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Foreign Affairs

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NEWS
June 30, 2000 | SIGNE WILKINSON ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dressing for success in politics is sometimes more interesting in other countries. After the Sexy Boys (above) finish drumming up support for the ruling Mexican party in the presidential elections, they should head to Northern Ireland and the teach the humorless Northern Ireland Protestant militiamen (left) how to dress. The only thing the militiamen and their unfortunate fashion choices drum up is the urge to ban them permanently from the world's stage.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | By JOHN C. WHITEHEAD, From the New York Times
Our country is the leader of the world. But can we continue to meet the challenges this poses for us? Can we continue to stimulate the global economic growth so essential to our prosperity? Can we fulfill commitments to our allies that keep the peace? The answer will be no if we are unwilling to spend the money to pursue an energetic and creative foreign policy. You don't get insurance without paying for it. Between 1981 and 1985, with the help of Congress, the amount spent on foreign affairs was steadily increased because the president and Congress knew it was necessary to meet the challenges of our adversaries.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | BY DAVE BARRY
Today I thought it would be a good idea to discuss foreign affairs. I've been meaning to do this for a while, but it has been difficult to find the time, what with one thing and another, such as the mysterious disappearance of our lawn. This happened several months ago. It was brought to my attention by Jorge, a sad-eyed man who comes around every two weeks to mow the lawn, which I frankly do not have the time to do myself because of the time pressures involved in keeping up with foreign affairs via a program I have on my personal home computer called "F-15 Strike Eagle," which enables the user to gain many insights into various sensitive world trouble spots, plus points for blowing them up. I was engaged in an air strike against an important target in Iran when Jorge called me outside to show me something.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
The latest adventures of Gus Savage are probably a greater shock to those who live in Washington and other parts of the country than to Chicagoans, who know he is a madcap and a scamp. After all, how many other congressmen have been carried kicking, screaming and hysterical from a public auditorium, as Savage was when he went a bit flippo at the thought of Eugene Sawyer becoming Chicago's mayor? There can't be many congressmen who respond to questions from reporters by screaming: "Get the (obscenity)
BUSINESS
May 21, 1989 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Meet the great gray lady of the magazine business. While other magazines lure readers with pyrotechnic covers, her front remains as somber as the Washington Monument in winter. Inside, her copy is textbookish and unrelieved by photos. And where others cut prices, she extracts from readers the princely sum of $6.95 per issue. Ah, but when Foreign Affairs talks, the world listens. "I hope this doesn't sound arrogant," said William G. Hyland, the magazine's silver-haired editor, "but we really don't have too much competition in our field.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
From what I've been reading in the newspapers, the two Germanys are trying to get back together, Lithuania wants a separation that the Soviet Union is not willing to give right now, South Yemen and Yemen have reconciled, Canada may bust up, the Czechs and the Slovaks are starting to talk about taking back their own names, the Punjabis keep telling the Indians that things are just not going to work for the long haul, and Staten Island has informed New...
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Former Gov. Ed Rendell thinks U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who some Democrats had hoped would run for president, is not even qualified to be Hillary Clinton's pick for vice president. Speaking on Rich Zeoli's show on 1210 WPHT on Wednesday, Rendell said Warren is "not in any way, shape, or form ready to be commander-in-chief. " Rendell later called back to temper his assessment. "I didn't want to leave it hanging out there about Elizabeth Warren," he said, adding that he liked her. "Elizabeth Warren's problem would be the same problem I'd have.
NEWS
April 20, 1986
Edwin Guthman asked: "Why the disparity in the mail" for and against President Reagan? When people agree with what the President and his administration are doing, both domestically and in foreign affairs, they feel no overwhelming compulsion to write to The Inquirer or any other newspaper to express their approval. Conversely, those who oppose the administration's actions often vent their anger in Letters to the Editor. This fact, alone, would account for "the disparity in the mail.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Tom Hussain, McCLATCHY FOREIGN STAFF
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - In office for less than a week, the new prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, vented his anger Monday at two recent U.S. drone strikes, all but accusing his country's overbearing military of lying to Pakistanis about its cooperation with the CIA to eliminate terrorism suspects in northwest tribal regions bordering Afghanistan. "The policy of protesting against drone strikes for public consumption, while working behind the scenes to make them happen, is not on," Sharif said, according to an official statement issued after the first meeting of his cabinet.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | By Owen Ullmann, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When Madeleine Albright signed on as one of Bill Clinton's senior foreign policy advisers, she expected a busy year. But after waiting in the wings at three presidential debates, she said, "I feel like the Maytag repairman. No one calls. " In the first White House election of the post-Cold War era, it should come as no surprise that foreign policy has been largely ignored. Voters feel more threatened by a weak U.S. economy than a strong foreign adversary, and the candidates want to talk about jobs - not diplomacy.
