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Food Waste

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NEWS
May 4, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Food-waste composting, largely associated with latter-day hippies and extreme greenies, got a major boost Tuesday when trash-industry behemoth Waste Management Inc. announced it was investing in a company that owns an industrial-size composting facility in Wilmington. No amount was disclosed, other than that the company is not taking a controlling share. But just the fact of the investment thrilled recycling advocates. "If there's any sign that the world's about to go through a major shift in trash, there it is," said Maurice Sampson II, who owns Niche Recycling Inc., a Philadelphia company that works with commercial customers that generate food waste.
FOOD
February 20, 1991 | By Paula Monarez, Los Angeles Daily News
Look inside your garbage can. See those egg shells from last night's souffle, that banana peel from this morning's breakfast and that apple core from lunch? You're throwing away something that, given some time, could make your plants sprout and fortify your grass. The key word here is composting, the process of turning food waste into a decomposed mixture rich in nutrients. The mixture helps restore nutrients that plants need to grow. "Composting not only helps the environment - it can reduce the volume of your waste by 60 to 80 percent - it's also great for your plants and yard," said Rick Ryan, park manager for the TreePeople, a Beverly Hills environmental organization.
FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
The statistics would make anyone's grandmother cringe in shame. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans jammed 35 million tons of food waste into landfills in 2013. Food waste leads to more greenhouse gases, which in turn contributes to climate change. Wasted food represents wasted resources and calories that hungry people could be eating. Another less significant but no less valid concern for serious cooks: It's tons of wasted flavor. Though the EPA has been pushing the idea that Americans should generate less waste at home through videos like "Feed People Not Landfills," new ideas about how restaurants, food-service providers, and stores can do the same are coming to the forefront.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers
In the quest to green Philadelphia, officials are turning to the city's kitchen sinks. At an event Thursday, the city will unveil a pilot program to install garbage disposals in 200 Point Breeze and West Oak Lane homes. The goal is to reduce the food waste going to the landfill, which costs the city $68 a ton just for the tipping fee. Instead, residents will be encouraged to pulverize their veggie trimmings, orange rinds, and leftovers in the disposal, sending it to the city's treatment plants, where it will provide fuel for electricity generation and be transformed into fertilizer.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Lincoln Financial Field, workers rip open trash bags after Eagles games, on the lookout for wayward pizza crusts and french fries. At Holmesburg Prison, inmates mix vegetable trimmings and leftover green beans into a large pile of wood chips. At the Federal Reserve Bank, M. Lee Meinicke drives her truck in to make a withdrawal - of food scraps from the cafeteria. In the continuing battle to reduce the waste stream - the stuff going to landfills and incinerators, at great expense for businesses and municipalities - food is considered to be "the next frontier" of recycling, said Maurice Sampson II, a solid-waste expert.
NEWS
November 27, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For now, it's mostly just a flat expanse of asphalt and wood chips, swept by a chilly wind off the Delaware River. But come Monday, trucks loaded with tons of vegetable scraps and bits of meat will begin rolling into what officials say is the largest food-waste composting facility on the East Coast. Here at the 27-acre Wilmington Organic Recycling Center, about 500 tons of food and yard waste a day will be transformed - in a matter of weeks - into soil and mulch. Officials say the $20 million facility promises to spur already-rocketing interest in composting among supermarkets, restaurants, universities, hospitals, and others with large-scale food operations.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township plans to buy more than nine acres of land near the Matsunk waste-treatment plant to build a facility that would recycle sewage into fertilizer and that could save $525,000 annually, officials said. William Dunn, the township liaison to the recycling committee, told a joint meeting of the Board of Supervisors and the recycling committee Thursday night that the facility could be built in a year. Assistant Township Manager Deborah Rendon said she had no information on the cost of the land or how soon the sale might be completed.
NEWS
December 16, 2005 | By Priscilla E. Hayes
As we face the buffet table at multiple holiday parties and events, food waste should be on all of our minds. In 2003, the latest year for which statistics are complete, New Jerseyans generated an estimated 1.5 million tons of food waste, of which just more than 220,000 tons - or about 15 percent - was recycled. Much of the remaining 85 percent was sent to landfills, where it led to production of methane, a greenhouse gas that is about 21 times as potent as carbon dioxide and that even the most advanced landfill can only partially capture.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
You might consider Glenn Bergman, 63, something of the Zelig of Philadelphia's food scene. There he was in the '80s, humping desserts for a Frog Commissary-catered party. Then grilling stuffed veal loin at La Terasse. Then running a corporate dining unit. By 2004, he was leading the fourfold growth of Mount Airy's (and later Chestnut Hill's) Weaver's Way Co-op from funky grocer to spiffy organics purveyor to urban farmer. Next month, he'll put on a new hat - top manager of Philabundance, the city's enduring antihunger organization.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1991 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
As part of a drive to help feed the hungry in Philadelphia, 16 area hotels have joined forces to support Philabundance, a local project that aims to eliminate food waste. At the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel last week, Brian Fogarty and Frank Audino prepare to load some leftover bread onto a Philabundance truck for distribution to the needy.
