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NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
A recent NBC News poll found that only 11 percent of Democrats consider terrorism the most important issue in the presidential race, and only 5 percent cite foreign policy overall. Perhaps that's why Bernie Sanders didn't seem worried about his fumbling foreign-policy performance when he debated Hillary Clinton just days before the New Hampshire primary. After all, his campaign has soared beyond expectations thanks to his railing against rising inequality and Wall Street. But given Sanders' success and the unpredictable nature of this election year, his grasp of foreign policy - or lack thereof - should be of concern to voters.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
I've just returned from a gorgeous Maine vacation in time to follow the hoopla of the presidential conventions (from the sublime to the ridiculous?). I'll be writing on Mitt Romney's foreign-policy potential - and President Obama's performance - as the conventions progress. But having read the GOP's foreign-policy platform, with its slashing critique of the president, I can already say this: A Romney foreign policy would likely wind up looking much like Obama's. Despite a call for another "American century" in which we possess the "strongest military and strongest economy," a President Romney would soon confront the realities of today's world.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
BOCA RATON, Fla. - A forceful President Obama accused Republican Mitt Romney on Monday of taking a muddled approach to foreign policy that would only encourage the nation's enemies in a dangerous world. Romney parried by arguing that Obama has failed to address the threats from a Middle East in upheaval, with an Islamist regime in Egypt and a Syria convulsed in civil war, and had "wasted" four years while Iran moved closer to having a nuclear weapon. American needs "strong steady leadership, not wrong and reckless leadership that's all over the map," Obama said.
NEWS
July 31, 2008 | By Theodore Couloumbis and Bill Ahlstrom
American foreign policy has often been described as oscillating between realist and idealist poles. The U.S. presidential election campaign offers an excellent opportunity to subject the presumptive Democratic and Republican nominees to a realist-idealist test. Realists see the world through gray and melancholy lenses: humans are selfish and aggressive by nature, and conflict between political entities is inevitable. Diplomacy, backed by military force, can at best moderate state behavior, if favorable balances of power are maintained by coalitions of the privileged and the satisfied.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Charles Krauthammer
"Obama may be moving toward something resembling a doctrine. One of his advisers described the president's actions in Libya as 'leading from behind.' " - Ryan Lizza, The New Yorker To be precise, leading from behind is a style, not a doctrine. Doctrines involve ideas, but since there are no discernible ones that make sense of Obama's foreign policy - Lizza's painstaking two-year chronicle shows it to be as ad hoc, erratic, and confused as it appears - this will have to do. And it surely is an accurate description, from President Obama's shocking passivity during Iran's 2009 Green Revolution to his dithering on Libya, acting at the very last moment, and then handing off to a bickering coalition, yielding the current bloody stalemate.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By Charles Krauthammer
It is perfectly obvious that Iran's latest uranium maneuver, brokered by Brazil and Turkey, is a ruse. Iran retains more than enough enriched uranium to make a bomb. And it continues enriching at an accelerated pace and to a greater purity (20 percent). Which is why the French foreign ministry immediately declared that the trumpeted temporary shipping of some Iranian uranium to Turkey will do nothing to halt Iran's nuclear program. It will, however, make meaningful sanctions more difficult.
NEWS
April 16, 1996 | By Ross K. Baker
Watching an old kinescope of the 1960 debates between Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy, I was reminded of how hard Kennedy attacked on three foreign policy issues. One of them, the so-called missile gap, was a myth. The second, the resoluteness of the Eisenhower administration's stand in defense of the two tiny islands of Quemoy and Matsu, was trivial. The third, the question of the administration's toughness toward Castro, put Nixon in a bind because, as vice president, he couldn't reveal that plans already had been laid for the invasion of the island by Cuban exiles.
NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Jon Huntsman Jr., far behind in the race for the GOP presidential nomination, outlined his foreign policy Monday, trying to steer a course less hawkish than the party's leader, Mitt Romney, but still forceful enough to attract Republican support. The former U.S. ambassador to China, Huntsman was also critical of President Obama, his former boss, saying the president's foreign policy lacked leadership. "The world needs American leadership now more than ever.
NEWS
September 5, 2001 | By Trudy Rubin
Maybe we all expected too much from Colin Powell. When the the charismatic ex-general was appointed Secretary of State, he seemed the perfect choice to shape a foreign-policy vision for a President who lacked one. He was a glamorous diplomat-warrior. He looked just the ticket to tone down the administration's gung-ho Star Wars crowd, with a dose of realism honed by years of military service. He seemed poised to become the great articulator, to explain why America must remain internationalist.
