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Football Conference

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NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Mike Zapicchi didn't expect a hero's welcome. He wasn't disappointed. "I expected this," Zapicchi said of the overwhelmingly negative reaction from officials from non-public schools at a special meeting Tuesday at NJSIAA headquarters. Zapicchi is the principal of West Windsor-Plainsboro South and chairman of the NJSIAA's public/non-public committee that produced the controversial proposal to create a state-wide, non-public football conference. To say that Zapicchi and NJSIAA officials heard opposition to the plan on Tuesday would be an understatement.
SPORTS
February 21, 2009 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The proposed 65-team football-only mega-conference among schools from the Burlington County Scholastic League, Colonial Valley Conference, Olympic Conference and Tri-County Conference has been approved by each conference. The mega-conference will begin play in the 2010 season and there will be a two-year schedule for the 2010 and 2011 football seasons. The divisions will be determined by the 2009 enrollment figures, which won't be known until October. According to Ewing athletic director Bud Kowal, the merger committee chairman, the specific divisions likely won't be known until about December.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Despite opposition from three South Jersey public-school officials, a controversial proposal to create a non-public football conference sailed through the NJSIAA's executive committee on Wednesday. The endorsement by the state organization's most powerful committee means the proposal will be presented to the NJSIAA's general membership in December. A majority vote of the general membership will result in the formation of a state-wide, non-public football conference for the 2016 season, dramatically changing the landscape of the sport in New Jersey.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
To solve what seemed an intractable football problem, North Jersey schools merely needed to look south. Four North Jersey conferences are about to vote on the creation of a 115-school superconference that could change the landscape of the sport in that area of the state and eliminate the need for a state-wide, non-public football conference, according to a report by NJ.com. The massive conference would do something else as well: Follow in the footprints of the West Jersey Football League, which was established six years ago. "If they approach their problems the way we approached our problems, they can find a way to solve them with the best interests of the students in mind," Ewing athletic director Bud Kowal, the president of the WJFL, said on Tuesday.
SPORTS
December 8, 2011 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Big East made an expected expansion announcement Wednesday - adding five new schools, going coast-to-coast in its new football alignment - but the news that could turn out to be more important locally was made by a service academy, which announced it wasn't joining the conference. Air Force announced it was staying in the Mountain West instead of joining the Big East. That could provide an opportunity for Temple as a football-only addition. Of course, there are no givens when it comes to Big East expansion.
SPORTS
February 6, 1991 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Eastern football conference, for years an unattainable proposition, became a reality yesterday largely for reasons related to basketball. When the Big East Conference announced the formation of a football division that includes four former football independents and four basketball-playing members of the conference, it was the final step in a process that was initiated to keep the Big East, one of the nation's strongest basketball conferences, from...
SPORTS
December 12, 1990 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Athletic directors from four football-playing schools begin thrashing out plans for a Big East football conference today, and Temple hopes to be part of those plans. Big East commissioner Mike Tranghese said yesterday that athletic directors from the four schools - Syracuse, Pittsburgh, Boston College and recently added Miami - would meet in Washington, but he stressed that the group was unlikely to make any final decision on which schools would be invited into a new football conference.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Don Bosco Prep at St. Joseph on a Saturday afternoon in Hammonton? Bergen Catholic at St. Augustine Prep on a Friday night under the lights in Richland? Those intriguing football games could be a reality in 2016 under the broad outlines of a proposal that would dramatically change the landscape of football in North Jersey and could impact some South Jersey non-public programs as well. "I think it's a very feasible proposal," NJSIAA executive director Steve Timko said Wednesday after the organization's final executive committee meeting of the school year.
SPORTS
October 12, 1990 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Miami will not be able to share basketball revenue equally with the nine other members of the Big East Conference, and in addition, the Hurricanes have promised to renounce their independence in football within a reasonable period of time and join with Syracuse, Pittsburgh and Boston College to seek conference alignment. Those are the conditions of Miami's entry Wednesday into the Big East, a deal that originally looked like a classic case of the new kid holding most of the good cards.
SPORTS
March 26, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Competition between public and non-public schools in football could all but cease in New Jersey under the conditions of a controversial proposal presented on Tuesday by the state's governing body for scholastic sports. A New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association committee formed to seek solutions to the growing rift between public and non-public schools is recommending the creation of a non-public football conference. The committee is recommending that "a split of the public and non-public schools - for football only - be presented to the general membership for a vote" in December.
