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Food Trust

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NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Corner stores are a staple in poor neighborhoods, where large supermarkets find it economically unfeasible to flourish. The problem has long been that small groceries aren't known for fresh fruits and vegetables. That has left an impoverished population bereft of good food, compelled to live in so-called food deserts. But Philadelphia's Food Trust, a nationally recognized nonprofit dedicated to ensuring that everyone has access to nutritious food, has been working to change that.
NEWS
August 18, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the sun set Thursday evening over Germantown Avenue, hungry visitors formed lines dozens deep for local food of all types: caramel ice cream, biscuit sandwiches, pizza baked in a mobile oven. The event, dubbed the "Mount Airy Edition," was the seventh in the Night Market Philadelphia series put on by the Food Trust, a city nonprofit. Other Night Market events have taken place in East Passyunk, Chinatown, and University City. Mount Airy, which hosted a Night Market last August, was the first repeat location.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
We keep hearing that Philadelphia needs to eliminate its food deserts so everyone has easy access to fresh meat and produce. It's an important step in fighting poverty. But what exactly should a healthy neighborhood look like? That was the question posed by this year's Better Philadelphia Challenge, the student competition organized by the local chapter of the American Institute of Architects. The winning entry , by a team from the University of New Mexico, showed idyllic scenes of lush community gardens, compact urban greenhouses, and shady pocket parks, all sensitively threaded into a typical rowhouse neighborhood.
FOOD
September 15, 2011
People who are eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - SNAP, formerly known as food stamps - have two ways to make the most of their purchasing power. One is Philly Food Bucks, a program of the Food Trust. Shoppers who spend $5 on produce at one of the more than 25 farmer's markets operated by the Food Trust get a $2 Philly Food Buck in return, on the spot. A list of those markets is at www.thefoodtrust.org . Or call the Food Trust at 215-575-0444. The other program, Double Dollars, is available only at the Fair Food Farmstand in the Reading Terminal Market.
NEWS
July 5, 2010 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the bleak cityscape of Philadelphia's poorer neighborhoods, the corner store is both convenience and curse, stocking milk and cheese, as well as junk food and cigarettes. Thanks to federal stimulus money recently pumped into the city, such stores may also start carrying healthier foods, like fresh produce. In March, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced awards of more than $372 million to 44 communities to combat obesity and smoking. Philadelphia's share - $15 million to battle obesity and $10.4 million toward smoking cessation over two years - was disbursed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
August 6, 2010 | By Michael Brocker, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Thursdays, fresh fruit is now only steps away from the home of Dominique Wilder, 38, a mother of four in the Norris Square community of North Philadelphia. A tiny farmers market opened at Susquehanna Avenue and North Howard Street on Thursday, offering fresh produce - from apples to zucchini - to a community that does not have much access to healthy groceries. "Several markets have left the neighborhood in the last few years. It's impossible to get fresh products around here," Wilder said.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philly Food Bucks, a pilot program aimed at getting food stamp recipients to buy more fresh produce at neighborhood farmers' markets, has proved incredibly successful, according to figures released Thursday by the city Department of Public Health, which sponsors the program as part of its efforts to combat obesity. Food bucks "make my food dollars go further," said Bijou McIntosh, 28, who was shopping near her home Thursday at the Clark Park market. "This food is healthier, and it tastes better," said McIntosh, her bag stuffed with parsley, bread, onions, potatoes, and chicken.
FOOD
June 10, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
A decade ago, Ben Wenk had a new diploma from Pennsylvania State University in agroecology and a decision to make: whether to strike out on his own or return to Adams County and join the family business, Three Springs Fruit Farm. Then, he saw an announcement about a new farmers' market in Society Hill. His family hadn't sold at farmers' markets. "It clicked: That's what I wanted to do. It was the chance to be a vendor here at Headhouse Farmers' Market that convinced me to come back to the farm," he said on a Sunday afternoon in May, manning his stand in the brick-paved arcade at Second and Pine Streets.
NEWS
June 29, 2011
Many thanks to Craig LaBan for his fantastic review of the Farm and Fisherman ("This BYOB exemplifies the best of the farm-to-table movement," June 19). Chef Josh Lawler is indeed the real deal. I work for the Farmers' Market program for the Food Trust, helping to manage more than 25 farmers' markets in Philadelphia. I work with about 70 farmers and growers. Every Saturday morning, Lawlor is at Clark Park, every Sunday morning at Headhouse, every Thursday at the Fairmount market. He calls me for farmers' cell-phone numbers to place orders.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 10, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
A decade ago, Ben Wenk had a new diploma from Pennsylvania State University in agroecology and a decision to make: whether to strike out on his own or return to Adams County and join the family business, Three Springs Fruit Farm. Then, he saw an announcement about a new farmers' market in Society Hill. His family hadn't sold at farmers' markets. "It clicked: That's what I wanted to do. It was the chance to be a vendor here at Headhouse Farmers' Market that convinced me to come back to the farm," he said on a Sunday afternoon in May, manning his stand in the brick-paved arcade at Second and Pine Streets.