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FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
The statistics would make anyone's grandmother cringe in shame. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans jammed 35 million tons of food waste into landfills in 2013. Food waste leads to more greenhouse gases, which in turn contributes to climate change. Wasted food represents wasted resources and calories that hungry people could be eating. Another less significant but no less valid concern for serious cooks: It's tons of wasted flavor. Though the EPA has been pushing the idea that Americans should generate less waste at home through videos like "Feed People Not Landfills," new ideas about how restaurants, food-service providers, and stores can do the same are coming to the forefront.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
You might consider Glenn Bergman, 63, something of the Zelig of Philadelphia's food scene. There he was in the '80s, humping desserts for a Frog Commissary-catered party. Then grilling stuffed veal loin at La Terasse. Then running a corporate dining unit. By 2004, he was leading the fourfold growth of Mount Airy's (and later Chestnut Hill's) Weaver's Way Co-op from funky grocer to spiffy organics purveyor to urban farmer. Next month, he'll put on a new hat - top manager of Philabundance, the city's enduring antihunger organization.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
When Paul Rozin was growing up, his parent thought food waste was terrible, telling him to "finish your food. Think of the starving children in Europe. " The psychology worked. "I would eat my food," he said. Now, Rozin is a cultural psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and one of his research areas is food attitudes. He spoke recently at the Last Food Mile, a national conference on food waste sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Food waste happens all along the supply chain, from farms to stores to restaurants, but waste in the American home is the single largest component, with the average family of four discarding an estimated 1,164 pounds of food a year - about three pounds a day. A third of that is inedibles, such as chicken bones and orange peels.
NEWS
December 30, 2014
ISSUE | LIBRARIES Shelving print Temple University's announcement of plans for a new library is no cause for celebration ("Temple's new library must go digital," Dec. 12). A major research university requires a large circulating print collection that is browsable and open. Computerized databases cannot replace the discovery process of exploring the stacks, nor have they been proven to have the same value and life span as a traditional bound book. It is a disservice to Temple's students and scholars to sacrifice such a necessity to make room for flavor-of-the-month gadgetry.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sustainability managers throughout the region were left scrambling recently when the region's largest composting facility, in Wilmington, closed because of ongoing foul odors and other problems. What would happen now to the meat bones, vegetable peelings, uneaten portions and other food scraps they had been so diligently collecting? The demise of the Wilmington Organics Recycling Center, which had been processing 160,000 tons of food waste a year, came just as interest in composting it is burgeoning nationwide.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The table was set, the delicacies beckoned. Smoothies whipped up with overripe strawberries. A cobbler confected from aged pineapple, bruised kiwis, and stale birthday cake. EPA administrator Gina McCarthy couldn't wait to dig in. "It's not often," she said, "that I get to taste the fruits of our labor. " McCarthy was in Philadelphia on Friday to laud a partnership aimed at solving two problems at once: food waste and hunger. Since last spring, Drexel University Food Lab students have been creating recipes that incorporate foods commonly donated to soup kitchens, where, despite best intentions, they may get thrown out anyway because they are unappetizing.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
T IM BENNETT, 31, is founder and president of Bennett Compost, which he runs from his Point Breeze home. The Temple grad started the business part time with $100 in 2009, collecting organic material and food scraps, mostly from residents and some businesses in the city. The waste that he collects is turned into compost for Philly's urban growers. Q: How did you come up with the idea for the business? A: I knew a little bit about composting, but didn't really have a good place to do it. I started talking to people and they wanted to compost, and it grew from there.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE FOOD in front of Shawn O'Hanlon looks like slop suited solely for a pig trough: leftover cheeseburgers, peas, bologna sandwiches and other bits stewing in the sunshine on concrete outside the old Holmesburg Prison. But to Laura Cassidy, it's liquid gold. "We have drive-bys every day, people asking: 'When's it going to be ready?' " Cassidy brags. O'Hanlon, an inmate laborer, pushes his shovel under the food and mixes it with wood chips before hurling it into a concrete bay, where it will decompose for a month or so into compost.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Lincoln Financial Field, workers rip open trash bags after Eagles games, on the lookout for wayward pizza crusts and french fries. At Holmesburg Prison, inmates mix vegetable trimmings and leftover green beans into a large pile of wood chips. At the Federal Reserve Bank, M. Lee Meinicke drives her truck in to make a withdrawal - of food scraps from the cafeteria. In the continuing battle to reduce the waste stream - the stuff going to landfills and incinerators, at great expense for businesses and municipalities - food is considered to be "the next frontier" of recycling, said Maurice Sampson II, a solid-waste expert.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers
In the quest to green Philadelphia, officials are turning to the city's kitchen sinks. At an event Thursday, the city will unveil a pilot program to install garbage disposals in 200 Point Breeze and West Oak Lane homes. The goal is to reduce the food waste going to the landfill, which costs the city $68 a ton just for the tipping fee. Instead, residents will be encouraged to pulverize their veggie trimmings, orange rinds, and leftovers in the disposal, sending it to the city's treatment plants, where it will provide fuel for electricity generation and be transformed into fertilizer.
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