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Food Stamps

NEWS
September 20, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A CITY COUNCIL committee approved legislation yesterday proposing an amendment to the city charter that would extend the city's living-wage requirements to subcontractors of city contracts and other firms receiving public money. The proposal, sponsored by Councilman Wilson Goode Jr., would require subcontractors to pay a minimum of $10.88 an hour, the rate set by the city in 2007 for direct contractors. Onetha McKnight told the committee that she works for a Nashville-based subcontractor as a wheelchair attendant at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
  The poverty rate in Philadelphia fell last year while the need for food stamps grew, a seeming paradox teased out by the widely respected American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census. What it means, experts say, is that the economy may be yielding low-wage jobs that lift some people out of poverty, but ultimately the jobs don't pay enough to feed their families. A similar pattern was repeated in Camden, where the poverty rate dipped from a startling 43 percent to 39 percent, while food-stamp need rose 12.6 percentage points between 2011 and 2012.
NEWS
August 19, 2013
It would be morally repugnant to allow food assistance to dry up at a time of heightened need. But a $5 billion boost in yearly food-stamp funding - added under the 2009 stimulus to help more Americans get enough to eat during the recession - is set to expire on Nov. 1. The loss would affect 1.8 million Pennsylvanians and 900,000 New Jerseyans. The reduction would cost a family of four 21 meals a month - "devastating arithmetic for families already living either on the edge or within the abyss of poverty," The Inquirer's Alfred Lubrano wrote.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Life may get harsher and hungrier for nearly three million people in Pennsylvania and New Jersey on Nov. 1, when food-stamp benefits will be cut overnight for the first time in U.S. history. It will mean 21 lost meals per month for a family of four - devastating arithmetic for families already living either on the edge or within the abyss of poverty, according to experts on food stamps, now called SNAP for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Why now? The federal stimulus of 2009 had temporarily boosted SNAP benefits to combat the recession.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
With food-stamp benefits soon to drop and the prospect of an additional $40 billion in cuts to the federal program looming, New Jersey antihunger organizations worry that the need will grow and they won't be able to meet it. Across the country, food-stamp recipients will see a decrease in benefits Nov. 1, with the expiration of an increase that went into effect in 2009 as part of the federal stimulus. In New Jersey, where 858,000 people - about one in 10 residents - receive food stamps, a family of three will likely see benefits decrease by $29 a month, according to New Jersey Policy Perspective, a liberal-leaning think-tank.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what advocates for the poor perceive as a puzzling irony, a Republican lawmaker from western Pennsylvania has embarked on a statewide tour to examine and discuss poverty. Rep. Dave Reed of Indiana County, chairman of the House Majority Policy Committee, said it was time "to truly re-evaluate government's approach to fighting poverty," adding that "a discussion on poverty is long overdue. " All too often, Reed said, "Republicans fail to recognize poverty as a real issue. And Democrats think that throwing more money at issues solves problems.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
See the person behind the sign Finally, the individuals scouring the city streets are getting a voice and the ability to present their perspective to those who do not understand, or are quick to pass judgment and shame ("Life on the median," July 19). Several times over the past couple months, I've ventured into the city with my sister for doctor appointments and each time witnessed individuals similar to Samantha, who was profiled by Inquirer reporter Melissa Dribben. When I looked at them, to me, they were not addicts simply working the streets in order to pay for their addiction.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For the first time in 40 years, Congress has decided to give subsidies to farmers - many of them rich - while offering nothing to fund the food-stamp program that experts believe keeps poor Americans from starving. The decision last week comes after conservative Republicans in the House blocked a bill that would have slashed $20 billion from the food-stamp budget, saying the cut was too small. The antipoverty community in Philadelphia and throughout the nation is convulsed with anger.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
AS A SYMBOL of the dysfunction of Congress - and of this country - you can't do much better than the steaming cowpie that is the farm bill. It's a complicated bill that is supposed to establish agricultural policy for the country every five years, but is seen by many to be a corporate-welfare program, providing price supports, loans and insurance subsidies, including hefty subsidies for cotton, sugar and peanut farmers and other big agribusiness....
NEWS
July 12, 2013
DURING A crowded launch of Mayor Nutter's new anti-poverty initiative yesterday at the Free Library, someone observed, "It costs a lot to be poor. " And that, among the many dispiriting facts and helpful observations uttered yesterday, might be the most meaningful. Poverty extracts a huge price tag from individuals - in health, well-being, future potential and general living conditions, to name just a few. But poverty also extracts a high price from all of us in the city. Some of those costs can be measured specifically, like the nearly $300 million that the city spends for "health and opportunity," which includes public health and housing (but not the library, or parks and rec)
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