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NEWS
April 26, 1992 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Al Hasbrouck of the Inquirer staff assisted in the preparation of this report
On her deathbed, heiress Mabel Pew Myrin drew up a plan: Her Chester County mansion and 350 acres of surrounding farmland would be converted into a home for retarded adults. Twenty years later, Camphill Village at Kimberton Hills has become known as something of a Utopia for the mentally handicapped. Residents live in communal farmhouses with "house parents. " They grow vegetables and bake bread that is sold to gourmet shops throughout the region, helping to support the farm as productive members of the community.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University has been awarded $150,000 to study how new immigrants and established residents deal with one another in parts of North Philadelphia, Hunting Park, Logan, Olney, Bridesburg and Richmond, it was announced yesterday. The two-year study will focus on the relationships between three established populations - blacks, whites and Hispanics - and three groups of newcomers - Koreans, Poles and Hispanics. "It's really to help understand how people perceive they're getting along, how they form stereotypes, how they form positive and negative feelings," said Judith Goode, chairwoman of the Temple Anthropology Department.
NEWS
September 19, 1986 | By Linda Herskowitz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maternal and Family Activities, a nonprofit organization that has operated the Booth Maternity Center on City Avenue for the last year, formallly purchased the facility Tuesday from the Salvation Army. The purchase of Booth - now renamed the John B. Franklin Maternity Hospital and Family Center - culminated a two-year effort by the Maternal and Family Activities board, drawn primarily from women's organizations, to acquire the hospital. Under the leadership of the late Dr. Franklin, the facility run by the Salvation Army served as a national model in the early 1970s for prenatal and maternity care delivered by nurse-midwives with physician back-up.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Prince Music Theater will receive a $1.25 million challenge grant from a Ford Foundation program that is distributing $40 million to 28 arts organizations across the country. The Prince, which specializes in developing new musical theater pieces (and which moved into a new theater near Broad and Chestnut Streets), is the only organization in Pennsylvania to get a Ford grant. The theater, which has four years to match the Ford money, plans to put $1.5 million of the resulting $2.5 million toward an endowment fund for artistic projects and $650,000 into a working reserve fund, and plans to use the remainder to enable its development department to better target individual donors.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Carman St. John Wolff Hunter, 78, an educator and the coauthor of a 1979 Ford Foundation study that focused attention on the nation's adult-illiteracy problem, died of cancer March 8 at the Evergreens, a retirement community in Moorestown. She had lived in Moorestown the last six years. She earlier resided in Brooklyn, N.Y., for 31 years. Ms. Hunter was the principal investigator and a coauthor of Adult Illiteracy in the United States: A Report to the Ford Foundation, which examined illiteracy's educational and socioeconomic factors, including gender, poverty and race.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A program developed by the Chester County Housing Authority to turn poor, young, unmarried fathers into productive citizens could become a model for the nation. The Ford Foundation awarded the authority a $45,000 planning grant, one of 12 announced by the foundation last week under a new Partners for Fragile Families Demonstration Project. The planning phase is the first step toward being chosen for a three-year demonstration phase, said authority director Troy Chapman. "The Ford Foundation grants are basically given to cutting-edge agencies they feel can affect national policy," said Chapman.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
I know people have daily problems working and raising families. But it seems to me that American society is changing so fast we're just flying by the seat of our pants. Who is looking at what's in store for our future? The crystal balls are held, to a great extent, by philanthropic foundations. That's because research in this country is foundation-driven. Foundations offer grants to researchers, who then study a certain area. If neither the foundation nor the government is interested, forget it. While several foundations offer grants for the study of specific fields such as child care, or elder care, only the Ford Foundation is looking at the entire spectrum of work and family life.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Haverford College has been awarded a $100,000 grant from the Ford Foundation as part of a $1.6 million initiative by the agency to improve race relations and encourage greater cultural diversity at the nation's colleges and universities, Ford Foundation officials announced yesterday. Haverford, a small Quaker liberal arts institution, was one of 19 colleges and universities out of 105 applicants chosen to receive grants under the foundation's Race Relations and Cultural Diversity Initiative, officials said.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | By DWIGHT EVANS
Though many political pundits have been quick to herald Bill Clinton's victory as a major departure from the pronounced anti-governmentalism of the Reagan-Bush era, a closer look at state and local ballot initiatives across the country illuminates quite a different message: The American people are as skeptical of government as ever and are demanding "more bang for the buck" from their representatives. It is difficult to misread the results. In more than 200 ballot measures across the country, the public was adamant: Politicians were scorned, taxes rejected as much too high and governmental expenditures criticized as way off the mark.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Terrance Keenan, 85, of Newtown, Bucks County, who as an executive and consultant with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton distributed more than 900 grants to health-care institutions and providers, died of heart failure Feb. 25 at Manor Care in Yardley. "Terry Keenan set the standard for creativity, caring, and vision in philanthropy. He never lost sight of the people he was trying to help," foundation president Risa Lavizzo-Mourey said. In 1972, Mr. Keenan became vice president of the foundation, which had recently received a $1 billion bequest from Robert Wood Johnson, then chief executive officer of Johnson & Johnson.