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NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Don Bosco Prep at St. Joseph on a Saturday afternoon in Hammonton? Bergen Catholic at St. Augustine Prep on a Friday night under the lights in Richland? Those intriguing football games could be a reality in 2016 under the broad outlines of a proposal that would dramatically change the landscape of football in North Jersey and could impact some South Jersey non-public programs as well. "I think it's a very feasible proposal," NJSIAA executive director Steve Timko said Wednesday after the organization's final executive committee meeting of the school year.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
To solve what seemed an intractable football problem, North Jersey schools merely needed to look south. Four North Jersey conferences are about to vote on the creation of a 115-school superconference that could change the landscape of the sport in that area of the state and eliminate the need for a state-wide, non-public football conference, according to a report by NJ.com. The massive conference would do something else as well: Follow in the footprints of the West Jersey Football League, which was established six years ago. "If they approach their problems the way we approached our problems, they can find a way to solve them with the best interests of the students in mind," Ewing athletic director Bud Kowal, the president of the WJFL, said on Tuesday.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Mike Zapicchi didn't expect a hero's welcome. He wasn't disappointed. "I expected this," Zapicchi said of the overwhelmingly negative reaction from officials from non-public schools at a special meeting Tuesday at NJSIAA headquarters. Zapicchi is the principal of West Windsor-Plainsboro South and chairman of the NJSIAA's public/non-public committee that produced the controversial proposal to create a state-wide, non-public football conference. To say that Zapicchi and NJSIAA officials heard opposition to the plan on Tuesday would be an understatement.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Despite opposition from three South Jersey public-school officials, a controversial proposal to create a non-public football conference sailed through the NJSIAA's executive committee on Wednesday. The endorsement by the state organization's most powerful committee means the proposal will be presented to the NJSIAA's general membership in December. A majority vote of the general membership will result in the formation of a state-wide, non-public football conference for the 2016 season, dramatically changing the landscape of the sport in New Jersey.
SPORTS
March 26, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Competition between public and non-public schools in football could all but cease in New Jersey under the conditions of a controversial proposal presented on Tuesday by the state's governing body for scholastic sports. A New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association committee formed to seek solutions to the growing rift between public and non-public schools is recommending the creation of a non-public football conference. The committee is recommending that "a split of the public and non-public schools - for football only - be presented to the general membership for a vote" in December.
SPORTS
November 4, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Paul VI and St. Augustine Prep should play each other in football: They are Non-Public 4 programs representing schools that draw students from similar geographic and socio-economic sections of South Jersey. West Deptford and Delsea should play in football: They are multiple-time sectional champions with similar styles and lots of athletes who know each other from Gloucester County youth sports. Millville and Cherokee should play in football: They are Group 5 programs with rich traditions, supportive fans, and deep, talented rosters.
SPORTS
March 11, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
There are two pitfalls to naming a college athletic conference these days: Including any mention of a geographic region, and adding a set number of member institutions. The modern alliances are too flimsy to warrant ordering letterhead for a name that will be either outdated or incorrect by the time it arrives. Conferences would be better off naming themselves after colors or animals, like elementary school classes. Everyone would still know which is Group 1 and which is Group 2, but you don't have to come out and say it. The remnants of the Big East Conference, which officially gave up that name to the Catholic Cagers last week, has the feel of a Group 2 league, if you know what I mean.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - As Bruce Springsteen's "Candy's Room" blasted into the tailgating crowd, young men and women bounced up and down in the bed of a pickup truck. To howls of "Give me an R!" they responded gleefully. It was Thursday evening outside Rutgers University's High Point Solution Stadium before a final regular-season game that pitted the Scarlet Knights against the Cardinals of the University of Louisville for the Big East football title. The Knights lost the game, nationally televised on ESPN, in a wild 20-17 finish.
SPORTS
November 21, 2012 | Associated Press
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - As the Big East was being picked apart, Rutgers was looking for a way out and a new place to show off a football program that has been resurrected in the past decade. Not only did Rutgers find that escape hatch, the Scarlet Knights ended up in one of the most desirable neighborhoods in college sports. Rutgers joined the Big Ten on Tuesday, leaving the Big East behind and cashing in on the school's investment in a football team that only 10 years ago seemed incapable of competing at the highest level.
SPORTS
July 25, 2012 | By Chad Graff, Inquirer Staff Writer
A dramatic hit to football scholarships, one part of the long list of sanctions levied on Penn State Monday, is likely to have a harsh and lingering impact on the kinds of teams the Lions put on the field for the rest of this decade. As part of the sanctions agreed on by NCAA president Mark Emmert and Penn State president Rodney Erickson, Penn State football will be limited to 15 scholarships per class from the 2013-2014 academic year through 2016-2017, and cannot exceed 65 scholarship players from the 2014 season through the end of the 2017 season.
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