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NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
It doesn't require a foreign-policy speech by Hillary Clinton to prove that Donald Trump is unfit to be commander in chief. But Clinton did the country a service last week by laying out the dangers of having Trump's hand on the nuclear trigger. She had only to quote some of Trump's bizarre foreign-policy statements and his rants against perceived enemies. These include U.S. judges; journalists; the Republican governor of New Mexico; U.S. allies such as Germany's Angela Merkel and Britain's David Cameron; Pope Francis; and just about anyone who displeases him. The Donald's temperament problem is all too apparent.
NEWS
May 3, 2016
A FEW HOURS after he strengthened his claim to be the presumptive Republican nominee for president by winning five more primaries, Donald Trump delivered a speech on foreign policy in Washington on Wednesday to a group of foreign-policy insiders - a speech aimed at beefing up the presidential credentials of a man with an exceedingly thin résumé on global affairs. His remarks, while easy to challenge on several points - such as his suggestion that President Obama "has not been a friend to Israel" - were decidedly calmer and more coherent than the trash talk he has directed in the past against immigrants, Muslims and America's allies and trading partners.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
Foreign policy does not determine American elections. Indeed, of all Western countries, we are the least interested in the subject. The reason is simple: We haven't had to be. Our instinctive isolationism derives from our geographic exceptionalism. As Bismarck once explained (it is said), the United States is the most fortunate of all great powers, bordered on two sides by weak neighbors and on the other two by fish. Two world wars, nuclear missiles, and international terrorism have disabused us of the illusion of safety-by-isolation.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
How would President Hillary Clinton conduct foreign policy? After decades of public exposure, including four years as secretary of state, one would think the answer to that question would be obvious. But it isn't entirely clear. Perhaps that's because Sen. Bernie Sanders, whom she debated Thursday ahead of the New York primary, has tried to paint her as Hillary Hawk by constantly harping on her Senate vote for the Iraq war (while punting on most foreign policy questions). Clinton has apologized for backing the 2003 war. Or perhaps it's because her role as secretary was constrained by the fact that during her tenure, foreign policy decision-making was closely held by the Obama White House.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
Before the Wisconsin primary, Sen. Ted Cruz's views on foreign policy got too little attention. The media was so focused on Donald Trump's wacky worldview and odd foreign policy "advisers" that scant attention was paid to the Texan's foreign policy doctrine or team. That neglect should end now that Cruz's win on Tuesday has undercut Trump's chance of clinching the nomination before the GOP convention. And once you start paying attention, what you find almost makes The Donald look good.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Emma Ashford
Donald Trump has finally given us greater insight into his approach to foreign policy. Last week, he not only conducted interviews with the Washington Post and New York Times, but revealed his long-promised list of foreign policy advisers, and addressed the annual AIPAC conference. His remarks led some to note that a restrained or realist worldview was implicit in Trump's statements. Unfortunately, for those who seek a more restrained foreign policy, there is little reason to celebrate.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Clinton, Sanders gird for drawn-out battle. A18. Currents Some big names could find the road ends in New Hampshire. C1. Sanders needs a stronger grasp of foreign policy. Trudy Rubin, C1.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
A recent NBC News poll found that only 11 percent of Democrats consider terrorism the most important issue in the presidential race, and only 5 percent cite foreign policy overall. Perhaps that's why Bernie Sanders didn't seem worried about his fumbling foreign-policy performance when he debated Hillary Clinton just days before the New Hampshire primary. After all, his campaign has soared beyond expectations thanks to his railing against rising inequality and Wall Street. But given Sanders' success and the unpredictable nature of this election year, his grasp of foreign policy - or lack thereof - should be of concern to voters.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
If you're going to engage in a foreign policy capitulation, might as well do it when everyone is getting tanked and otherwise occupied. Say, New Year's Eve. Here's the story. In October, Iran test-fires a nuclear-capable ballistic missile in brazen violation of unanimous Security Council resolutions. President Obama does nothing. One month later, Iran does it again. The administration makes a few gestures at the United Nations. Then nothing. Then finally, on Dec. 30, the White House announces a few sanctions.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writers
There was a ghost in the room as the four Republican candidates with the lowest poll numbers met in the so-called undercard debate Wednesday at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif.: Donald Trump. Trump, of course, would not appear until the prime-time debate, right in the center of the stage in front of the Boeing 707 that served as President Ronald Reagan's Air Force One. "Hillary Clinton is gift-wrapping this election for us," Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal said.
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