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 27, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the leader of the nation's largest health philanthrophy looks at the world today, she sees great opportunity and growing challenge. Scientists have more data and can better measure the quality of health treatments, notes Risa Lavizzo-Mourey. But "some of the things we used to look at as gaps" - income disparity and political polarization - "are now more like chasms. " And then there's money. "We are much more cognizant of health-care spending than we've ever been in the time I've been in this," said Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which is based in Princeton.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Terrance Keenan, 85, of Newtown, Bucks County, who as an executive and consultant with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton distributed more than 900 grants to health-care institutions and providers, died of heart failure Feb. 25 at Manor Care in Yardley. "Terry Keenan set the standard for creativity, caring, and vision in philanthropy. He never lost sight of the people he was trying to help," foundation president Risa Lavizzo-Mourey said. In 1972, Mr. Keenan became vice president of the foundation, which had recently received a $1 billion bequest from Robert Wood Johnson, then chief executive officer of Johnson & Johnson.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2005 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No nonprofit arts group finds it a cinch to raise money. But those that work in economically depressed Camden and North Philadelphia have an even tougher time. So when Pamela Bridgeforth, executive director of the Walt Whitman Arts Center, discovered that her group would get $439,000 over the next three years from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation in Miami, the news was an answer to her many prayers. It is the largest single private grant her Camden center has received.
NEWS
November 22, 2003 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
The Ford Foundation announced this week that it would cut off grant money to a controversial Palestinian organization and monitor other funded groups for anti-Israel activities. Ford also will make groups sign a pledge "against all forms of bigotry and against calls for the destruction of any state. " The proviso is the first of its kind by a foundation, several philanthropy experts said in interviews. Ford's actions are a victory for Jewish groups, which had complained that some Ford-funded organizations had incited anti-Israel hatred.
NEWS
October 7, 2003 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Artist Lily Yeh - maker of gardens, sculptures, murals, performances, housing, parks and even a tree farm in a down-and-out section of North Philadelphia - has received a Ford Foundation award of $115,000. Yeh, 62, is one of 17 winners from around the country of Ford's 2003 Leadership for a Changing World Award. The awards are scheduled to be announced today in New York City. "I am immensely, immensely grateful," said Yeh, founder of the Village of Arts and Humanities, at Germantown Avenue and Alder Street.
NEWS
October 1, 2002 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An office door swung open, and Sister Mary Scullion stepped into the main corridor of Project HOME lugging a heavy cardboard box. "Want to follow me out to the car?" she called out, and - refusing offers of help - headed for the next-door parking lot in the 1500 block of Fairmount Avenue. "I'm taking these up to New York," the 48-year-old Sister of Mercy explained as she balanced the box of Project HOME coffee mugs on one leg, popped open her Chevrolet's trunk, and swung the box inside.
NEWS
February 7, 2002 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Unionville-Chadds Ford Education Foundation has awarded more than $17,000 in grants this school year as part of a communitywide effort to assist classroom teachers. Parents started the organization seven years ago to raise money for educational projects throughout the school district. A recent $1,000 grant was for the purchase of portable amplifiers at Chadds Ford Elementary School to enhance classroom plays and projects that are videotaped, said Lynn Evans, foundation board president.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Arneda J. Hazell, a retired attorney and civic leader, died Jan. 2. She was 84 and lived in East Germantown. From 1957 until her retirement in 1988, Hazell was a partner in the Philadelphia firm of Hazell and Bowser. "She was a very fine individual, really concerned with humanity and very community-oriented," said Leonard Triplett, her nephew. "She was a lady who had really distinguished herself among black women in the Philadelphia community. She was the first black female graduate of Temple Law School.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Prince Music Theater will receive a $1.25 million challenge grant from a Ford Foundation program that is distributing $40 million to 28 arts organizations across the country. The Prince, which specializes in developing new musical theater pieces (and which moved into a new theater near Broad and Chestnut Streets), is the only organization in Pennsylvania to get a Ford grant. The theater, which has four years to match the Ford money, plans to put $1.5 million of the resulting $2.5 million toward an endowment fund for artistic projects and $650,000 into a working reserve fund, and plans to use the remainder to enable its development department to better target individual donors.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Carman St. John Wolff Hunter, 78, an educator and the coauthor of a 1979 Ford Foundation study that focused attention on the nation's adult-illiteracy problem, died of cancer March 8 at the Evergreens, a retirement community in Moorestown. She had lived in Moorestown the last six years. She earlier resided in Brooklyn, N.Y., for 31 years. Ms. Hunter was the principal investigator and a coauthor of Adult Illiteracy in the United States: A Report to the Ford Foundation, which examined illiteracy's educational and socioeconomic factors, including gender, poverty and race.
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