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NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden High School football star and Division I prospect known as a team leader, intensely driven on the field, and immensely likable in the locker room, was shot and killed in the street early Saturday morning, authorities said. Jameer Bullard, 18, was pronounced dead around 1 a.m., minutes after police found him with a gunshot wound lying on the sidewalk on the 1200 block of Mechanic Street. He was just one block from the new, larger home that he, his siblings, and his parents had left their old neighborhood for about a month ago. Authorities were searching for a motive, had made no immediate arrests in his death, and were releasing no other information Saturday evening, said Andy McNeil, a spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
SPORTS
December 4, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Defense comes naturally to Nnamdi Njoku. He knows to keep it simple: Tackle the guy with the football. "He's nearly impossible to block," Florence coach Joe Frappolli said of Njoku, a 6-1, 210-pound defensive dervish who lines up in a varsity of positions - end, tackle, inside linebacker, outside linebacker - for the Flashes. Offense is another story for the senior who has played the game for just four years. "Tight end - I'm still getting used to it," Njoku said. "Not the blocking.
SPORTS
February 4, 2013 | Associated Press
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell would "absolutely" want his own child to play football. After President Obama recently said he'd "have to think long and hard" about allowing a son to take part in the sport, Goodell was asked the same question hours before Sunday's Super Bowl during an interview on CBS's Face the Nation . Like the president, Goodell has two daughters. The commissioner deflected the question about allowing a son to play football by noting the high incidence of concussions in girls' soccer.
SPORTS
August 10, 2012
Football and family mixed together at Lincoln Financial Field on Thursday night, just as they have throughout a long, emotional week for the Philadelphia Eagles. There was a moment of silence before the national anthem to honor the passing of Garrett Reid, the oldest son of coach Andy Reid. Later on, there was a message of thanks on the scoreboard from Reid and his wife, Tammy, acknowledging the outpouring of condolences and compassion from the entire region. Reid's two other sons, Britt and Spencer, were on the sideline for the game.
SPORTS
July 1, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer neiburj@phillynews.com
KELLEN KEMP still remembers the first time he saw Jarin Giesler arrive on campus in 2006 at Delaware State University in Dover. Kemp watched as a raised Ford F-150 with 6 inches of lift added and 40-inch rims drove up. "The first thing everyone is thinking is, 'Who is this?' " Kemp said. "Out of that hops a 5-7, 200-pound long snapper. Everyone is looking around, going, 'What is going on here?' " "It kind of stuck out like a sore thumb," Giesler recalls. Add to the equation that Delaware State is a historically black university, and Giesler's arrival to the football team as a short white kid from Cortez, Colo., was certainly out of the ordinary.
SPORTS
February 23, 2013 | Inquirer Staff Report
Penn State will open its football season Aug. 31 vs. Syracuse at MetLife Stadium in New York's College Classic, the teams announced Thursday. The time of the game has not been set. The Nittany Lions and Orange have met 70 times, the second-highest total for a Penn State opponent. Penn State owns a 42-23-5 series advantage, winning the most recent games, in 2008 and 2009. The teams met every season from 1944 to 1990 but did not meet again until the 2008 game in Syracuse's Carrier Dome.
SPORTS
January 26, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Let's start right at the top and say I had no idea that both teams in an NFL game supplied the footballs for their own offenses. The mystery of how a game ball gets from the Wilson factory to its appointed spot on the field never seemed like an interesting subject. There's a bag of balls, and when they need another, some kid tosses one to the official. What could be complicated about that? What could be more elemental to the game than the mere presence of the football? During one of the previous soccer World Cup preparations, U.S. coach Bruce Arena grew tired of taking questions every day on the ball that had been selected for play, one with a supposedly more aerodynamic cover and super technology that would transform it into an unstoppable scoring spheroid.
SPORTS
October 27, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Since football, or more precisely football-viewing, is overwhelmingly the favorite pastime of 21st-century Americans, it's no surprise that it too has become a polarizing subject. Those who love the sport subscribe to a heroic narrative: It's a colorful, compelling, athletic spectacle, one whose participants embody the virtues of teamwork, strength, and dedication. Others see football as a militaristic farce. Its coaches are egomaniacal martinets. Its players are incurious lemmings.
SPORTS
November 22, 2012
For results of Wednesday night's football games, visit .
SPORTS
December 16, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Turner Classic Movies, the cable network that is a welcome antidote to 24/7 news, reality shows, and ESPN's smarm, recently ran a half day's worth of old college football movies. All were as awful as they were alike: State U. gets football hero. State U. loses football hero. State U. finds football hero in the nick of time. Throw in the dithering dean's blond daughter, an intellectually challenged lineman or two, sneering gamblers, and the familiar plots were complete. There was, however, one other recurring and relevant element to these cornball films, most of which were nearly 80 years old - the corruption of collegiate sports.
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