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NEWS
December 6, 2001 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flying out of some sort of Hollywood time warp, a Japanese carrier pilot from World War II would never recognize the glittering city of 850,000 people that Honolulu has become in the last six decades. But turning west over Pearl Harbor in his vintage Aichi D3A1 dive-bomber, our imaginary pilot would instantly recognize the scene below him. Pearl Harbor has changed remarkably little since the historic morning of Dec. 7, 1941, when 350 Japanese planes from six aircraft carriers launched their surprise attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet as well as airfields and other American military installations on the island of Oahu.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Louis D. Pirollo, 72, whose love of the American flag was responsible for his surviving the sinking of the battleship Arizona at Pearl Harbor, died Saturday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Pirollo, a longtime Woodbury resident, "was a real flag waver," and it saved his life during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, said his younger son, Louis M. Pirollo Jr.. On Dec. 7, 1941, Mr. Pirollo got "up at 6:30 a.m. and was watching them raise the flag on the ship - otherwise he would have been in bed," said his son. Because a band had performed on Ford Island the night before, the crew had been given permission to sleep in, the son said.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
James Hairston had been reading the newspaper by the light of a tropical dawn when he heard the squeal of a plane going into a dive. Then a young mess attendant stationed at Ford Island, in the middle of Pearl Harbor, Hairston was accustomed to the sound of carriers dropping water bombs for practice. But something more potent than water had caused the hangar to collapse inward like cards in a deck that morning, Dec. 7, 1941. And then, Hairston remembered, "everything was burning.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
The emphasis of the memorial service was to honor the people who gave their lives in the line of duty 49 years ago. But the events of that distant day were still very much on the minds of those present. "For me, it will always be that day of infamy," Peter Ellmer said. "It changed my life. Nothing was the same after," Jack McElroy said. These two survivors were speaking of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941, which brought the United States into World War II. Forty-three survivors, including two Delaware County residents, from the Liberty Bell Chapter of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association (PHSA)
NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Pearl Harbor, sailor Ralph Jeffers was eating eggs, bacon, and sausage in the mess hall on the Curtiss about 8 a.m. when he was startled by a loud explosion. He looked through a hatch, saw the battleship Utah listing, then ran topside to man a .50-caliber gun. On nearby Ford Island, sailor John Walton was on his barracks bunk, reading the Sunday paper, when he heard a dive-bomber's distinctive scream followed by a massive blast. "No one knew what the hell was going on," he recalls.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
It happened 50 years ago, but for those who were old enough to remember, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor remains fresh. "I was driving into Philadelphia to see my girlfriend when someone in another car shouted to me about the attack," said Matt Waldron, 74, of Drexel Hill. Rosella Yorden of Brookhaven was living in Elmora, Pa., at the time. She was getting ready to go to Mass when she heard a report over the radio. "I just couldn't believe it," Yorden, 69, said. At the Naval Air Station, Ford Island in Hawaii, mess attendant James Hairston was getting ready to serve breakfast.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | By Douglas Belkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They are more worried now about arthritis, heart conditions and fixed incomes than foreign invaders. But the memory of that morning two generations ago when they were young and scared and looking at the business end of eternity still comes back as hard and as fast as the Japanese planes that attacked them. The anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor turned 56 yesterday, and 24 survivors, white-whiskered and slow-moving, paid their respects with a ceremony at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station to the 2,403 who were killed.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Honolulu has a new destination - the Battleship Missouri Memorial. The ship upon which the Japanese surrendered at the end of World War II was moved back to Pearl Harbor last year, and opened as a memorial on Jan. 29. Visitors to Pearl Harbor reach the "Mighty Mo" by riding a shuttle from a ticketing area at the USS Bowfin Memorial to the pier on Ford Island. On the shuttle, a recording using the radio format of the era sets the stage for the visit. Once on board, visitors can wander the 887-foot ship's decks, viewing the nine big guns that became its signature feature as well as the flying bridge, which offers a panoramic view of Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a typically balmy morning on Oahu. The sounds of buglers blowing the call for morning colors drifted across the tropical island. The next sounds, however, were unexpected: The deep-throated roar of Japanese warplanes and the explosions of torpedoes smashing into the American ships sitting quietly on Battleship Row in Pearl Harbor. Philadelphians William Brown, Irvin Gerben, John E. Joniec and John J. McElroy were among the thousands of soldiers and sailors on the Hawaiian island that day, Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
Several hours after hearing of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Franklin D. Roosevelt dictated the rough draft of his war message to Congress. His secretary, Grace Tully, took down the words. "Yesterday, December 7, 1941, a date which will live in world history. . . " Later, after consulting Secretary of State Cordell Hull and his close aide, Harry Hopkins, Roosevelt crossed out "world history" and substituted the word "infamy. " Roosevelt's first inclination, however, has been validated by time.
