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Footprints

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NEWS
March 21, 1992
The Rocky movie prop didn't belong at the top of the Art Museum steps. Even if it could be considered a work of art - which requires a dramatic suspension of standards - the top of those steps was no place for it. But that doesn't mean "Rocky," with its Philadelphia settings, doesn't deserve permanent recognition here, especially at the site so many moviegoers associate with the film - the steps Rocky ran up while he was training. The bronzed sneaker prints installed there Thursday are just the right touch.
NEWS
August 15, 1997 | By Tonya Jameson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
About 117,000 years ago, a person, probably a woman, walked down a wet sand dune after a storm in what is now South Africa and left behind what may be one of the first pieces of human history. Her footprints, discovered last year by geologist David Roberts along a dune that had turned to rock about 60 miles north of Cape Town, offer some tantalizing clues about modern man's earliest days. "The footprints . . . are extraordinary," said Lee Berger, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A burglary suspect left behind something very important Sunday when he walked away from a Bensalem home: his footprints in the snow. Capt. Jack Robinson of the Bensalem Police Department said that the suspect, identified as Anthony Balkonis, 21, of the 4700 block of Bensalem Boulevard, was accused of burglarizing a home in the 4600 block of Yates Road and then carting the loot through several rear yards to his home, about a block away....
NEWS
February 27, 2009 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One and a half million years ago, a few of our ancestors walked beside a muddy African river with powerful, modern strides - a gait that let them forage over long distances, paving the way for evolutionary advances that make us human. The evidence, reported by a team that included Rutgers University in today's issue of the journal Science, comes from the rarest of anthropological discoveries - their footprints. Among those who helped uncover the tracks, preserved for the ages when a gently flowing river changed course and covered them with sand, were Rutgers undergraduates.
NEWS
February 12, 1986 | By JOE O'DOWD, Daily News Staff Writer
On the one hand, the snow was a boon to Officer Emmett Kane and his mates from the 8th District in the Far Northeast. On the other hand, it was nothing but trouble for George Grundke, 32. The snow played its part in a scenario that began shortly before 4 a.m. yesterday, when a man entered a gasoline station at Ashton and Willits roads, pointed a gun at attendant Melvin Ramos, 28, and demanded money. Ramos handed over $70 and the man fled - on foot, as it turned out, and during a heavy snowfall.
NEWS
December 21, 1995 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Whitpain Police Officer Joe Biletta was curious about the fresh footprints in the snow. It was 2:27 a.m. yesterday, at a time when most people were snug inside, sleeping through the nasty snowstorm that was blustering outside. The two sets of new tracks crossed the township border into Plymouth Township from the Village of Oxford, a townhouse community. Biletta, new to the force this year, got out of his car and followed the tracks. "He just thought it was unusual to see footprints at that time of the morning," said Biletta's supervisor, Sgt. Gil Carlson.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The teens were in one room and some of their parents in another, separated by a long hall and closed doors. Good thing, perhaps, since the "hot topics" on the agenda for the Footprints meeting Sunday night at St. Isaac Jogues Roman Catholic Church included parents and freedom - issues not easily discussed within earshot of Mom and Dad. That is one of the reasons Footprints exists, said Michael D'Angelo, 27, of Bridgeport, the youth minister...
NEWS
August 24, 1995 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The already gruesome picture of Ronald L. Goldman's death struggle with his killer was drawn in even finer detail yesterday, in the testimony of a world- renowned scientist who said blood evidence suggested that Goldman might have fallen and regained his footing more than once before dying in the close confines of a gated courtyard. And even when he was on the ground, Goldman may have kicked at the person wielding the knife that severed his aorta in one deep wound and punctured his right lung with another.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Renee Rich thought she had a lingering cold in April 1991 when her doctor told her it was leukemia. The 23-year-old hairdresser from Marple Township pledged her life to helping others just before her death on Nov. 23, 1994. Footprints for Leukemia, a nonprofit organization that assists families with critically ill children, is keeping Rich's promise, said Betty Rudloff, Rich's aunt. "Renee talked about helping others after she was cured. The day she died, I decided to keep the fund going in her memory," Rudloff said.
NEWS
February 27, 1993 | For The Inquirer / MARTY O'GRADY
A robber eluded police yesterday after taking $500 to $1,000 from this Chemical Bank in Hi-Nella, Camden County. The robber, with a canvas bag over his head, entered the Warwick Road branch at 9:30 a.m. and threatened a teller with a butcher knife. He left footprints in the snow during his escape, but no one was found.
