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Food Stamps

NEWS
July 25, 2013
See the person behind the sign Finally, the individuals scouring the city streets are getting a voice and the ability to present their perspective to those who do not understand, or are quick to pass judgment and shame ("Life on the median," July 19). Several times over the past couple months, I've ventured into the city with my sister for doctor appointments and each time witnessed individuals similar to Samantha, who was profiled by Inquirer reporter Melissa Dribben. When I looked at them, to me, they were not addicts simply working the streets in order to pay for their addiction.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For the first time in 40 years, Congress has decided to give subsidies to farmers - many of them rich - while offering nothing to fund the food-stamp program that experts believe keeps poor Americans from starving. The decision last week comes after conservative Republicans in the House blocked a bill that would have slashed $20 billion from the food-stamp budget, saying the cut was too small. The antipoverty community in Philadelphia and throughout the nation is convulsed with anger.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
AS A SYMBOL of the dysfunction of Congress - and of this country - you can't do much better than the steaming cowpie that is the farm bill. It's a complicated bill that is supposed to establish agricultural policy for the country every five years, but is seen by many to be a corporate-welfare program, providing price supports, loans and insurance subsidies, including hefty subsidies for cotton, sugar and peanut farmers and other big agribusiness....
NEWS
July 12, 2013
DURING A crowded launch of Mayor Nutter's new anti-poverty initiative yesterday at the Free Library, someone observed, "It costs a lot to be poor. " And that, among the many dispiriting facts and helpful observations uttered yesterday, might be the most meaningful. Poverty extracts a huge price tag from individuals - in health, well-being, future potential and general living conditions, to name just a few. But poverty also extracts a high price from all of us in the city. Some of those costs can be measured specifically, like the nearly $300 million that the city spends for "health and opportunity," which includes public health and housing (but not the library, or parks and rec)
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Pennsylvania and New Jersey should be ashamed to be among the worst states in the nation in meeting federal rules by getting food stamps to the needy within 30 days. Their bureaucratic delays create more hardships for families struggling to put food on the table. An Inquirer analysis found that New Jersey processes food-stamp applications within 30 days only about 74 percent of the time. Only Guam, Tennessee, Vermont, Hawaii, and Connecticut are worse. Pennsylvania ranked 39th on a list of 53, meeting the federal timeliness requirement only 81 percent of the time.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
  New Jersey is one of the slowest states in the nation in getting food stamps to needy people. Its performance is so poor, in fact, that the federal government is directing the state to improve, according to an examination of federal data by The Inquirer. States are required by U.S. law to get food stamps to people within 30 days, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the food-stamp program, now called SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program)
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already under scrutiny for taking too long to process unemployment checks and home-energy assistance claims, Pennsylvania is also too slow in approving food-stamp applications, compelling the federal government to order the state to improve its performance. Pennsylvania ranks among the worst in the nation for getting food stamps to the needy within 30 days, as required by federal law, according to an Inquirer examination of data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which runs the food-stamp program.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Cynthia Tucker
A recent road trip took me into rural Georgia and Florida, far from the traffic jams, boutique coffeehouses, and National Public Radio signals that frame my familiar landscape. Along the way, billboards reminded me that I was outside my natural habitat: antiabortion declarations appeared every 40 or 50 miles. "Pregnant? Your baby's heart is already beating!" "Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you. - God. " And, with a photo of an adorable smiling baby, "My heart beat 18 days from conception.
NEWS
June 25, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
The roof fell in on John Boehner's House of Representatives last week. The Republican leadership's humiliating defeat on a deeply flawed and inhumane farm bill was as clear a lesson as we'll get about the real causes of dysfunction in the nation's capital. Our ability to govern ourselves is being brought low by a witches' brew of right-wing ideology, a shockingly cruel attitude toward the poor on the part of the Republican majority, and the speaker's incoherence when it comes to his need for Democratic votes to pass bills.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House rejected a five-year, half-trillion-dollar farm bill Thursday that would have cut $2 billion annually from food stamps and let states impose broad new work requirements on those who receive them. Those cuts weren't deep enough for many Republicans who objected to the cost of the nearly $80 billion-a-year food stamp program, which has doubled in the last five years. The vote was 234-195 against the bill, with 62 Republicans voting against it. The bill also lacked the Democratic support necessary for the traditionally bipartisan farm bill to pass.
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