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FOOD
April 29, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Emily Watson is that friend whose kitchen is always spotless and whose elaborate homemade meals appear effortless. "I've always cooked for family and friends," Watson, 30, of the city's Graduate Hospital section, said as she pulsed miso, cilantro, ginger, and garlic in a food processor. "I just haven't gotten paid for it ever. " Now, that's changed, thanks to an app called Homemade that arrived last month in Philadelphia. It's among a number of so-called food-sharing apps and websites aiming to disrupt the restaurant industry much as Uber has for taxicabs and Airbnb has for lodging.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Merchants and entrepreneurs interested in retail, food and beverage leasing opportunities at Philadelphia International Airport are invited to a meeting May 5at the Philadelphia Airport Marriott Hotel. The forum, from 9:30 a.m. until noon, will be hosted by the city Division of Aviation and MarketPlace PHL, which manages the airport food and retail concessions. The Marriott is located on the airport Arrivals Road at Terminal B. More than 30.8 million passengers annually travel through Philadelphia International, which has 183,000 square feet of concession space and supports more than 20,000 airport jobs.
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Cheryl RiceĀ is the author of "Where Have I Been All My Life?" Mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, ketchup, onion, and pickle. Though I haven't worked at Burger King for 30 years, I reflexively rattled off those ingredients to my husband as we watched a recent news report showing fast-food workers picketing for higher wages. And with pride I recalled carefully layering each ingredient on sizzling burgers, topping it all off with a sesame seed bun. (I made a mean Whopper in my day. The messier the better.)
TRAVEL
April 18, 2016
Travel books often devote a whole section to how to avoid getting ripped off by taxi drivers when venturing overseas. We feel the opposite; we consider taxi drivers great sources of local information, particularly for food tips. On the ride in from the airport, two questions we'll often ask are, "What's a local food we should try?" And, "What's your favorite place for it?" Perhaps because they have so much downtime between fares, taxi drivers are local food experts. They were "foodies" before the term became popular.
TRAVEL
April 18, 2016 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
MODENA, Italy - As we ascended the winding stairs into the garret of Acetaia Giuseppe Giusti, a familiar musky grape aroma wafted over us, one that had we had previously associated with ancient wine cellars carved out of chalky loam. However, it was not wine we were going to taste, but another product of grapes, authentic Balsamico di Modena, the globally renowned vinegar that, in some cases, is so precious it is served via eyedropper. Modena is a city of contrasts. Two prominent buildings pierce the azure Italian sky; the 12th-century white-marble-clad cathedral and the racy, yellow curved roof of the Enzo Ferrari museum.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
On April 9, ACHIEVEability hosted Food for Thought at Urban Outfitters at the Navy Yard. The event, attended by 600 supporters, including Mayor Kenney, celebrated the organization's 35 years of breaking the generational cycle of poverty. The crowd enjoyed drinks, dancing, and sampling dishes from more than 25 local restaurants. ACHIEVEability is a member of the Mission First Housing Group, a nonprofit organization that assists low-income, single-parent, and homeless Philadelphia families to become self-sufficient.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
It couldn't have been a nicer day for a protest Thursday, as activists - fast-food and home health workers seeking a raise, the Sierra Club, Temple students opposing a stadium, and community people against stop-and-frisk, - marched down Broad Street, banging drums, carrying banners, and shouting slogans. "This is what democracy looks like," hundreds yelled as they walked toward the day's largest rally, at Broad and Arch Streets. Police closed Broad Street. Among those leading the parade was Shymara Jones, 23, of Philadelphia, a Popeyes employee who has been pushing for a $15-an-hour wage for fast-food workers since the national movement kicked off in Philadelphia two years ago. She earns $8.25 an hour, up from $7.25, Pennsylvania's minimum wage, mirroring the national rate.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Kim Campbell Thornton, Universal Uclick
WHEN WE at Pet Connection say "fat cats," we're not talking Wall Street bankers. The percentage of cats considered to be overweight (10 to 19 percent greater than ideal weight) or obese (20 percent or greater than ideal body weight) has reached a whopping 58 percent, according to a survey by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention. That makes excess weight the No. 1 nutritional disorder in cats. Carrying too many pounds is linked to a number of feline health problems. Obese cats are more likely to suffer a liver disease called hepatic lipidosis; feline urinary tract disease; diabetes; lameness; complications from anesthesia; and non-allergenic skin conditions.
FOOD
April 1, 2016 | By Michael Klein, Staff Writer
Philadelphia's new and burgeoning genre of chain restaurants has less to do with burgers and fries than it does with quinoa (the protein-packed grain) and kale (the leafy vegetable once relegated to the bottom of deli trays). Healthful eating is the theme of a segment of fast-casual restaurants, so defined by counter service and customization. Credit a heightened awareness of nutrition combined with a soaring population of millennials and Generation Xers who seem to have a few bucks to spend.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Health Department in March asked dozens of restaurants and other eateries to "discontinue food operations" following less than glowing inspections. In previous months, a failing inspection would have earned a sterner-sounding order to cease-and-desist, a toothless demand that the restaurant was free to ignore. But following an agreement with the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections earlier this year, the health department is now reserving "cease-and-desist" for instances when the establishment refuses to close voluntarily.
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