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SPORTS
February 7, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Murphy will return as Roman Catholic's head football coach, according to sources. The school is expected to announce his hiring Friday. Murphy guided the Cahillites to a 64-34 record (.653 winning percentage) from 2000 to 2007. In his final season, the squad went 12-2 and defeated St. Joseph's Prep, 10-9, for the Catholic League Red Division championship. Murphy replaces Joe McCourt, a former Roman standout who compiled a 42-37 mark in seven years. Last season, the Cahillites went 5-6 overall and 1-2 in Catholic League Class AAAA action.
SPORTS
February 6, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Franklin received plenty of attention - and some criticism - during his introductory news conference as Penn State's new head coach about 13 months ago when he said he wanted to "dominate the state" in recruiting. On Wednesday, he came to the same podium in the Beaver Stadium press room to talk about the Nittany Lions' signed recruiting class of 2015, armed with numbers showing that he pretty much did what he said he intended to do. "We had seven of the top 10 players in the state of Pennsylvania, the most in more than a decade," Franklin said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2015
RECENTLY, football has become a hot topic among some of my mom friends. Many can't wait to sign up their 5- and 6-year-old sons to play the game. Much to everyone's surprise, when I was asked about when my son, Darius, would start playing football, I responded with an emphatic, "No, nada, nope. Not happening. Not on my watch. " "What, Miss Fitness?" someone said, with a tinge of sarcasm. "And just why don't you want your son to play football?" Well, for starters, I parried back: "Why in the world would I consciously encourage my son to participate in the most violent sport in the world, which, by the way, also has a high probability of leaving him broke, broken and brain damaged?"
SPORTS
February 5, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Citing health concerns, Clint Wiley resigned Tuesday after four seasons as Sterling's football coach. "I want to take a year off and get a little bit healthier," Wiley said. Wiley was hospitalized for three days with pneumonia during the season and said he "hasn't felt right" since the Silver Knights' final game - a 27-21 overtime victory over Collingswood on Thanksgiving Day. Wiley's teams were 25-15, with three winning seasons and a .500 season. Sterling was 6-4 in 2014. In the three seasons before Wiley took over in 2011, Sterling was 6-24, including an 0-10 season in 2009.
SPORTS
February 2, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
We men, it seems, outgrow clothes, crushes, and candy, but rarely our toys. Recently, a 56-year-old in-law built a new home. Its most striking feature is the climate-controlled trophy room he added to showcase his Matchbox cars. Decades ago, a sports editor here, an otherwise sensible middle-aged man, used to gather weekly in the newsroom with like-minded journalists for spirited Strat-O-Matic battles. And I have Medicare-eligible friends who cherish and collect pinball machines, board games, baseball gloves.
SPORTS
February 2, 2015 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHOENIX - For the second straight year, and in his second year of eligibility, Philadelphia native Marvin Harrison didn't garner enough support to be selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday night. The former Colts receiver will have to wait his turn, like several from this year's group of inductes, in some cases for more than a decade. Defensive end/outside linebacker Charles Haley finally made it on his 11th try; wide receiver Tim Brown got in on his sixth attempt; running back Jerome Bettis needed five years; and it took four tries for guard Will Shields to be selected.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
St. Joseph's football team will play Maryland state power Mount St. Joseph on Oct. 10 in Baltimore, Wildcats coach Paul Sacco said Friday. Mount St. Joseph, an all-boys private school with an enrollment of around 1,000 students, was 8-3 last season. "It should be a good experience," Sacco said. "We'll go down a day early, maybe go to the Inner Harbor, go out to dinner. "They're a good team. Playing a game like this will help us. " This will mark the second season in a row that St. Joseph will play a road game against an out-of-state team.
SPORTS
January 31, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NJSIAA football committee will recommend reducing the Non-Public state tournament from four groups to three and changing the formula for seeding the public sectional tournaments, associate director Jack DuBois said Thursday. The changes must be approved by the NJSIAA's program review committee and executive committee before implementation. DuBois said he was confident the new formats would be in place for the 2015 season. "They're fairly solid," DuBois said of the changes. Under a plan developed during Thursday's meeting of the football committee, the top 32 public-school teams in the state in each of the five groups, as determined by power points, will qualify for postseason play.
SPORTS
January 30, 2015 | BY AARON CARTER, Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
BILL "SKIP" Singletary has been named the new head football coach at George Washington High, replacing longtime Eagles coach Ron Cohen. Cohen, the Public League's winningest coach, stepped down earlier this month with 12 league titles to his credit. Last season, Washington won a playoff game before falling to eventual Pub champ Ben Franklin in the AAAA semifinals. Singletary, who starred at Temple as an offensive guard, has been an assistant under Cohen for 20 years. "It's definitely an honor and a privilege to be selected as the head coach at Washington," said Singletary, who was a varsity coordinator at various positions for 12 years and head junior varsity coach for 8. "I was told that I'd have to have broad shoulders because it will be a hell of a task," he continued.
SPORTS
January 26, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Let's start right at the top and say I had no idea that both teams in an NFL game supplied the footballs for their own offenses. The mystery of how a game ball gets from the Wilson factory to its appointed spot on the field never seemed like an interesting subject. There's a bag of balls, and when they need another, some kid tosses one to the official. What could be complicated about that? What could be more elemental to the game than the mere presence of the football? During one of the previous soccer World Cup preparations, U.S. coach Bruce Arena grew tired of taking questions every day on the ball that had been selected for play, one with a supposedly more aerodynamic cover and super technology that would transform it into an unstoppable scoring spheroid.
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