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BUSINESS
April 9, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Universal Pasteurization Co. L.L.C., a Lincoln, Neb., provider of cold-storage and outsourced food-processing services, will spend $10.8 million to open a facility in East Whiteland Township, Chester County, Gov. Wolf said Tuesday. Pennsylvania economic-development officials offered the company incentives including $102,000 in Job Creation Tax Credits and a $22,950 Workforce and Economic Development Network of Pennsylvania grant to train its staff, which is expected to number at least 51. Universal Pasteurization specializes in high-pressure processing, a cold pasteurization technique in which foods already in their final packages, such as lunch meats, fresh-cut fruits, and deli salads, are subjected to high water pressure to extend shelf life.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ODELL REED was all about helping people, a passion that went in several directions in her long life. Working through her church, Tindley Temple United Methodist, she fed the homeless for 15 years as head of the soup kitchen. She made sure the needy people who came to the church were taken care of. Every Christmas, some 150 to 175 needy people each got a gift, as well as a hot meal. On Thanksgiving, there was roast turkey with all the trimmings. Throughout the year, the church fed hundreds of homeless and underprivileged people every week.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Pavalow had planned a trip to the supermarket this week - with Passover just a few days away, she needed groceries. But then she decided not to go. She just didn't have the money, she said. So on Sunday afternoon, when the Kepniss family - David and Marla and their four kids - showed up at her apartment with two bags full of kosher-for-Passover food, Pavalow reacted with gratitude - and relief. "This is a life-saver to me," she said. "I don't have the money to go to Shop Rite - and this is wonderful.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Long before the supersizing of shopping, before stores began offering jeans and TVs under the same roof as rotisserie chickens, cosmetics, and recliners, Stanley Marvel had a thriving company selling butter and eggs. He and an associate started Sheaffer & Marvel on Delaware Avenue in Philadelphia, delivering dairy products to restaurants and grocers who would get their meats elsewhere and vegetables from yet another source. It was as un-Costco as it got. One hundred years later, with nearly 50 employees and 10 blue-and-maize trucks, Stanley Marvel Inc. is in a battle for relevance and customers in an industry dominated by multibillion-dollar global companies with buying power hard to match.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
JEFF BENJAMIN has no plans to run for mayor. He's doing fine as managing partner of the Vetri family of restaurants - seven eateries he co-owns with founding chef Marc Vetri and two others. He probably gets a better paycheck than the current occupant of City Hall's Room 215 does, too. But whoever replaces Mayor Nutter in 2016 should hire Benjamin as a consultant. Not because City Hall needs craft brews on tap. (Although wouldn't that make the budget hearings a gas?) But because Benjamin knows that no business can survive if it takes its customers for granted.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When the Camden Supper Club convenes, optimism is on the menu. The informal monthly dinner is a chance for young city residents, students, entrepreneurs, and others to break bread together - and enjoy a night out in a town they believe is on the rise. "This is amazing," Web designer Joseph Russell, 30, says, sampling stewed oxtail over rice Tuesday at the Reggae Grill on the 2100 block of Federal Street, where 15 people are sharing the table. Like Russell, a Collingswood resident, some live outside the city.
NEWS
March 20, 2015
RE: KIMBERLY Garrison's article on "Harvest of Shame": I hope your tremendous article isn't just "one and done. " I recently moved back to the East Coast after two years in California, where I would see, almost daily, those migrant workers you wrote about, gathering at pickup spots or driving a beat-up old pickup truck with too many people to safely fit in the back (if "safe" could ever be a term for anyone sitting in the back of a pickup truck),...
FOOD
March 20, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
As I drove into the parking lot of Roberto Clemente Middle School in North Philadelphia to start my cooking classes there, my competition was staring me in the face: a giant Burger King sign. The restaurant is not even a minute's walk from the school. Trying to convince kids to cook healthy meals in a fast-food world is hard enough. But with Whoppers wooing them across the parking lot? There ought to be a law! If I needed confirmation that these students, like so many other American middle schoolers, were eating this junk, I got that pretty quickly: My five eighth-grade girls answered a questionnaire about what they eat for dinner and how often they eat fast food.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN IT CAME to food, Seleda K. Taylor was the go-to woman. She not only was in charge of feeding Philadelphia students as a food-service manager for city schools, but she could also cook up amazing meals for her family and friends. Seleda - who not only fed children but also worked with those who needed guidance in the community - an active churchwoman and a welcome guest at any gathering because of her cheerful nature, died March 5. She was 71. "She was well-known and loved for her infectious smile, which caused many people to gravitate to her," her family told the Philadelphia Tribune.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
IN THE '80s, quiche, crab cakes, carrot cake and blackened anything were chichi. So were Salad Alley, Chinese chicken salad, chicken Marsala and chicken Marbella. Southwest was in vogue. Nachos were novel. Now, somewhat suddenly, if not surprisingly, like Naomi Campbell and those creepy ghosties in "Poltergeist II," '80s food favorites, well, they're back. Philly's most obvious example of the resurrection of "Dancin' on Air"-era fare comes from "Top Chef" Kevin Sbraga. Juniper Commons, Sbraga's third restaurant, debuted mid-December.
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