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NEWS
February 23, 2016 | Paul Socolar
When we think about the critical importance of public schools in Philadelphia, providing breakfast is not usually the first thing that comes to mind. But we live in the nation's poorest big city. Hunger is a major issue and an obstacle to learning. More than one in four Philadelphians live below the poverty line. One-third of city residents depend on food stamps. And the social costs of poor nutrition are enormous. The school breakfast and lunch programs address hunger head-on.
NEWS
February 19, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
See: Craig LaBan's eating and drinking guide to Fishtown and Kenzo Before it was the trend-setting gastropub Johnny Brenda's, the Fishtown bar at the corner of Frankford and Girard was owned by a former boxer of the same name who got off early from his overnight shift at the Jack Frost sugar refinery to open the bar in time for his coworkers and the 8 a.m. rush. The morning rush in Fishtown today is more likely to be for the city's best new bagels, boiling in a vat of salted beer, at Philly Style Bagels, which opened its tiny corner store in January off Palmer Park.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
David Blumenfeld wants to make one point about Good Food Flats very clear: The $20 million, four-story, 44-unit off-campus housing that he and his three partners in Cross Properties are developing at 4030 Baring St. is a "collaboration" with Drexel University, with amenities designed to accommodate students. In fact, Jonathan Deutsch, founding director of Drexel's Center for Hospitality and Sport Management, broached the idea of housing geared toward his "foodies" in a meeting with Kevin Michals, cofounder of Cross Properties.
FOOD
February 5, 2016 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
We have seen the future of food and it's served in a bowl, on top of rice, along with an attractive arrangement of brightly colored vegetables, garnishes, and sauce. It's nutritious, it's cheap, it's bursting with flavor and texture: The rice bowl is everything. "It's a way of eating that's been around for 2,000 years," says David Katz, culinary director of HoneyGrow restaurants, now with seven locations in the region. "People around the world find rice comforting - it's like soul food.
FOOD
February 4, 2016
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NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
Workers at the Philadelphia Food Distribution Center voted Saturday to ratify a five-year agreement that includes wage increases, employer-paid health care and increased employer contributions to the pension plan. In return, International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 929 agreed to allow a lower starting wage for new employees, although full contributions would still be made to their health and pension benefits after a few months probation, said Rocky Bryan Jr., president of the local.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | Shaun Brady, For the Daily News
For almost a decade after Zanzibar Blue closed its basement level in 2007, the jazz club scene in Center City seemed almost moribund. For several years, Chris' Jazz Cafe persisted as the last club standing, until first Time and then Heritage took up the slack, at least for local musicians. Finally, Zanzibar Blue owners Robert and Benjamin Bynum have reentered the fray with South, a new restaurant and "jazz parlor" counterintuitively located on North Broad Street. "Many people view jazz as a dying art form," said Robert Bynum, sitting in a booth a few weeks ago at the back of the 70-seat jazz space.
NEWS
January 26, 2016
S AM WOLF, 34, of Villanova, is founder and "chief wellness spreader" of LuckyVitamin in Conshohocken. The third-generation family business started as a pharmacy, then became a health-foods store and now is a leading online retailer offering almost 37,000 products. The company has 200 employees and nearly $100 million in annual revenues . Q: How did LuckyVitamin start? A: My grandfather and father had a pharmacy in Eagleville that opened in 1956 and eventually changed into a health-foods store in 1996.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
The pianist arrives as the food court clock strikes noon. A jazz man at heart, the pianist exudes class. In his sweater vest and tie, Mark Randall sits down at his Baldwin, his sweet, battered Baldwin, nestled among the marble tables and plastic ferns, under the neon lights of the China Pagoda restaurant and the Hair Express salon. He begins to play. A standard, always. Porter. Gershwin. Jimmy Dorsey, perhaps. Some barely notice Randall as they pass through the old Lit Bros.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2016
It can't all be Micky D's and those recognizable golden arches in the inner city. An unobtrusive but consequential bill, called the Healthy Small Food Retailer Act, is weaving its way through the New Jersey Legislature. The measure would assist small food retailers in low- and moderate-income urban and rural communities by providing them funds to increase the availability and sale of fresh and nutritious foods. It passed the state Assembly last week by a 49-18 vote. Both houses are expected to take it up again in the new legislative year.
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