CollectionsForeign Language
IN THE NEWS

Foreign Language

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 26, 1986 | By Tim Panaccio, Special to The Inquirer
?Habla espanol? For some middle school students in the Great Valley School District, the answer next year will be "si. " The district has approved plans to expand its foreign-language program in the seventh and eighth grades at General Wayne Middle School next fall to include Spanish. Beginning in the 1987-88 school year, the district will offer German and Latin in the middle school. General Wayne already offers French in the seventh and eighth grades. School officials say that about 235 pupils - about one-third of the student body - are signed up for French or Spanish in this fall.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | By Joe Fite, Special to The Inquirer
In an effort to prevent the possible elimination of foreign language courses at Upper Moreland High School, the Upper Moreland school board has approved combining juniors and seniors into language seminar groups. Faced with declining enrollment in foreign language classes, the district administration came up with a plan to combine juniors and seniors in a seminar setting to study French, German and Spanish. Freshmen and sophomores will continue to study languages separately. The seminars will meet for 50 minutes every day and will emphasize linguistic proficiency through speaking, listening, reading and writing the language rather than memorization.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kathy Draina didn't want to take French. She wasn't interested in German, and she had taken Spanish in high school. But she needed a foreign-language class at the University College division of St. Joseph's University. She found it. But not one you'd think of. The course is Sign Language I. It meets two nights a week and is worth three credits. And it can be used to fill the school's foreign-language requirement. That makes it unusual in academia and places St. Joseph's on the edge of an evolving controversy on campuses across the country over whether American Sign Language deserves status as a foreign language.
NEWS
October 5, 1987 | By Susan V. Kraft, Special to The Inquirer
Before the 9 a.m. bell rings at Westtown's Penn Wood Elementary School, you're more likely to hear "Buenos dias" and "Bonjour" than "Good morning. " Each Monday and Wednesday, an hour before classes start for everyone else, 30 third, fourth and fifth graders gather to learn conversational Spanish and French. Phrases such as, "Fermez la bouche" (Shut your mouth) and, Como esta? (How are you?) can be heard coming from the art room and library during these early morning sessions. The program is sponsored by the Parent-Teacher Organization and is modeled on similar programs at Westtown-Thornbury Elementary School, also in the West Chester School District, and in the Unionville-Chadds Ford and Garnet Valley School Districts.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gone are the days when Spanish and French were little more than high school electives. Long considered a frill in American schools, foreign language is now one of seven academic categories required under New Jersey's new core curriculum standards. Its inclusion in the state standards has won praise from local, state and national educators, who predict that foreign language will become an increasingly important part of a well-rounded education. But the devil is always in the details.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | By Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The kindergarten kids were smiling last week as they counted to 10 in the sing-songy style of the very young, and if the sounds were a bit unusual, it was only because they were reciting the numbers in French. For the next 35 minutes, the pint-size pupils played a game of Simon Says (known in their new language as Simon Dit), picked out the appropriate flash cards as their teacher called out numbers in French, and sang a little song - en francais, of course. Through it all, they demonstrated a surprisingly good command of the language, even if they couldn't quite pull off the proper nasal tones.
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | By Tomoeh Murakami, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sitting behind pint-sized desks in their zapatos and blusas, the kindergarten pupils at the Gertrude C. Folwell School each eagerly tried to be the first one to answer their teacher's question. Pointing to a picture of a boy wearing pants, a shirt and a cap, Edna Morales-Dunning, the Spanish teacher, asked: "The nio with pantalones and camisa is going to wear a . . . ?" "Gorra!" they shouted back. The 1,300 children enrolled in kindergarten through eighth grade in the Mount Holly School District are about to complete their first school year of learning Spanish.
NEWS
December 29, 2004 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Standing in a hallway at the Convention Center anxiously scribbling notes, Jonathan Green had just completed round one of what he thinks of as the Professorial Olympics. It's actually the job fair for English and foreign language professors that takes place during the Modern Language Association of America's annual convention. This year, the convention is in Philadelphia, and that means more than 9,000 English and foreign language professors and wannabes are making their way around the city this week.
