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NEWS
January 24, 2014
SO: January 23 - too soon to call 2014 "the year of the vegan"? Not if you're New York Magazine , which noted last week that "news outlets on both sides of the Atlantic" have already declared it. And who am I to argue? Veganism is seeping into everyday life through so many channels, it's hard to keep track of the milestones. Two buzzed-about veganizations recently seen on Delaware Valley grocery shelves range from a jar of plain mayo to a line of artisan soft gourmet cheeses.
FOOD
January 10, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1993, when Max Hansen opened a gourmet market in Buckingham, some customers just didn't get it. They weren't familiar with the concept, and they balked at the prices. But in the 20 years since, appetites have changed. In May, Hansen took over the old Carversville General Store, a long-standing but unambitious mainstay with a post office, and transformed it into the Max Hansen Carversville Grocery. He added a cafe, organic foods, local groceries, prepared foods, and occasional chef's dinners.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez and Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writers
Flames from fire pits and charcoal grills licked the night air in parking lots at Lincoln Financial Field on Saturday after the sun set and the pregame temperature plummeted for thousands of Eagles fans awaiting the team's playoff game against New Orleans. "You can't waste a good fire when it's 20 degrees," said John Schwartz, tailgating with his two sons, John Jr. and Eddie. They brought steaks to grill, but while they waited, they piled the charcoals high and warmed their hands and feet over the open fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Geography may divide Pennsylvanians, especially when it comes to sports teams, but there is one annual event that brings people together from all corners of the state under one roof to celebrate a common love of food: the Pennsylvania Farm Show. Urban and rural, old and young, political muckety-mucks and regular folks all descend each January on the historic Farm Show Complex here to take part in the nation's largest indoor agricultural event. Starting Friday, about half a million people and 6,000 animals will cross the threshold of the complex over the course of the nine-day exposition.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One out of five workers employed in manufacturing in Philadelphia spread butterscotch on Krimpets for Tasty Baking Co., mixed up Penn Maid sour cream, pulled batches of Amoroso's hoagie rolls out of the oven, or drew a paycheck from some other food production business within the city limits. Of all the products manufactured in the city - petroleum, car parts, chemicals, textiles - there is no sector that employs more manufacturing workers than food and beverage. "I had a sense that food was important," said Philip Hopkins, the lead consultant on a report released last month by Mayor Nutter's Manufacturing Task Force.
FOOD
January 3, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Michael Solomonov was cooking at Striped Bass a decade ago, his pastrami-spiced gravlax was something of a novelty. Today, though, the smoky, briny, spicy preparation is being applied to just about everything, from the brisket with pastrami jus at Sbraga to pastrami-smoked chioggia beets at Vedge. That's no coincidence. Flavors from the old-school Jewish deli - think rye bread, bagel toppings, and a schmear of schmaltz - are among the food trends expected to bubble to the top in 2014, according to forecasters.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol Seaton lives beside the Brandywine River in the genteel precincts of southern Chester County. On crisp and icy days, "it looks like a Currier and Ives painting around me," said Seaton, referencing the iconic 19th-century winter tableaux of snorting horses pulling sleek sleds through snowy woods. But while the world around Seaton shimmers, her own life is burdened by tribulation. A frequent patron of the West Chester Food Cupboard, Seaton, 58 and widowed with no children, lives in poverty in a tiny log cabin in Pocopson Township, where the median household income is in excess of $120,000 a year.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Ashley Kuhn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the needy diners at the CityTeam Ministries in the city of Chester, it has become a menu favorite. "Some classify it as the best burger they've ever had," said James Kuhn, executive chef at the Delaware County soup kitchen and shelter, "and it's a lot healthier and leaner than beef. " The burger is the product of donated deer meat, most of it from Lower Merion, Montgomery County, which has undertaken annual culls to prune the herd. Annually in Pennsylvania, as many as 5,000 deer - each providing enough ground meat for about 200 meals - are donated by governments and hunters, according to Hunters for the Harvest, or HSH, the statewide group that coordinates the donations.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's been a month since food-stamp benefits were cut throughout America for the first time in history. And though it's too soon for official numbers and analyses, the effect of the loss of nearly $300 million in benefits in Pennsylvania and New Jersey is evident across the region. "It's mind boggling how the area has so many people this hungry," said Joanne Castagna, director of the Loaves and Fishes Food Pantry in Prospect Park, Delaware County. "We've seen an increase in people - maybe 20 percent - coming here because their food stamps have been cut and they didn't know where else to turn.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PENNSAUKEN Sen. Cory Booker took a Thanksgiving Eve tour of the Food Bank of South Jersey to celebrate its staff and volunteers and call attention to the need that exists in the Garden State. "We have to have a sense of collective pride and urgency and say, not in our state, not on our watch," Booker (D., N.J.) said Wednesday. The former Newark mayor did more than walk his way through the Pennsauken facility, which helps feed about 173,000 people a year in 250 programs in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester and Salem Counties.
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