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NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Pearl Harbor, sailor Ralph Jeffers was eating eggs, bacon, and sausage in the mess hall on the Curtiss about 8 a.m. when he was startled by a loud explosion. He looked through a hatch, saw the battleship Utah listing, then ran topside to man a .50-caliber gun. On nearby Ford Island, sailor John Walton was on his barracks bunk, reading the Sunday paper, when he heard a dive-bomber's distinctive scream followed by a massive blast. "No one knew what the hell was going on," he recalls.
NEWS
December 6, 2001 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flying out of some sort of Hollywood time warp, a Japanese carrier pilot from World War II would never recognize the glittering city of 850,000 people that Honolulu has become in the last six decades. But turning west over Pearl Harbor in his vintage Aichi D3A1 dive-bomber, our imaginary pilot would instantly recognize the scene below him. Pearl Harbor has changed remarkably little since the historic morning of Dec. 7, 1941, when 350 Japanese planes from six aircraft carriers launched their surprise attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet as well as airfields and other American military installations on the island of Oahu.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
James Hairston had been reading the newspaper by the light of a tropical dawn when he heard the squeal of a plane going into a dive. Then a young mess attendant stationed at Ford Island, in the middle of Pearl Harbor, Hairston was accustomed to the sound of carriers dropping water bombs for practice. But something more potent than water had caused the hangar to collapse inward like cards in a deck that morning, Dec. 7, 1941. And then, Hairston remembered, "everything was burning.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Honolulu has a new destination - the Battleship Missouri Memorial. The ship upon which the Japanese surrendered at the end of World War II was moved back to Pearl Harbor last year, and opened as a memorial on Jan. 29. Visitors to Pearl Harbor reach the "Mighty Mo" by riding a shuttle from a ticketing area at the USS Bowfin Memorial to the pier on Ford Island. On the shuttle, a recording using the radio format of the era sets the stage for the visit. Once on board, visitors can wander the 887-foot ship's decks, viewing the nine big guns that became its signature feature as well as the flying bridge, which offers a panoramic view of Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | By Douglas Belkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They are more worried now about arthritis, heart conditions and fixed incomes than foreign invaders. But the memory of that morning two generations ago when they were young and scared and looking at the business end of eternity still comes back as hard and as fast as the Japanese planes that attacked them. The anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor turned 56 yesterday, and 24 survivors, white-whiskered and slow-moving, paid their respects with a ceremony at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station to the 2,403 who were killed.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Louis D. Pirollo, 72, whose love of the American flag was responsible for his surviving the sinking of the battleship Arizona at Pearl Harbor, died Saturday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Pirollo, a longtime Woodbury resident, "was a real flag waver," and it saved his life during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, said his younger son, Louis M. Pirollo Jr.. On Dec. 7, 1941, Mr. Pirollo got "up at 6:30 a.m. and was watching them raise the flag on the ship - otherwise he would have been in bed," said his son. Because a band had performed on Ford Island the night before, the crew had been given permission to sleep in, the son said.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
It happened 50 years ago, but for those who were old enough to remember, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor remains fresh. "I was driving into Philadelphia to see my girlfriend when someone in another car shouted to me about the attack," said Matt Waldron, 74, of Drexel Hill. Rosella Yorden of Brookhaven was living in Elmora, Pa., at the time. She was getting ready to go to Mass when she heard a report over the radio. "I just couldn't believe it," Yorden, 69, said. At the Naval Air Station, Ford Island in Hawaii, mess attendant James Hairston was getting ready to serve breakfast.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
Several hours after hearing of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Franklin D. Roosevelt dictated the rough draft of his war message to Congress. His secretary, Grace Tully, took down the words. "Yesterday, December 7, 1941, a date which will live in world history. . . " Later, after consulting Secretary of State Cordell Hull and his close aide, Harry Hopkins, Roosevelt crossed out "world history" and substituted the word "infamy. " Roosevelt's first inclination, however, has been validated by time.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a typically balmy morning on Oahu. The sounds of buglers blowing the call for morning colors drifted across the tropical island. The next sounds, however, were unexpected: The deep-throated roar of Japanese warplanes and the explosions of torpedoes smashing into the American ships sitting quietly on Battleship Row in Pearl Harbor. Philadelphians William Brown, Irvin Gerben, John E. Joniec and John J. McElroy were among the thousands of soldiers and sailors on the Hawaiian island that day, Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
The emphasis of the memorial service was to honor the people who gave their lives in the line of duty 49 years ago. But the events of that distant day were still very much on the minds of those present. "For me, it will always be that day of infamy," Peter Ellmer said. "It changed my life. Nothing was the same after," Jack McElroy said. These two survivors were speaking of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941, which brought the United States into World War II. Forty-three survivors, including two Delaware County residents, from the Liberty Bell Chapter of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association (PHSA)
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