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Food

LIVING
March 4, 1994 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"My favorite food is everything," says Rafee, who grins and leans forward in the chair to add, "and hamburgers, rice, chicken, macaroni and cheese, vegetables and cornbread. " When he came to his present foster home, from a background of neglect and abuse, he didn't like any food he saw. "He wasn't used to real food," his foster mother said. "He'd see collards, string beans and cabbage and ask what it was. Then he'd say, 'Well, I don't like it.' " Rafee, 8, is the picture of good health now, and wants to be a helper.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Florio yesterday signed legislation that clears the way for planning and construction of a proposed 660-acre food-related industrial park that would generate 1,500 to 4,000 jobs in Burlington County. Assemblyman Jose Sosa (R., Burlington), a prime sponsor of the legislation, said he and other South Jersey lawmakers will now press for fast action on legislation to set up the official structure to develop the center. The project has been touted since the late 1980s as a way to offset some of the jobs lost by the phasing down of Fort Dix, and the possible closing of McGuire Air Force Base.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1993 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some amazing grazing is in store for foodies attending The Book and the Cook Fair on March 27 and 28. The fair, to be held at the 103d Engineers Armory, is the culmination of The Book and The Cook, the city's annual festival in which the food-loving public can rub elbows with some of the country's noted chefs, cookbook authors and food purveyors. Besides the tastings, you can see the latest gadgets on the market, watch demonstrations, attend lectures and get tips from some of the pros who will be on hand - including "Galloping Gourmet" Graham Kerr.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
In the United States, one of the most difficult lunch-time decisions for workers is deciding which restaurant to go to. In Moscow, it is not so much making a decision but taking a chance on an eating place. Many people in the Soviet Union have grown tired of institutionalized food in state-run cafeterias found at state-run cafeterias such as Stolovaya No. 22 and Stolovaya No. 23 where the menus seldom change and often lack variety. Most food in the Soviet Union is unimaginative, tasteless and bland.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
Being slimed by a slice of greasy pizza - it's the pimple-prone teenager's worst nightmare. And the ultimate taboo for Dave DiMeglio, a Milmont Park pizzamaker who peddles "all-natural" food products made with low amounts of fat, sugar and salt, and without preservatives or processed cheeses. DiMeglio said he won't be giving any plastic green turtles to children who buy pizzas at his shop. Just wholesome, healthy food. Even without the turtles, however, DiMeglio is not immune to using a gimmick of sorts to peddle the health-food pizzas he sells at his two Carmen's Pizza shops - one at Milmont Avenue and MacDade Boulevard in Ridley Township and the other on Baltimore Avenue in Springfield Township.
FOOD
March 20, 1996 | By Beverly Levitt, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Tallulah Bankhead won the Golden Globe in 1944 for her performance in Lifeboat but failed even to be nominated for the Academy Award (which Ingrid Bergman took for Gaslight), she exclaimed: "The people who vote in that free-for-all don't know on which side their crepes suzette are buttered. " Just as the fabulous Miss B used a food analogy to voice her disappointment, Hollywood screenwriters have used food to underscore some of the most sensitive moments since silent-movie days - when a starving Charlie Chaplin ate his boot in the 1925 classic, Gold Rush.
FOOD
May 15, 1996 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
Everyone loves to bash the food at the Vet, so I'd heard all kinds of bad things about the Stadium Restaurant: it was dirty; it was overpriced; the food was the same as you get under the stands. One thing I hadn't heard, however, is that Phillies employees do not know where the restaurant is. I had a vague idea it was at the press box level, but wasn't sure where. So when our family entered through the centerfield gate, we asked an usher. "Behind home plate," he replied.
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to food, few restaurants can match the scrumptious dishes at Fellini Cafe Trattoria in Newtown Square. But service at the tiny, overcrowded strip-shopping-center restaurant can be more hilarious than an Abbott and Costello movie, proving that there's more to a restaurant than just food. Fellini opened in late November as a larger but otherwise almost exact duplication of the restaurant with the same name and menu in Ardmore. The new place is always crowded, I was told, and I believe it. The night I visited, dozens of people waited on the sidewalk for up to an hour for a table.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
A sure sign of success: It's not quite two years since the Samuel Adams Brew House opened, and already the restaurant-pub has expanded its dining area and menu. Both moves are welcome additions, as it was often difficult to maneuver within the crowded quarters or even get to the top of the stairs to put your name in for a table at this second-floor brew pub. And the increased selections add depth to what had been an excellent but somewhat limited menu. For those not familiar with the Brew House, it's above the Sansom Street Oyster House in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
If Jonathan McDonald got a little too big for his britches at a place called Snackbar with those escargot skewers, and crispy mackerel with fennel and apple gelee and some sort of powder derived from the dehydration of olive oil, he would like to make amends. Kick things down a notch. He is installed in the kitchen now at a gastropub four blocks south of that once-effete boite, and at this gig - called Pub & Kitchen ("P&K" to the locals) - it's an entirely different story. He is 30 now, with a baby on board, and he's got his feet more humbly planted: "It's the antithesis" of his last stop, he says - and, frankly, of his other finer-dining stops - Lacroix, West Philadelphia's Marigold Kitchen, and Salt, the brief forerunner of Snackbar, each of which honed his cutting-edge skills and won him no small number of groupies: "Johnny Mac," they call him. But here at noisy P&K, in the space once occupied by Chaucer's at 20th and Lombard, he says, the food is not about him, not about "the celebrity chef thing.
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