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NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY PHILLIE PHOODIE, For the DAILY NEWS
WHEN the 2012 Phillies season ended, the Ol' Phoodista thought he'd seen the last of a Citizens Bank Park concession stand (journalistically speaking, that is). But earlier this spring, word got back to me here at Phoodphair, my palatial estate on the banks of Pennypack Creek, that the Phillies were introducing a slew of new dishes to the CBP menu. And, like the old fire horse who still wants to chase blazes at the sound of the alarm, I knew I had no choice but to enter the Phillie Phoodie phray one more time.
SPORTS
June 11, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
THE DINNER that launched a thousand tweets was not part of any sort of hazing, Lane Johnson said yesterday. In fact, the $17,747.86 tab he posted over the weekend for a "rookie dinner" at Del Frisco's was split among himself and fellow Eagles offensive linemen Todd Herremans and Evan Mathis, Johnson said. "I probably should have [given] it some clarity," Johnson concluded after the Eagles finished their organized team activity session on a steamy Monday afternoon. There are several themes one could pursue here, including conspicuous consumption/income disparity, with a group of football players racking up a dinner tab that equals at least several months' salary for some of their fans.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
IT IS a comfort, albeit one of small caliber, to learn that there are actions people can take in the cause of gun rights that are so extreme they give pause to some poor soul within the headquarters of the National Rifle Association. Recent demonstrations in Texas in which proponents of open-carry gun laws have toted rifles into fast food outlets en masse got a written reprimand from the NRA - until a spokesman apologized for the criticism. Got that? NRA says don't go so far, gun demonstrators, then apologizes because, well, somebody went too far in suggesting that scary tactics are ill-advised.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
SUMMERTIME has long been considered a "dead" time in the food world, with travel plans superseding a desire to stay home and spend lots of money in restaurants. But this beach season is shaping up to be an extremely busy and hungry one in Philly at least, with a crop of new places vying for our attention. Here's a look at just a few of the new projects we should see open between Memorial Day Weekend and Labor Day. Stock Tyler Akin and Nicole Reigle are about a week away from opening Stock, their long-in-the-works Vietnamese pho shop a few Fishtown blocks up from Frankford and Girard, an area with very little Asian cuisine representation.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
MAYBE THEY SHOULD call it a "Democratic disunity" meeting? York County businessman Tom Wolf will sit down for breakfast at the Oregon Diner in South Philly tomorrow morning with the three candidates he easily defeated in Tuesday's Democratic primary election for governor. U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, the city's Democratic Party chairman, asked the candidates last week to attend a "unity" meeting after the primary. They all agreed. But former Gov. Ed Rendell, who is also attending, predicts no "kissing and hugging" after the nasty primary campaign among Wolf, U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz and state Treasurer Rob McCord.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia fast-food workers and activists joined protests Thursday in what was billed as a global fast-food strike, with workers in 150 cities and 30 countries reportedly participating. It was Philadelphia's first official participation in a fast-food strike, although there have been strikes in Wilmington and rallies in the city on the issue of raising wages for fast-food workers to $15 an hour. Industry associations say raising wages would force restaurant owners to cut positions or hours.
FOOD
May 16, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bake sale is a time-honored fund-raising tradition. But at Our Shared Ground, a Moorestown nonprofit dedicated to nutrition and agriculture education, they do it a little differently. Instead of banana bread and slice-and-bake cookies, think crusty artisan sourdough and delicate galettes - proofed in a refrigerated shipping container and baked fresh each week in a custom-made, wood-fired oven-on-wheels. Quality, said Cynthia Quinton, executive director of the four-year-old organization, is the whole point.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "CHEF," we learn that revenge is a dish best served never. The lesson comes courtesy of a trendy chef named Carl Casper (Jon Favreau, directing himself and some pals) whose hip restaurant has reached a stodgy phase. A scathing review (from Oliver Platt) causes a fuming Carl to roast the critic in person, an unhinged confrontation that goes viral, costing Carl his job. "Chef" then converts to a road movie - Carl takes his neglected son (Emjay Anthony) on the road in a revamped food truck, falling in love again with cooking and with his neglected son. All of this happens at the urging of his gorgeous and helpful ex-wife (Sofia Vergara)
NEWS
May 16, 2014
WITH its spare red-and-white sign, glowing macro-brew neons and mild sports barlike exterior, it's not immediately apparent what type of restaurant Oso wants people strolling by to think it is. But that's because the people who actually go inside already know. "Look, this is how much Koreans don't want white people to find their food," joked Steve Cho, gesturing to the unassuming strip mall, closer to a church-quiet residential Cheltenham block than bustling Cheltenham Avenue.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
DANIELLE WILSON can't afford to give her 3-year-old son gifts on holidays and birthdays. Munira Edens broke her phone three months ago and now goes without one because a repair is too costly. The eldest of six, James Moore tries to help his mother pay household expenses but often can't, because he makes just $150 a week. These three fast-food workers were among more than 100 minimum-wage laborers and activists who marched along Broad Street yesterday morning to demand an end to poverty pay and the right to form a union without retaliation.
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