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NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Former Gov. Ed Rendell thinks U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who some Democrats had hoped would run for president, is not even qualified to be Hillary Clinton's pick for vice president. Speaking on Rich Zeoli's show on 1210 WPHT on Wednesday, Rendell said Warren is "not in any way, shape, or form ready to be commander-in-chief. " Rendell later called back to temper his assessment. "I didn't want to leave it hanging out there about Elizabeth Warren," he said, adding that he liked her. "Elizabeth Warren's problem would be the same problem I'd have.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Tom Hussain, McCLATCHY FOREIGN STAFF
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - In office for less than a week, the new prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, vented his anger Monday at two recent U.S. drone strikes, all but accusing his country's overbearing military of lying to Pakistanis about its cooperation with the CIA to eliminate terrorism suspects in northwest tribal regions bordering Afghanistan. "The policy of protesting against drone strikes for public consumption, while working behind the scenes to make them happen, is not on," Sharif said, according to an official statement issued after the first meeting of his cabinet.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By John Rossi
As we approach a pivotal presidential election, it's worth looking back a century to another one. The 1912 contest, which set the stage for the United States' emergence as a world power, bore similarities to the political situation today. At the time, Republicans had long dominated the White House, having held the presidency for all but eight years since the election of Lincoln in 1860. That changed in 1912. A revolt broke out in the Republican Party, partly ideological and partly personal.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Bible-believing evangelical voters kept Rick Santorum in the hunt for the Republican presidential nomination. But their fervor didn't translate into the dollars he needed to withstand the ad blitz of the deeper-pocketed Mitt Romney. Does Santorum's suspension of his campaign mean religion won't play a role in the fall campaign? No, with a Mormon and a Protestant who still gets wrongly accused of being a Muslim in the race, you can expect religion to remain a factor in the election.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
H IS PARISHIONERS call him "Joshua," but whatever the Rev. Kevin R. Johnson is called, he is regarded nationally as a minister devoted to the ideals of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. As the fifth pastor of Bright Hope Baptist Church in North Philadelphia, Johnson will be honored Thursday with induction into the prestigious Board of Preachers at the 27th annual Martin Luther King Jr. College of Ministers & Laity at Morehouse College in Atlanta....
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When it comes to foreign policy, the current Republican candidates are so incoherent they make George W. Bush look like a savant. I know that what candidates say on foreign affairs on the stump is often abandoned once in office. Yet it certainly looks as if the old guard of Republican foreign-policy experts is obsolete in the age of angry tea party populism. At a time when diplomatic savvy is desperately needed, outrageous remarks get the most cheers from the base. The comments on international affairs at Republican debates are often so clueless they've become grist for satire in foreign capitals.
NEWS
November 23, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Drexel University student - one of three Americans arrested Monday during massive pro-democracy protests in Cairo - is a formidable debater with a long-standing interest in world events, his former teachers said. Gregory Porter, 19, of Glenside, was detained by security forces along with two fellow study-abroad students at the American University in Cairo. Egyptian officials accused them of throwing firebombs from a rooftop within the university compound at police fighting with demonstrators near Tahrir Square.
NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Polly Plummer Mackie, 83, a U.S. foreign affairs officer in the early 1950s and later an active volunteer at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, died of dementia on Saturday, Nov. 27, at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, a retirement community. Mrs. Mackie, a longtime Main Line resident, put her training to work as a foreign affairs officer at a time when few women worked in that specialty, her family said. She was born in Mexia, Texas, and raised in Winnetka, Ill., graduating from North Shore Country Day School in 1945.
NEWS
December 15, 2008 | By Charles Krauthammer
Barack Obama has garnered praise from center to right - and has highly irritated the left - with the centrism of his major appointments. Because Obama's own beliefs remain largely opaque, his appointments have led to the conclusion that he intends to govern from the center. Obama the centrist? I'm not so sure. Take the foreign-policy team: Hillary Clinton, James Jones, and Bush holdover Robert Gates - as centrist as you can get. But the choice was far less ideological than practical.
NEWS
October 5, 2007 | By Claudia Rosett
In Burma, an ominous silence has fallen. The ruling military junta has been answering the peaceful protests of dissident monks with beatings, arrests and untold killings. Even United Nations Human Rights Commissioner Louise Arbour, too often reticent about criticizing tyrannies, issued a statement Monday deploring the repression and asserting that in the current crackdown, Burma's protesters "have become invisible. " But not all Burmese have been stifled. At the United Nations' headquarters in New York, all 192 members have just enjoyed their allotted 15 minutes of fame on the General Assembly stage.
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