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NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The Vitamin Shoppe will open 10 new stores in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, most of them in the Philadelphia area, according to Metro Commercial Real Estate, which represented the retailer in the leases. The company is opening a 3,156-square-foot store in Northeast Philadelphia's Roosevelt Mall, along with locations in Fairless Hills, Chadds Ford, Feasterville, and Paoli, and in Turnersville and Voorhees, N.J. The other new stores are in Lancaster, Wilkes-Barre and Dickson City.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Bob Berry's house on the banks of the Pickering Creek near Phoenixville has evolved, to say the least. Born as a 19th-century farmhouse, it got its first makeover in the 1940s when famed architect Oskar Stonerov transformed it into an International-style haven for his family, which eventually included four children, and his wife, Elizabeth, who started a popular cooperative preschool there. Then, when Bob Berry bought the structure in 2005, his brother-in-law and architect John Kohlhaus remade it to fit 21st century needs.
NEWS
October 30, 2014
L OUIS RODRIGUEZ , 46, of Williamstown, N.J., is president of Rodriguez Consulting, in North Philadelphia. The Chester native founded the civil-engineering firm in 2007. It's the 54th-fastest-growing inner-city business on the 2014 Inner City 100 compiled by the Massachusetts-based Initiative for a Competitive Inner City. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: I was working for the Philadelphia Water Department and noticed a lot of work was outsourced to private firms.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Secrets can be powerful. Today your inner world will be a mystery that sends someone into orbit around you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Your idea, plus a few fans and some word of mouth, will cause something of a frenzy. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). With good luck comes a warning. The better the luck the sterner the warning. You've earned your benefits and will heed all warnings that help you make the most of them. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You deserve to be happy, but not at the expense of someone else's happiness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
Janice Kenney had always lived in small spaces - rooms, for example, carved out of haylofts and paid for in barter by mucking stables - but it still took her the better part of a year to compress her 62 years of accumulated possessions into a tidy 72 square feet. Now, two years after moving into her grown-up playhouse - a wooden structure on wheels with a peaked roof, tiny porch, sleeping loft, and a few square inches of storage to spare - Kenney said the lifestyle change was entirely worth it. "You feel completely freed up. I had bins and bins of stuff in storage, and I had to move that stuff every time I moved," she said, relaxing in her diminutive dwelling, parked under a tree at the edge of a horse pasture in Kennett Square.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Curtis Institute of Music has built a roomy new stage, and it is accessible to nearly anyone who can type www.curtis.edu/CurtisPerforms . Performances by Curtis students, faculty, and alumni are being loaded onto the site, making available - free - videos of ebullient Mendelssohn string quintets, contemplative Piazzolla guitar works, popular Rossini arias, and other pieces. Eventually, the site will offer dozens of recorded performances taking place at the school and in Verizon Hall, as well as selected live streaming.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By John Heilprin and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
GENEVA, Switzerland - It is one of the cosmos' most mysterious unsolved cases: dark matter. It is supposedly what holds the universe together. We can't see it, but scientists are pretty sure it's out there. Led by a dogged, Nobel-winning gumshoe who has spent 18 years on the case, scientists put a $2 billion detector aboard the International Space Station to try to track down the stuff. And after two years, the first evidence came in Wednesday: tantalizing cosmic footprints that seem to have been left by dark matter.
NEWS
May 15, 2012
If you're driving your SUV to the farmer's market to buy local asparagus — and thinking you're making a difference for the planet — not so fast. You're focused on a detail and ignoring the gas-hogging elephant in the room. Likewise, if you're badgering your kids to turn out the lights and the bulbs are still incandescent, you could make more progress — and probably add harmony to your household — if you replaced those old energy-sucking bulbs with efficient ones. As the authors of a new book point out, you'd have to leave the old bulbs off three out of four days to get energy savings comparable to that of CFL or LED bulbs.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
"We have something really neat, and it fits the world right now. " — Ted Eckenhoff, of Eckenhoff Motorcycles of Cherry Hill, which sells Zero Motorcycles' line of gas-free bikes. "Google is a large company now so we'll achieve more and do it faster if we approach life with the passion and the soul of a start-up. This has involved a lot of cleanup. "— Google Inc. CEO Larry Page, on the company's improved performance for the latest quarter, including a 61 percent increase in net income.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
An overpowering smell of fresh leather and the words printed on stacks of cardboard boxes containing Dansko shoes inside the company's West Grove distribution warehouse are jarring to the senses. Made in China , most of the boxes say, or Made in Italy . None say Made in U.S.A. , but that's not to say Dansko, the 22-year-old Chester County company that made stapled clogs popular across the country, hasn't tried. The impressions are all the more striking because just a short stroll away stands a headquarters building that projects a company with a capitalist conscience.
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