NEWS
April 27, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Consumers' burden Mayor Kenney's proposed sugary-beverage tax would be regressive and would pass the cost of public education on to the working poor. Dr. Barbara Gold, vice chair of the Food Trust, wrote, "The proposal seeks to direct a fraction of the beverage industry's multibillion-dollar annual profits to pay for expanded pre-K programs and community schools . . . " ("Not a grocery levy," April 18). If that is true, why would consumers be the ones paying for pre-K and community schools?
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
We keep hearing that Philadelphia needs to eliminate its food deserts so everyone has easy access to fresh meat and produce. It's an important step in fighting poverty. But what exactly should a healthy neighborhood look like? That was the question posed by this year's Better Philadelphia Challenge, the student competition organized by the local chapter of the American Institute of Architects. The winning entry , by a team from the University of New Mexico, showed idyllic scenes of lush community gardens, compact urban greenhouses, and shady pocket parks, all sensitively threaded into a typical rowhouse neighborhood.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2016
It can't all be Micky D's and those recognizable golden arches in the inner city. An unobtrusive but consequential bill, called the Healthy Small Food Retailer Act, is weaving its way through the New Jersey Legislature. The measure would assist small food retailers in low- and moderate-income urban and rural communities by providing them funds to increase the availability and sale of fresh and nutritious foods. It passed the state Assembly last week by a 49-18 vote. Both houses are expected to take it up again in the new legislative year.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
The stretch of Lancaster Avenue between 34th and 39th Streets transformed Thursday night, as thousands of city residents came out to taste hard apple cider and corn on the cob at a semiannual block party that made the street bustle. A crowd of people made their way down the block, some dressed in business attire, sipping a beer at the end of the workday. Others grabbed a meal in T-shirts, their dogs and children in tow. The party was called Night Market, a project run by the nonprofit Food Trust and in its fifth season.
FOOD
July 24, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Broad and Mount Vernon Streets on Sunday afternoon, pop-up canopies blossomed in defiance of the wilting summer heat. In their shade, volunteers and vendors ran pickling demonstrations, pitched passersby on bicycle-powered urban farm tours, and proffered mental-health screenings and public-benefits counseling. It's an eclectic crop for a farmers' market. But Common Ground Marketplace is designed to be more than just a place to buy your vegetables. The market, which opened this month, is a collaboration between the Food Trust, a nonprofit that runs farmers' markets and promotes food access, and Congregation Rodeph Shalom, a North Broad Street synagogue.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bent on making fresh fruits and vegetables available to more Americans, the U.S. Department of Agriculture sent one of its top officials Thursday to the Clark Park Farmers Market to tout its efforts at doing just that. "We're trying to nudge low-income households to eat more nutritious foods," U.S. Department of Agriculture Under Secretary Kevin Concannon said in an interview before talking to the merchants and shoppers about ways to get more healthy foods in their diets. Americans on food stamps spent a record $18.8 million at farmers markets and local farm stands last year, a roughly sixfold increase since 2008, according to Concannon.
FOOD
May 22, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The West Philadelphia homeless shelter Jane Addams Place is housed in a converted church that's crumbling around its residents - on a recent count, 34 mothers, 73 kids, and untold mice. But down in the kitchen, staffers opened a massive refrigerator to reveal an unexpected bounty: white asparagus, eggplant, arugula, cabbage, fresh herbs, and carrots in exotic purples and yellows. It represents a bold attempt to change one of the most demoralizing aspects of shelter life: the food.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN Brent Celek shows up at the Linc on Sunday morning, he won't be there to play, or even to practice. He will, however, be there to work. From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Birds' hunky tight end will be slinging sammies in lot K of Lincoln Financial Field. He's taking part in the Linc's debut "Flight Market. " The event is a daytime version of the Food Trust's always-packed, four-Thursdays-a-year Night Markets, wherein local gourmet trucks alight on a Philly neighborhood and foodies stand in line in a pay-as-you-go pig-out.
SPORTS
January 7, 2015 | By Ryan Lawrence, Daily News Staff Writer
JIMMY ROLLINS is relocating to the West Coast for the 2015 season, but his foundation is staying put in Philadelphia. The Rollins Family Foundation announced yesterday that it will stay active in the Delaware Valley despite the shortstop's trade to the Los Angeles Dodgers last month. The foundation plans to expand and partner with Los Angeles-based organizations, too. "Over the years the foundation has helped to improve the lives of children in the tri-state area but we feel our new mission is our most important work thus far. We made great progress in 2014 and look to continue to build on that momentum," Rollins said in a press release from the Rollins Family Foundation.
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