonstrated initiative, leadership, and the potential to succeed in a more lucrative occupation. It appears she would be better off diverting that effort to focus on getting a higher-paying job. She indicated that increased income would make her happy and more independent.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
The world stopped making sense for Theresa Drebes a few years back. Because of crushing medical bills, she and her husband couldn't afford enough food, yet were unable to receive food stamps because the federal government said they brought in too much money. "I'm not in poverty, but I am poor," said Drebes, 60, who lives in Lansdale, Montgomery County. "Just pray to God you don't fall into a situation like ours. " To be poor is to live in a whirlwind of want, unsettled and insecure.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bucks County man who has spent decades filing lawsuits that allege discrimination over his physical disabilities - he once argued that his service dog needed food stamps - has admitted lying about his impairments. James George Douris, 60, pleaded guilty in Bucks County Court on Wednesday to felony perjury. The charge stemmed from a court proceeding last year at which Douris claimed he was unable to walk, hold a glass of water, or sign his own name. Detectives proved otherwise, catching him engaged in various forms of physical activity, such as standing on a ladder, pushing a wheelbarrow, and using an electric saw. "This is our best bet at putting it all to an end," prosecutor Jonathan Long said after Douris' plea.
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
Leave it to a Canadian to put a positive spin on SNAP (a.k.a. food stamps), a program whose ungainly full name is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program . "We don't have food stamps in Canada. A lot of Americans don't appreciate that the program is actually really cool and effective," says Leanne Brown , author of Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4 a Day (Workman). She'll discuss the book and sign copies Tuesday, Oct. 27 at the Free Library of Philadelphia . The book has become an unlikely phenomenon, and the interest in it started before it was officially published in July.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bent on making fresh fruits and vegetables available to more Americans, the U.S. Department of Agriculture sent one of its top officials Thursday to the Clark Park Farmers Market to tout its efforts at doing just that. "We're trying to nudge low-income households to eat more nutritious foods," U.S. Department of Agriculture Under Secretary Kevin Concannon said in an interview before talking to the merchants and shoppers about ways to get more healthy foods in their diets. Americans on food stamps spent a record $18.8 million at farmers markets and local farm stands last year, a roughly sixfold increase since 2008, according to Concannon.
NEWS
June 17, 2015
AS CLERGY, our lives revolve around the religious calendars. For our Jewish brothers and sisters, September's Yom Kippur is a time of quiet reflection and atonement, followed by the celebration of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Christians follow the familiar rhythms of the liturgical calendar, celebrating Christmas every December and Easter every spring. And nearly every spring for the last three years, clergy from across Pennsylvania sent urgent pleas to Harrisburg to stop predatory payday lenders who are seeking permission to charge usurious, triple-digit interest rates in the Keystone State.
NEWS
June 11, 2015
WHAT'S THE worst non-capital crime there is? Child abuse? Rape? Public corruption? According to at least one of our state lawmakers, the worst crime you can commit is possessing enough drugs to warrant a felony conviction . . . which, in this state could be a small amount of marijuana, or a second offense for possession. Rep. Mike Regan, R-Dillsburg, wants to impose a lifetime ban on food stamp and Temporary Aid to Needy Families benefits to anyone convicted of a felony drug offense.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania will eliminate the asset test for food stamps as of Monday, a spokeswoman for the Department of Human Services announced Tuesday evening. The controversial test, initiated by then-Gov. Tom Corbett in 2012, ties federal food-stamp benefits - now known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP - to people's bank accounts and car ownership. Corbett saw the test as a way to cut down on fraud and waste. During the campaign for governor, then-candidate Tom Wolf called the asset test "another example of how [Corbett]
NEWS
April 16, 2015
MENTION the phrase social-welfare programs to a conservative and he winces in pain. To him, these billions paid for health care, food stamps, child-care support and other such programs do nothing but promote laziness and dependency on government handouts. Every Republican budget proposal in the last eight years has combined steep cuts in safety-net programs with tax breaks for the wealthy. But there's another way to look at these safety-net programs that the Republicans hate. What they really do is subsidize businesses that help their bottom lines by paying low wages to their workers.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|