NEWS
April 25, 2003 | By Therese Greenberg
The historic American experience. Free live concerts. Skyscrapers. Old-looking buildings. Street art. Both rude and polite people . . . These words, taken from a tourist's Internet travel diary about his visit to Philadelphia, left me feeling homesick in Austin, Texas, about 1,600 miles away. The history and culture, the beat of a city as old as the nation. That's my Philadelphia. I have lived in several states - California, Washington and now Texas for about three-and-a-half years - but I'll always be a Philly girl.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The kindergarten, first- and second-grade teachers at Mary Bray School are teaching their students to speak French - at the same time they are learning it themselves. And they are not embarrassed to admit that the children have a much steeper learning curve. In Jodie Senft's first-grade class last week, the students and the teacher were sitting on the floor listening to an audio tape. In unison, the class would repeat new vocabulary words. "Les couleurs," the man on the tape said in impeccable French.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anita Magistro Udell's father was a North Jersey shoemaker from a small Sicilian town. Sicilian was the language at home, and so "she did not speak English until elementary school," daughter Ruth Kunstadter said. But soon, still in elementary school, she was commuting from her East Orange home for piano lessons in Greenwich Village. Living in three languages - and music is certainly a language - might have seemed quite natural for the youngster. On Wednesday, Feb. 18, Mrs. Udell, 93, foreign languages department chair during a 34-year teaching career at what is now Arcadia University in Glenside, died at the Rydal Park retirement community in Rydal.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's court system has taken steps to help Philadelphia's growing immigrant communities navigate their way around the courtroom. This month, the First Judicial District released Cambodian, Chinese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese translations of some of the most frequently used documents in Family Court and Municipal Court. The translation project, a $25,000 undertaking, is designed to make life easier for non-English-speakers who have a tough time making sense of jargon-loaded court documents.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By George Will
In May 1918, with America embroiled in the First World War, Iowa's Gov. William Lloyd Harding dealt a blow against Germany. His Babel Proclamation - that was its title; you cannot make this stuff up - decreed: "Conversation in public places, on trains, and over the telephone should be in the English language. " The proscription included church services, funerals, and pretty much everything else. Iowa's immigrant communities that spoke Danish, Dutch, Norwegian, and French objected to this censorship of the languages of America's wartime allies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2012 | Steven Rea
Bully Never mind the hoo-ha over the MPAA ratings, that's beside the point. The point is that bullying isn't being addressed adequately by teachers, administrators or parents, and the kids profiled in this powerful documentary clearly suffer for it. A compelling piece of advocacy filmmaking, with heartbreaking stories, and real-life heroes, too. PG-13 The Deep Blue Sea Shot in a gauze of melancholy, Terence Davies' crushing adaptation of the...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2011 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Imagine if you and your servant arrived in a strange city only to find that everyone there knew you by name; who are these people who invite you to dinner, hang jewelry around your neck, and know all your business? This is the plot of Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors , the current production of the Classical Acting Academy of the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre. The academy gave us last summer's brilliant and charming Henry V , showing what talented young actors can do with a few weeks of intensive training under the guidance of an imaginative director.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jerry A. Caponigro, 90, of Jenkintown, who taught foreign languages at four Philadelphia public high schools from the 1940s into the 1980s, died of heart failure Wednesday, April 6, at Rydal Park, the retirement community where he had lived since November. His wife, Rosina, said that in 1998, the Alumni Association of the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education gave him its William B. Castetter Alumni Award of Merit. And, she said, "at his retirement dinner in the 1980s, he said, 'I should have paid the Board of Education for the experiences I had.' " After teaching in 1944 and 1945 in Vineland, N.J., and 1947-48 at West Philadelphia High School, his wife said, he spent most of his career at the two premier academic public high schools of his time.
NEWS
January 14, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis J. Mulhern, 64, of Lansdale, an innovative foreign-language educator, died of leukemia Tuesday, Jan. 11, at Abington Memorial Hospital. As supervisor of foreign languages in the Wissahickon School District, Mr. Mulhern instituted an exchange program with students from France and accompanied a group of 36 students on a trip to Germany; promoted the teaching of Latin; and found grants to fund Chinese lessons and to teach immigrant parents to...
NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My husband and I have fallen into a "small talk" rut. He's been unemployed for a year, and some days he just sits at home watching TV and I'm the only person he interacts with. I feel like a general "How was your day?" question can be a springboard to other conversation - but not when he just says, "Fine. " What can we do about this rut? Answer: Obviously this is a bigger problem than small talk - unemployed spouse, getting depressed, losing confidence and sense of self - but sometimes small adjustments can help ease the stress of bigger problems.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Students in Madame Maria Wells' fifth-grade class at Cynwyd Elementary School were having great fun Thursday morning - while learning French at the same time. Through songs, games, and discussion, mostly in French, Wells taught anatomy vocabulary words to the Lower Merion district children, now in their fourth year of instruction. The class, which meets three days a week, also talked about English words that have their origins in French terms. "The connections between French and those words helps me remember them and know what they mean," student Benjamin Nagle said.
NEWS
December 29, 2009 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Parry, Keith Goldsmith, and Sylvia Ruiz-Tresgallo were pondering the future, each in his or her own way, at the 125th annual meeting of the Modern Language Association this week in Philadelphia. That future is bringing a change from paperbound authorship to online maintenance of a scholar's writing and the discussion that surrounds it. Publishing is increasingly digital. As for the present, it's about praying to the academic gods for employment. Regina B. Oost, chair of the English Department at Wesleyan College in Macon, Ga., described the employment outlook succinctly: "Fewer jobs.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|